We Are Walking a Tightrope Through Chaos

by Julian Rose, Contributor, Waking Times

Rational observation leads one to be unable to deny the undeniable: the toxic burden now being carried by the Earth’s atmosphere, living matter, animals and humans, has taken us all to the brink of apocalypse.

Yet, in spite of evidential states of dramatic damage to the fabric of life on Earth, radiantly beautiful children are birthing on this planet every day, as if in defiant declarations of the power of life over death.

These children are arriving even as nuclear reactors leak, catch fire and melt down, depositing their deadly radioactive isotopes around the planet. Even as a persistent drum beat ‘for war’ reverberates across continents and seas. Even as mind numbed and micro-chipped robotic humans blunder blindly onwards towards their slavish epiphany. Even as the skies are torn apart by streams of aluminum sulphate nano particles, and depleted uranium continues its mission as a weapon of mass destruction, to rip the very heart out of the warm corpuscles of life.

Yes, in spite of these – and so many more – acts of political, military and corporate sabotage upon the sentient veins of sacred living matter, the children of genius keep coming. And quantum physics reveals the absolute inter-connectivity of the diversity of all life, and how we are one. All one.

While plants and animals suffer the fate of being genetically engineered into new species, further denaturing an already deformed environment, the humble element of water is revealed to be a crystalline gift of the gods with exceptional powers to sooth and heal.

It is an extraordinary time on this blessed beleaguered planet. Resonant with extremes. Extremes that squeeze us and squeeze us, either into acts of submission or acts of rebellion and revolution, born of revelation.

We who are ‘alive’ choose rebellion. A passionate refusal to give-in. However, in order to make our rebellion into something capable of moving forward, manifesting itself as positive action in the here and now, it becomes all important to retain focus and not be pulled out of line by that which manifests as the crazed daily reality.

So let us be aware: we are up against a gathering storm of politically led divisiveness , and as a consequence, are being blinded by a confusion of emotive, violent, media manipulated images; blind and bigoted rhetoric, ‘fake news’ and a deluge of acts of narcissistic criminal self-indulgence.

We are faced by ‘legalized corruption’ becoming the common code of governments across the world.

‘Democracy’ is morphing into totalitarian centralization, in which the ‘executive’ takes unto itself the right to enact laws that grant, a priori, exclusive powers to the state or premier; including establishing a ‘snoopers charter’ to cover total surveillance of citizens’ activities.

But even as this is happening, higher levels of consciousness are rising up to counteract the all-out drive for the rule of fascism. At the time of writing, the Schumann Resonance is peaking at 40Hz +. A substantial increase in recent levels of between 7.8 and 15 Hz. Many believe this frequency rate to be directly correlated with an upward trend in spirit oriented energies supporting mankind’s liberation from the yoke of absolute autocratic control.

The confusion manifesting here and now on this planet, takes the form of an orchestrated war, enacted by global institutions and governments, to remove the last vestiges of what we have come to call our ‘civil liberties’. Diversity and individuality are being eaten-up by perversity and conformity. Large corporations get larger still, swallowing competitors as they go. Governments, I repeat, deftly take unto themselves ever more authority to control, with incremental accumulations of power being seized almost at will.

The centralized super-state looms ever nearer, under the moniker of organized protection against a rise in ‘terrorism’. Yes, the very terrorism which the state itself instigated by embarking on violent invasions of foreign territories and massive sales of armaments to those willing to work for illegitimate ‘regime change’.

Back on home turf, crusading armies of ‘believers’ in this that and the other, slug it out in an orchestrated war of ‘left’ versus ‘right’. Extreme left versus extreme right. Nationalists versus federalists. Globalists versus populists. Divide and conquer, stoked into an all-consuming fire of blind attrition. Attrition created and financed by the planet’s dominant architects of control…

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About the Author
Julian Rose is an early pioneer of UK organic farming, international activist and author. Contact Julian at www.julianrose.info to find out more. He is President of The International Coalition to Protect the Polish Countryside, and is the author of two books with some very powerful perspectives: Changing Course for Life and In Defence of Life.
This article (We Are Walking a Tightrope Through Chaos) was originally created and published by Julian Rose and is re-posted here with permission. It may be re-posted freely with proper attribution, author bio, and this copyright statement.

https://aeon.co/essays/how-ambient-music-can-help-ease-the-trauma-of-the-icu

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Tripping in the ICU

Resultado de imagem para At the Robert Ballanger hospital's Intensive

At the Robert Ballanger hospital’s Intensive Care Unit, France. Photo by Amelie Benoiste/SPL

For those suffering the trauma of intensive care, the soothing swoosh of otherworldly ambient music can be a welcome gift

by Charles Fernyhough is a British writer and psychologist, and his latest book is The Voices Within (2016). He is a part-time professor of psychology at Durham University, with interests in child development, memory and hallucinations. Listen here to an excerpt of Darkroom’s concert for intensive care.

It’s an odd gig, even for musicians who are used to some odd venues. For one thing, we can’t see our audience. It’s not that we haven’t attracted many people, so much as that our listeners are in another building. They are lying in hospital beds next door, and they are connected up to machines. Some of them are quite close to death. They are listening – those who have chosen to – on iPads linked to the ward’s WiFi, which is transmitting our live audio stream. Although the music is being broadcast on the internet, it is intended only for one group of people: the patients, carers and staff of the Critical Care Unit at University College Hospital, London (UCH).

The invitations promise ‘a performance of ambient and electronic music’. We had them printed up on good-quality card, and spent half an hour tucking them into cheerful lime-green envelopes. My colleague Nina and I went round the ward earlier, asking those patients who were awake if they wanted to listen, and handing out brand-new headphones and carefully sterilised iPads. The concert has been trailed for several months, but some of the staff need reminders of what is going on. There are emergencies unfolding everywhere. An intensive care unit (ICU), I am learning, is a lively mix of high-tech medicine and the shouty dynamics of a trading floor. We know that the success of our art project is way down the list of priorities.

