The Worst Job I Ever Had: Working in a Call Center for a Cell Phone Company

by John McDermott

It was four straight hours of listening to complaints, a lunch break, and then another four hours on the phone.

Lucas McDaniel, 31, Bloomington, Indiana

Current Job: IT Technician at Indiana University
Worst Job Ever: Customer service representative for a large cell-phone plan provider

How I got in

I was just out of college, struggling to find a job, and expenses were piling up — student loans, rent, utilities, food, car insurance. I felt the walls closing in and knew I had to find a job, any job.

I decided to apply for a job at a call center, answering customer service calls for a large telecom provider. The place had a bad reputation — a couple friends had worked there and told me, “It sucks, but it’s a job.” Which was my exact mindset heading in.

All I had to do was walk in and fill out the application. The next week they invited all the new applicants in for a mass interview, and if you made it that far, you were basically hired.

We had about eight weeks of training, all of it paid at $8 per hour. The training consisted of the new crop of employees sitting in a room for eight hours a day, looking at PowerPoint slides and listening to recordings of people dealing with customers.

Fewer and fewer people showed up over the course of training. They got a couple paychecks, then bailed. It was demoralizing. I had just earned an engineering degree from a four-year university, and here I was among a bunch of high-school dropouts.

The last week of training was spent on the floor, where we watched customer service reps field actual calls from customers. I learned more that week than I did the previous seven. All the other training was a waste.

When I realized it was going to suck

That’s when I realized I was totally unprepared for the job. I watched the customer service reps log their call information in the internal software system, and quickly realized I had no idea how to use it. “What did you just do?” I asked them. “We didn’t go over that in training.”

“Ask your supervisor,” they’d say.

The supervisor said if we had any questions, we should just look it up in the internal learning database and follow the script. But the database didn’t account for most of the situations the customers described. Or the customer would give a response not included in the script, and we’d be left flying blind.

I often had to put the customer on hold just so I could call over a supervisor and ask them what to say.

There were about 500, 600 people on the call center floor at once. It was a wide-open warehouse, with rows of cubicles, 10 to each row. The partitions between them were small, so our calls often bled into each other’s. I worked nights, and it was miserable going from fluorescent lighting to utter darkness.

Our base pay was $9.50 an hour, but you could make up to $12 if you stuck it out long enough. Promotions were on a merit system. You were judged harshly by the customer satisfaction surveys conducted after each call. If you weren’t able to fix someone’s problem, even if you followed the script, the customer would rate you low and ruin your chance for a raise or bonus…

more…

https://melmagazine.com/the-worst-job-i-ever-had-working-in-a-call-center-for-a-cell-phone-company-b5dd66d4a097#.qgb0pyv8p

WIKK WEB GURU

 

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