Archive for 3 de February de 2017


warrior

http://lifehacker.com/the-problem-with-being-too-agreeable-1791893359

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by Lance Schuttler, Guest, Waking Times

474 people have been arrested in California in a 3 day sting operation called “Operation Reclaim and Rebuild.” Over 30 federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and task forces participated in the operation, which saved 28 children and 27 adults.

“You are worthy of more. And we will work tirelessly with our partners…to provide you services and help you rebuild your life,” Sheriff Jim McDonald said, addressing the victims during a news conference on Tuesday.

While this is a massive success for the movement to end human and child trafficking, there remains much work to be done. This huge operation will once again bring more conversation around this topic and the need for this issue to be taken even more seriously by the public. Child and human trafficking is extremely real and is prevalent, even in higher levels of governance, politics and finance.

This latest operation makes it clear too that the alleged Pizza-gate story is one that should not be dismissed without due investigation. We can’t just ignorantly dismiss something because we don’t want to believe it isn’t happening and that it might involve high level politicians and well-known elites. We as a society owe all victims of this terrible crime thorough investigations into possible or suspected trafficking cases.

With that said, even if a person doesn’t believe there is a Pizza-gate happening, the topic and conversation itself deserves attention and proper investigation. Remember, there has been no official investigation one way or the other regarding the alleged Pizza-gate story that broke due to Wikileaks release of emails from John Podesta back in October 2016.

We must also remember back to when it was alleged that former BBC broadcaster Jimmy Savile was sexually abusing children, but was put off as a “conspiracy theory” only until after he died, when literally hundreds of people came forward to prove that he did sexually abuse children.

Additionally, over the years, the Vatican has paid nearly $4 billion dollars to victims of pedophilia, which stemmed from clergy members abusing children. When it comes to the elite, it doesn’t get much higher than the Vatican. If the Vatican is involved, there are certainly lower level, but still powerful, groups and organizations involved. The lies and cover-ups are unraveling.

Back in November of 2016, there were also two famous UK footballers who went public with information relating to sexual abuse they suffered as children at the hands of elites within the UK football circles.

Also back in the Fall of 2016, the FBI rescued 82 children in a nationwide child-trafficking sting operation.

The Bigger Picture

What we’ve seen in recent months is this topic not only being discussed by many more people around the world, but we are seeing rescues and the truth of the situation come to light. We are seeing more momentum around this topic. Certainly, at some point the right dot will connect and it will bring down very well-known people and organizations. Additionally, the more arrests that are made, the more likely that one of those people will also be connected with some powerful people and organizations. Let’s hope that those arrested spill the beans on everything they know and everyone who has been or is involved.

Again, this is a very positive sign for all people involved and for humanity itself. The terrible crimes of human and child trafficking are coming to light. And because more is coming out, it prepares the world for even darker revelations about child trafficking and the global elite syndicate. Fascinating times we are in.

About the Author
Lance Schuttler graduated from the University of Iowa with a degree in Health Science-Health Coaching and offers health coaching services through his website Orgonlight Health. You can follow the Orgonlight Health Facebook page or visit the website for more information on how to receive health coaching for yourself, your friend or family member as well as view other inspiring articles.
Like Waking Times on Facebook. Follow Waking Times on Twitter.
This article (474 Arrested, 28 Children Rescued in California Child-Trafficking Sting) was originally created and published by The Mind Unleashed and is re-posted here with permission. 
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 Fisher_BR-3

Willpower is a dangerous, old idea that needs to be scrapped.

By Carl Erik Fisher

Thomas1 was a highly successful and mild-mannered lawyer who was worried about his drinking. When he came to see me at my psychotherapy practice, his wine intake had crept up to six or seven glasses a night, and he was starting to hide it from his family and to feel the effects at work. We discussed treatment strategies and made an appointment to meet again. But when he returned two weeks later, he was despondent: His drinking was totally unchanged.

