20 Years of Global Migration—in One Chart

Geographers have used census data from 150 countries to map human traffic over time. by Nick Stockton It’s no secret that the world’s population is on the move, but it’s rare to get a glimpse of where that flow is happening. In a study released Friday in Science, a team of geographers used data snapshots to create a broad analysis of global migrations over 20 years. The study was conducted by three geographic researchers from the Wittgenstein Centre for Demography and Global Human Capital in Vienna. The researchers presented their data in five-year increments, from 1990 to 2010. Their research … Continue reading 20 Years of Global Migration—in One Chart

The Surprising Failures of 12 Steps

How a pseudoscientific, religious organization birthed the most trusted method of addiction treatment by Jake Flanagin Say you’ve been diagnosed with a serious, life-altering illness or psychological condition. In lieu of medication, psychotherapy, or a combination thereof, your doctor prescribes nightly meetings with a group of similarly afflicted individuals, and a set of 12 non-medical guidelines for recovery, half of which require direct appeals to God. What would you do? Especially to nontheists, the concept of “asking God to remove defects of character” can feel anachronistic. But it is the sixth step in the 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous—the prototype … Continue reading The Surprising Failures of 12 Steps

Has a plague already arrived? 205 Americans die each day after acquiring superbug hospital infections

Friday, March 28, 2014 by Mike Adams (NaturalNews) If a jumbo jet crashed into the ocean every single day, it would roughly equal the number of Americans who die each day following superbug infections acquired at U.S. hospitals. Far from being some hyped-up scare story, that’s actually the conclusion of none other than the CDC, which has now publicly warned that 1 in 25 hospital patients gets infected and tens of thousands die each year. “On any given day, 1 in 25 hospital patients has at least one healthcare-associated infection,” reports the CDC newsroom.(1) “The CDC’s 2011 survey of 183 … Continue reading Has a plague already arrived? 205 Americans die each day after acquiring superbug hospital infections

What Makes Us Human? Scientists Come One Step Closer To ‘Creating’ A Human Being

By Chris Carrington Being very interested in all things scientific I am always amazed by the massive leaps and bound in science and technology that seem to be gathering pace as time moves on. Having said that, every so often I see something, that upon closer scrutiny makes me wonder where it’s all going and what the outcome will be for us mere mortals. This article is about one such development. Scientists have for decades wanted to find a way where they can actually ‘see’ the damage done to our internal organs by toxins that range from drugs to air … Continue reading What Makes Us Human? Scientists Come One Step Closer To ‘Creating’ A Human Being

Israel shut embassies to store nukes: Gordon Duff

Recent closure of Israeli embassies across the world has been a scenario by Tel Aviv to store nuclear weapons in its diplomatic facilities, a political analyst says. In an article published on Press TV website, Gordon Duff stated that the unprecedented closure of the Israeli embassies “may well be true” but some would “cite the long-time rumor that Israel has stored nuclear weapons in all her embassies.” Duff also alleged that satellite-based sensors have detected Special Nuclear Material (SNM) at Israeli embassies and consular facilities. “There is, in fact, a ‘war plan’ that includes simultaneous assaults on the worldwide embassy/consular … Continue reading Israel shut embassies to store nukes: Gordon Duff

Cancer patient jailed for late payment on $5 dog license renewal

(Source: Mass Live)  HOLYOKE, MA — A sick woman found herself shackled and locked in a cage — all stemming back to a $5 late fee to the government. In Massachusetts, freedom is so abridged that even simple things like owning a pet require paid permission from the government. Its so onerous that in some municipalities, there are multiple licenses required. Such is the case in Holyoke, where dog owners must pay for permission from both the state and the city — every year. But asking for permission to own her 14-year-old dog, Pumpkin, for another year was not exactly … Continue reading Cancer patient jailed for late payment on $5 dog license renewal

Cast-off wife of Saudi king begs Obama to help free her four starving daughters who’ve been ‘locked away in a palace for 13 years’

Better days: Alanoud AlFayez, a former princess married to Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah, says their daughters have been held in a Saudi Arabia palace against their will for 13 years. This undated picture shows sisters Sahar, Maha, Hala and Jawaher when they were children. They are now in their 30s and 40s .Alanoud AlFayez, 57, appealed to Obama on Thursday as he prepares to visit Saudi Arabia and King Abdullah .AlFayez was once married to the king but fled to London after he divorced her in 2003 .The women and their mother say they’re being starved and physically and psychologically … Continue reading Cast-off wife of Saudi king begs Obama to help free her four starving daughters who’ve been ‘locked away in a palace for 13 years’

What happiness conceals

Smile for the camera: women in the Trashi Yangtse district of Bhutan. The Himalayan nation targeted ‘Gross National Happiness’ as a major development measure. Photo by Ami Vitale/Panos For years, economists have laboured on the riddle of happiness. If they studied misery instead, they might get somewhere by John Quiggin There has, over the past couple of decades, been a remarkable boom in economic research into happiness. Strangely enough, it might have originated in remarks made in the early 1970s by Jigme Singye Wangchuck at the time of his coronation as absolute monarch of Bhutan, one of the poorest countries … Continue reading What happiness conceals

A good trip

Not magic but medicine. Photo by Getty Researchers are giving psychedelics to cancer patients to help alleviate their despair — and it’s working by Linda Marsa On a bone-chilling morning in February last year, Nick Fernandez bundled up and took the subway from his Manhattan apartment to the Bluestone Center for Clinical Research, which is located in an art deco-style building on the Upper East Side. A 27-year-old graduate student in psychology with dark, wavy hair and delicate, bird-like features, Fernandez was excited and nervous. He had eaten a light breakfast consisting of a bagel and industrial-strength coffee in preparation … Continue reading A good trip

Q&A: Gerd Ludwig’s Long Look at the Chernobyl Disaster

2005. Suffering from thyroid cancer, Oleg Shapiro, 54, and Dima Bogdanovich, 13, receive care at a thyroid hospital in Minsk, where surgery is performed on a daily basis. As a liquidator, Oleg was exposed to extreme levels of radiation. It was his third thyroid operation. Dima’s mother claims that Chernobyl’s nuclear fallout is responsible for her son’s cancer, but his doctors are more cautious: Belarusian officials are often instructed to downplay the severity of the radiation. by Alexa Keefe Deep inside, at a dark hallway, we stopped in front of a heavy metal door. The engineer indicated I had only … Continue reading Q&A: Gerd Ludwig’s Long Look at the Chernobyl Disaster