The Smartphone Effect (And Why We’re All Addicted)

BY TOVA KRAKAUER Most of us know the tug of a new SMS message or a notification from Facebook which comes with the ever-present smartphone.  But most of us don’t know – until it’s taken away – how powerful that tug really is.  I recently left my phone in the Athens airport: for at least a few weeks, I went to sleep without a phone beside me. I was surprised by how potently I felt the difference.  The itch to check just one more app became defunct.  There were only two choices once in bed – read, or drift off to … Continue reading The Smartphone Effect (And Why We’re All Addicted)

How Syria Came to This

Hosam Katan / Reuters A story of ethnic and sectarian conflict, international connivance, and above all civilian suffering by ANDREW TABLER Seven years of horrific twists and turns in the Syrian Civil War make it hard to remember that it all started with a little graffiti. In March 2011, four children in the southern city of Der’a scrawled on a wall “It’s your turn, Doctor”— a not so subtle prediction that the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, a British trained ophthalmologist and self-styled reformer, would go down in the the manner of the Ben Ali regime in Tunisia, the … Continue reading How Syria Came to This

EDGAR CAYCE MAY HAVE BEEN RIGHT ABOUT RUSSIA’S ROLE IN PREVENTING WORLD WAR III

by Dylan Charles, Editor Waking Times The U.S. has been attempting to enter Syria for almost five years now, and the chemical weapons pretext has been in play since the invasion of Iraq. We seem to be in a repeat cycle. Some kind of macabre Groundhog Day where no matter how many times we manage to survive the day, we keep waking up to the same twisted scenario. Retired General Wesley Clark told us over a decade ago of the military plan to invade Syria, and now in the Syrian theater, the drive to force Russia into retaliation against the U.S. is deadly persistent. This … Continue reading EDGAR CAYCE MAY HAVE BEEN RIGHT ABOUT RUSSIA’S ROLE IN PREVENTING WORLD WAR III