“I just couldn’t cut back. I guess I just don’t have the willpower.”

Another patient of mine, John, also initially came to me for help with drinking. At our first meeting, we talked about moderation-based approaches and setting a healthier limit. But one month later, he came back to my office declaring that he had changed his mind and made peace with his drinking habits. Sure, his wife wasn’t always thrilled with how much he drank, he told me, and occasionally the hangovers were pretty bad, but his relationship was still fairly solid and drinking didn’t cause any truly significant problems in his life.

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Barry Rosenthal / Getty Image

In the abstract, John and Thomas are similar: They both succumbed to short-term temptations, and both didn’t keep their long-term goals. But while Thomas attributed that outcome to problems with willpower, John came to reframe his behavior from a perspective that sidestepped the concept of willpower altogether. Both John and Thomas would resolve their issues, but in very different ways.

Most people feel more comfortable with Thomas’ narrative. They would agree with his self-diagnosis (that he lacked willpower), and might even call it clear-eyed and courageous. Many people might also suspect that John’s reframing of his problem was an act of self-deception, serving to hide a real problem. But Thomas’ approach deserves just as much skepticism as John’s. It’s entirely possible that Thomas was seduced by the near-mystical status that modern culture has assigned to the idea of willpower itself—an idea that, ultimately, was working against him.

Ignoring the idea of willpower will sound absurd to most patients and therapists, but, as a practicing addiction psychiatrist and an assistant professor of clinical psychiatry, I’ve become increasingly skeptical about the very concept of willpower, and concerned by the self-help obsession that surrounds it. Countless books and blogs offer ways to “boost self-control,” or even to “meditate your way to more willpower,” but what’s not widely recognized is that new research has shown some of the ideas underlying these messages to be inaccurate.

More fundamentally, the common, monolithic definition of willpower distracts us from finer-grained dimensions of self-control and runs the danger of magnifying harmful myths—like the idea that willpower is finite and exhaustible. To borrow a phrase from the philosopher Ned Block, willpower is a mongrel concept, one that connotes a wide and often inconsistent range of cognitive functions. The closer we look, the more it appears to unravel. It’s time to get rid of it altogether.

Ideas about willpower and self-control have deep roots in western culture, stretching back at least to early Christianity, when theologians like Augustine of Hippo used the idea of free will to explain how sin could be compatible with an omnipotent deity. Later, when philosophers turned their focus away from religion, Enlightenment-era thinkers, particularly David Hume, labored to reconcile free will with the ascendant idea of scientific determinism.

The specific conception of “willpower,” however, didn’t emerge until the Victorian Era, as described by contemporary psychology researcher Roy Baumeister in his book Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength. During the 19th century, the continued waning of religion, huge population increases, and widespread poverty led to social anxieties about whether the growing underclass would uphold proper moral standards. Self-control became a Victorian obsession, promoted by publications like the immensely popular 1859 book Self-Help, which preached the values of  “self-denial” and untiring perseverance. The Victorians took an idea directly from the Industrial Revolution and described willpower as a tangible force driving the engine of our self-control. The willpower-deficient were to be held in contempt. The earliest use of the word, in 1874 according to the Oxford English Dictionary, was in reference to moralistic worries about substance use: “The drunkard … whose will-power and whose moral force have been conquered by degraded appetite.”

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The British Library / flickr

In the early 20th century, when psychiatry was striving to establish itself as a legitimate, scientifically based field, Freud developed the idea of a “superego.” The superego is the closest psychoanalytic cousin to willpower, representing the critical and moralizing part of the mind internalized from parents and society. It has a role in basic self-control functions—it expends psychic energy to oppose the id—but it is also bound up in wider ethical and value-based judgments. Even though Freud is commonly credited with discarding Victorian mores, the superego represented a quasi-scientific continuation of the Victorian ideal. By mid-century, B.F. Skinner was proposing that there is no internally based freedom to control behavior. Academic psychology turned more toward behaviorism, and willpower was largely discarded by the profession…

more…

http://nautil.us/issue/45/power/against-willpower

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 Art by Paul Rand from Little 1 by Ann Rand, a vintage concept book about the numbers

“If you look at zero you see nothing; but look through it and you will see the world.”