Darkroom, with Peter Chilvers and Charles Fernyhough, performing for patients and staff of the Critical Care Unit at University College London Hospital, May 2016.

The concert is slated to start at 1pm. At 12:59 some of us are still stuck in the basement of the Wellcome Trust, across the road from the hospital, trying to find a lift big enough to shift a cart of music gear up to the fifth floor. It’s all a bit Spinal Tap. Thankfully, Peter is already plugged in upstairs, and he starts the show with some airy pan drums conjured from his iPad. The rest of us are drilled in setting up quickly, and we are soon wrapping other sounds around his reflective beats. There are guitars, a sax, a flute, a bass clarinet and Os’s modular synth, with cables and switchboard like an old-fashioned telephone exchange. We’re making enough noise to be heard on the adjoining floors, and yet, if we move towards each other, we can still talk while we’re playing. Our audience can’t hear that. Despite stringent tests of the technology, we don’t actually know if anyone can hear anything. All that matters, really, is that we’re doing it. For a couple of hours on a wet Tuesday afternoon, we are putting something out there that is not just about keeping some very sick people alive. It is trivial, ephemeral, vanished into air, but for the moment it feels like the most important thing we could be doing.

Intensive care is no place for the faint-hearted. Improvements in medical technology, particularly the development of the modern positive pressure ventilator, have transformed our efforts at the boundary between life and death. A few decades ago, many of the people in that ward next door would already be dead.

But progress comes at a cost. The noise of life-support machines and vital-sign monitors is a constant background. Phones ring, bin lids bang, staff call for help and doctors are constantly being paged to the next emergency. The racket frequently exceeds World Health Organisation (WHO) guidelines for safe noise levels. In The Guardian in 2016, Helen Taylor, an intensive care survivor, described a ‘constant, frightening’ noise from which there was little respite at night. It’s one reason why a recent article likened the modern ICU to ‘a branch of hell’.

The chaotic atmosphere was less of a problem 10 years ago. If I had stepped next door then, there would have been few patients awake to disturb. The standard approach, while life-saving procedures were being administered, was heavy sedation. While the machine was being fixed, the patient was put into a coma.

That changed with the recognition that, inside those ravaged, intubated bodies, minds were still working. And those minds were not at ease. The British journalist David Aaronovitch had a stint in intensive care after routine keyhole surgery went disastrously wrong. He heard people behind a curtain railing violently against him. As his disorientation deepened, he started to believe that the sinister officers of the night shift were preparing his body for human consumption. They were feeding him oxygen in order to make his flesh sweeter. He was going to be eaten…

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https://aeon.co/essays/how-ambient-music-can-help-ease-the-trauma-of-the-icu

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‘I Have a Headache’ and Other Signs You’re in a Barren Sexual Wasteland

Brian VanHooker

How you can tell you’re in a sexless relationship (and how to fix it)

Relationship counselors might tell you, in comforting tones, that it’s natural for passion to fade over time, and that it’s slowly replaced with things like comfort and trust and emotional intimacy. That’s great and all, but what happens if what you really need right now is a good fuck? What if, while trying to hold your family together, you’re silently clawing your own eyeballs out, trapped in the relentless cycle of frustration and resentment that comes with the dreaded sexless relationship? It’s a cliché from the depths of sitcom hell, but it’s one that many people are living. We spoke to a relationship expert about how it happens and how to break the sexless cycle.

How Few Times Do You Need to Have Sex to Be Considered Sexless?

According to psychologists interviewed by Newsweek, the most commonly agreed-upon standard for defining a sexless relationship is a couple who has sex fewer than 10 times per year. So if you’re not having sex around once a month (the average couple fucks at least twice a week), you can consider your relationship to be officially “sexless.” But take some comfort in knowing that you’re far from alone: According to psychologists, as many as 15 to 20 percent of couples are living like this.

As with anything to do with sex, official numbers aside, it really boils down to whether or not the needs of each partner are being met. Per psychotherapist and relationship expert Lisa White, it also might be more important to pay attention to the trend lines — i.e., once you see the normal amount of sex in your relationship decreasing, it’s vital to figure out the reason why. Similarly, she says it’s important not to fool yourself into believing that it’s just a temporary drought — if you or your partner have been “just too tired” for longer than three months, you’ve got serious cause for concern.

How a Sexless Relationship Happens

According to White, there are a bunch of reasons men and women might stop sleeping with each other. One of the biggest causes is simply that people change over time, and the person you’re with now may not be the same as the person you started out with. “Sometimes, relationships evolve, but people don’t evolve with the relationship,” says White.

This is especially true if one partner has, over time, developed a taste for a specific type of sex that their partner doesn’t like or want to explore. More to the point, the evolution of sexual taste is a natural part of aging; for example, many of those who are into BDSM don’t discover their kink (or at least, don’t act on it) until they’re well into their 30s. Some people even begin to find themselves becoming more attracted to the same sex later in life which, naturally, can be hell on a marriage.

But why does this happen? According to White, a lot of it has to do with how we grow to accept ourselves as we age. “As you get older, people are more comfortable with their bodies, and especially when people enter their 40s, they begin to reflect on what they’ve done, or haven’t done, and they begin to feel their mortality,” she explains.

Of course, the reasons for sex slowly disappearing from your relationship can also be far more simple — and emotional: “Maybe there’s something both people are mad at, but they won’t resolve,” says White…

more…

https://melmagazine.com/i-have-a-headache-and-other-signs-you-re-in-a-barren-sexual-wasteland-e87c520301f#.8c25lsm5v

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