Beardsley’s Poe

by Dan Piepenbring Illustrations by Aubrey Beardsley, made to accompany Edgar Allan Poe’s short stories. Beardsley, born on August 21, 1872, favored the grotesque and the erotic in his drawings and had a large influence on the developing the Art Nouveau style, though he lived only to twenty-five. He also illustrated work by Oscar Wilde and Alexander Pope and helped foundThe Yellow Book.        From “The Murders in the Rue Morgue.”       From “The Black Cat.”          From “The Fall of the House of Usher.”       From “The Masque of the Red Death.” more… http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2015/08/21/beardsleys-poe/ Continue reading Beardsley’s Poe

Heading Out on Your Own — Day 17: Essential Etiquette for Young Men

Brett & Kate McKay “In whatever society, or in whatever part of the world, a gentleman may happen to be, he always complies externally with the spirit and usages of the place… A gentleman always possesses a certain self-respect—not indeed touching upon self-esteem, and far removed from self-conceit…Indeed a gentleman, in the highest signification of the term, is a noble animal…Employing in the regulation of his own conduct, the strictest standard of propriety, and in his expectations of that of others, the most lenient; cautious in accepting quarrel, more cautious in giving cause for it; lending to virtue the forms … Continue reading Heading Out on Your Own — Day 17: Essential Etiquette for Young Men

8 Pieces of Photo Gear I Wish I Hadn’t Purchased

by Allen Murabayashi Since my first DSLR purchase in 2001, I’ve exhibited symptoms of Gear Acquisition Syndrome that have left a sizable dent in my wallet. Here is a list of my most regrettable acquisitions. What are yours? #1: Strip boxes I belong to the Church of the Infinite Watt/Second. In other words, I couldn’t possibly have enough lighting gear. And during a turbulent lighting modifier phase, I was convinced of the necessity to own strip light boxes. Now don’t get me wrong: If shooting in the studio is your thing, then strip lights will absolutely come in handy. But … Continue reading 8 Pieces of Photo Gear I Wish I Hadn’t Purchased

Artificial Intelligence Is Already Weirdly Inhuman

ILLUSTRATION BY EDWARD KINSELLA III What kind of world is our code creating? By David Berreby Nineteen stories up in a Brooklyn office tower, the view from Manuela Veloso’s office—azure skies, New York Harbor, the Statue of Liberty—is exhilarating. But right now we only have eyes for the nondescript windows below us in the tower across the street. In their panes, we can see chairs, desks, lamps, and papers. They don’t look quite right, though, because they aren’t really there. The genuine objects are in a building on our side of the street—likely the one where we’re standing. A bright … Continue reading Artificial Intelligence Is Already Weirdly Inhuman

UK group raps food giants for ‘shocking’ animal tests

British group censures multinational food industries over their ‘cruel’ animal testing. (file photo) A British advocacy group has condemned international food giants for carrying out ‘shocking’ animal tests to gain and maximize their profits. Cruelty Free International, a London-based animal protection and advocacy group which campaigns for the abolition of animal experiments, has in its latest report exposed cruel animal tests carried out by some of the world’s leading food companies: Danone, Nestlé and Yakult.  In an exposé published on the Sunday Express, the group said pet dogs, hamsters and pigs are being radiated, force-fed and subjected to tubes implanted … Continue reading UK group raps food giants for ‘shocking’ animal tests

Is Your Smartphone Aging Your Face Prematurely? 5 Maladies of the Digital Era

“Text neck” is for real. By Janet Allon / AlterNet Face it, we’re all addicted to our electronic devices. You might know a few lonely holdouts, determined to stay detached and live off the grid, but their numbers are diminishing. Most of us are living in an ever more wired world, dependent on instantaneous communication and information, and at a panicky loss when we can’t find our smartphones. No one wants to hear it, but we’re paying a steep price for this behavior. Our tech habits are laying ruin to our physical and mental health and abilities. Being aware of … Continue reading Is Your Smartphone Aging Your Face Prematurely? 5 Maladies of the Digital Era

More than Forty Percent of American Children Are Living in Poverty

By Thomas Riggins A January 2015 report from Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health reveals that forty four percent of children (those under 18) are living in de facto poverty. The Federal Government issues an artificially low annual official poverty level that radically understates the real level of US poverty. For 2015 the official level of poverty for a family of four, for example, is roughly an income $24,000 a year or less. This is for a family with 2 adults and 2 children. This income figure, however, does not reveal the true level of poverty in the US … Continue reading More than Forty Percent of American Children Are Living in Poverty

Watch the ocean’s five islands of garbage form over the last 35 years

by Marcie Gainer “NASA sought to visualize the so-called ‘ocean garbage patches’ using data collected over 35 years in partnership with NOAA. The result is simply mesmerizing.” Or terrifying. via NASA: We wanted to see if we could visualize the so-called ocean garbage patches. We start with data from floating, scientific buoys that NOAA has been distributing in the oceans for the last 35-year represented here as white dots. Let’s speed up time to see where the buoys go… Since new buoys are continually released, it’s hard to tell where older buoys move to. Let’s clear the map and add … Continue reading Watch the ocean’s five islands of garbage form over the last 35 years

Nestle only pays $524 to extract 27,000,000 gallons of California drinking water

LAUREN LUCI/FLICKR BY CLAIRE BERNISH | ANTIMEDIA Los Angeles, CA —Nestle has found itself more and more frequently in the glare of the California drought-shame spotlight than it would arguably care to be — though not frequently enough, apparently, for the megacorporation to have spontaneously sprouted a conscience. Drought-shaming worked sufficiently enough for Starbucks to stop bottling water in the now-arid state entirely, uprooting its operations all the way to Pennsylvania. But Nestle simply shrugged off public outrage and then upped the ante by increasing its draw from natural springs — most notoriously in the San Bernardino National Forest — with anabsurdly expired permit. Because … Continue reading Nestle only pays $524 to extract 27,000,000 gallons of California drinking water