If the ancient Arab world had closed its gates to foreign travelers, we would have no medicine, no astronomy, and no mathematics — at least not as we know them today.

Central to humanity’s quest to grasp the nature of the universe and make sense of our own existence is zero, which began in Mesopotamia and spurred one of the most significant paradigm shifts in human consciousness — a concept first invented (or perhaps discovered) in pre-Arab Sumer, modern-day Iraq, and later given symbolic form in ancient India. This twining of meaning and symbol not only shaped mathematics, which underlies our best models of reality, but became woven into the very fabric of human life, from the works of Shakespeare, who famously winked at zero in King Lear by calling it “an O without a figure,” to the invention of the bit that gave us the 1s and 0s underpinning my ability to type these words and your ability to read them on this screen.

Mathematician Robert Kaplan chronicles naught’s revolutionary journey in The Nothing That Is: A Natural History of Zero (public library). It is, in a sense, an archetypal story of scientific discovery, wherein an abstract concept derived from the observed laws of nature is named and given symbolic form. But it is also a kind of cross-cultural fairy tale that romances reason across time and space

Kaplan writes:

If you look at zero you see nothing; but look through it and you will see the world. For zero brings into focus the great, organic sprawl of mathematics, and mathematics in turn the complex nature of things. From counting to calculating, from estimating the odds to knowing exactly when the tides in our affairs will crest, the shining tools of mathematics let us follow the tacking course everything takes through everything else – and all of their parts swing on the smallest of pivots, zero

With these mental devices we make visible the hidden laws controlling the objects around us in their cycles and swerves. Even the mind itself is mirrored in mathematics, its endless reflections now confusing, now clarifying insight.

[…]

As we follow the meanderings of zero’s symbols and meanings we’ll see along with it the making and doing of mathematics — by humans, for humans. No god gave it to us. Its muse speaks only to those who ardently pursue her.

With an eye to the eternal question of whether mathematics is discovered or invented — a question famously debated by Kurt Gödel and the Vienna Circle — Kaplan observes:

The disquieting question of whether zero is out there or a fiction will call up the perennial puzzle of whether we invent or discover the way of things, hence the yet deeper issue of where we are in the hierarchy. Are we creatures or creators, less than – or only a little less than — the angels in our power to appraise?

Art by Shel Silverstein from The Missing Piece Meets the Big O

Like all transformative inventions, zero began with necessity — the necessity for counting without getting bemired in the inelegance of increasingly large numbers. Kaplan writes:

Zero began its career as two wedges pressed into a wet lump of clay, in the days when a superb piece of mental engineering gave us the art of counting.

The story begins some 5,000 years ago with the Sumerians, those lively people who settled in Mesopotamia (part of what is now Iraq). When you read, on one of their clay tablets, this exchange between father and son: “Where did you go?” “Nowhere.” “Then why are you late?”, you realize that 5,000 years are like an evening gone.

The Sumerians counted by 1s and 10s but also by 60s. This may seem bizarre until you recall that we do too, using 60 for minutes in an hour (and 6 × 60 = 360 for degrees in a circle). Worse, we also count by 12 when it comes to months in a year, 7 for days in a week, 24 for hours in a day and 16 for ounces in a pound or a pint. Up until 1971 the British counted their pennies in heaps of 12 to a shilling but heaps of 20 shillings to a pound.

Tug on each of these different systems and you’ll unravel a history of customs and compromises, showing what you thought was quirky to be the most natural thing in the world. In the case of the Sumerians, a 60-base (sexagesimal) system most likely sprang from their dealings with another culture whose system of weights — and hence of monetary value — differed from their own…

more…

https://www.brainpickings.org/

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