The Cultural Convictions That Land Some Animals on the Menu

CHRIS KEANE / REUTERS … and keep others off of it by NICOLA TWILLEY, CYNTHIA GRABER and GASTROPOD In the West, when it comes to which meat is for dinner, we nearly always choose beef, pork, or chicken. Yet cows and pigs are only two of more than 5,000 species of mammals, and chicken is one of nearly 10,000 species of birds. Meanwhile, at different times in history and in different places around the world, people have enjoyed dining on all sorts of animals, from elephants to flamingos to jellyfish. So how do individuals and cultures decide which animals to eat, and which they don’t? And … Continue reading The Cultural Convictions That Land Some Animals on the Menu

How to Break Up with Integrity: Rilke on Unwounding Separation and the Difficult Art of Recalibrating Broken Relationships

Drawings by Reinhold Rudolf Junghanns “Nothing locks people in error as much as the daily repetition of error.” BY MARIA POPOVA We speak of love as a gift, but although it may come at first unbidden, as what Percy Shelley called a “speechless swoon of joy,” true intimacy between two people is a difficult achievement — a hard-earned glory with stakes so high that the prospect of collapse is absolutely devastating. When collapse does happen — when intimacy is severed by some disorienting swirl of chance and choice — the measure of a love is whether and to what extent … Continue reading How to Break Up with Integrity: Rilke on Unwounding Separation and the Difficult Art of Recalibrating Broken Relationships

THE SHAMANIC VIEW OF MENTAL HEALTH

by Jonathan Davis, Uplift Waking Times In November 2014 the peak psychology body in the UK, the British Psychological Association, released their new flagship report Understanding Psychosis and Schizophrenia. It was a watershed moment in the mainstream treatment of mental illness, containing statements such as this: Hearing voices or feeling paranoid are common experiences which can often be a reaction to trauma, abuse or deprivation. Calling them symptoms of mental illness, psychosis or schizophrenia is only one way of thinking about them, with advantages and disadvantages. ~The British Psychological Association: Understanding Psychosis and Schizophrenia With mental health problems reaching epidemic proportions in the UK and throughout the western world, … Continue reading THE SHAMANIC VIEW OF MENTAL HEALTH

How to Feed Your Family on $50 a Week

Another day, another politician who seems to have no idea what it’s like to eat while poor. Here’s my story. by Tracy Moore I grew up with a single mother who made $12,000 a year, which means for most of my life, Vienna sausages and the bologna with the red ring around it were a luxury. My sisters and I never saw a dentist until we were teenagers, or a real doctor before we were nearly 20. And yet, as a full-grown adult, having to support my partner and kid on a $50-a-week food budget was harder. Harder still? Hearing politicians continue to … Continue reading How to Feed Your Family on $50 a Week

Dignity is delicate

Renford McIntyre pictured in Dudley, England, after being declared an illegal immigrant despite 50 years of living and working in the UK. Photo by Andrew Testa/Panos Human dignity is a concept with remarkably shallow historical roots. Is that why it is so presently endangered? Remy Debes is associate professor of philosophy at the University of Memphis and the editor of The Southern Journal of Philosophy. He is the editor of Dignity: A History(2017), a volume of the Oxford Philosophical Concepts series and a project of the Center for New Narratives in Philosophy.  His new monograph (in progress) is entitled, Respect as Understanding. Edited by Sam Dresser … Continue reading Dignity is delicate

Can Humans Smell Cancer?

Unexpected findings as a Scottish “super smeller” sniffs cancer. by Chris Gilbert, M.D., Ph.D.  “Did you have red Tabasco sauce with your last meal?”  Joy asked me as my husband and I were driving her from San Francisco to Chico, California. I was surprised by her question.  I did have red Tabasco sauce the night before, but not more that 4 drops.  How could Joy have smelt it? “Yes”, I said, “but it was such a minuscule amount”.  “I can smell it” she commented laughing. The 3-hour car trip from San Francisco to Chico, California was off to a good start.  Joy was definitely an … Continue reading Can Humans Smell Cancer?

Trim and Fit? You May Still Have Heart Disease

CreditCreditGracia Lam By Jane E. Brody Lessons from Jane Brody’s brother: Having all the right cholesterol numbers and staying active is no guarantee your coronary arteries are in great shape. This is the story of my brother’s coronary bypass surgery. It contains three critically important messages: 1. Don’t assume that your coronary arteries are in great shape because your “numbers” are good, you’re taking the prescribed medications to keep them that way, you’re trim and athletic and you live a mostly heart-healthy life. 2. Don’t ignore or dismiss potential symptoms of coronary distress by assuming that muscle soreness, unusual stress or … Continue reading Trim and Fit? You May Still Have Heart Disease

Do Dogs Forget Their People?

Illustration: Chelsea Beck (Gizmodo) by Daniel Kolitz Let’s say your long-term relationship totally implodes. Browsing for a new apartment, or a therapist that takes your insurance, you hear your dog bark in the other room—and realize, with a start, that it’s not actually your dog. Once you’re all moved out, the dog will be out of your life, too. Stewing in self-pity you think—and subsequently become convinced—that this dog, who you’ve fed and bathed who knows how many times, and coined several adorable nicknames for, will forget you ever existed by the start of next spring. Probably, for your own health, … Continue reading Do Dogs Forget Their People?

Is your dog happy? Ten common misconceptions about dog behaviour

Dick – image edited by Fernando Kaskais  Authors Paul McGreevy Professor of Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare Science, University of Sydney Melissa Starling Postdoctoral researcher, University of Sydney Disclosure statement Paul McGreevy is the co-author of Making Dogs Happy. Melissa Starling is the co-author of Making Dogs Happy. It is difficult to refer to what dogs, as a collective, like and dislike and how they behave. Just as humans do, dogs all have their own personalities and learned preferences and so can differ dramatically in how they approach life and what they take from it. In our book, Making Dogs … Continue reading Is your dog happy? Ten common misconceptions about dog behaviour

Here’s How Long Common Drugs Stay in Your Body

Just in case you were wondering. by ERIN BRODWIN, DRAGAN RADOVANOVIC Contrary to what many advertised drug tests might promise, not all substances leave their telltale chemical signature in the body for the same amount of time. The moment we take a drug – whether we snort, smoke, or swallow it – our bodies begin to break it down. In the process, metabolites, or byproducts, of the drug are produced, which can linger in our blood, urine (and even in our hair) for long after the initial effects of the drug are felt. Traces of these metabolites are what drug … Continue reading Here’s How Long Common Drugs Stay in Your Body