Study: Suicide is Rarely Predicted By Assessing Suicidal Thoughts

By Traci Pedersen Many people who die by suicide denied having suicidal thoughts when asked directly by doctors in the months leading up to their deaths, according to a new meta-analysis at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Australia. The findings, published in the journal BJPsych Open, question the widely held belief that suicide can be predicted by psychiatrists and clinicians via a patient-risk assessment, especially in the short-term. For the analysis, the researchers reviewed data from 70 major studies of suicidal thoughts and found that, as a stand-alone test, only 1.7 percent of people with suicidal ideas died by … Continue reading Study: Suicide is Rarely Predicted By Assessing Suicidal Thoughts

WHY IS IT SUCH A TURNOFF WHEN SOMEONE TRULY, REALLY, ACTUALLY WANTS TO DATE ME?

Photo: Getty Images/ Matjaz Slanic by MARIA DEL RUSSO One of my father’s favorite refrains about my love life is that I only like men who don’t like me. He’s constantly joking that the easiest way for a man to turn me off is for him to show interest. Based on history, I do see where he’s coming from, but I’m still not totally convinced. Still, he does point out a polarizing, age-old issue: Is it true that the more someone is into us, the less into them we are? And if so, is a silly game of hard to … Continue reading WHY IS IT SUCH A TURNOFF WHEN SOMEONE TRULY, REALLY, ACTUALLY WANTS TO DATE ME?

Are Big Dogs Smarter Than Small Ones? Scientists Finally Have an Answer

UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA Bigger dogs, with larger brains, perform better than smaller pups on certain measures of intelligence, new research shows. Larger-brained dogs outperform smaller dogs on measures of executive functions – a set of cognitive processes that are necessary for controlling and coordinating other cognitive abilities and behaviors. In particular, bigger dogs have better short-term memory and self-control than smaller ones, according to the study in Animal Cognition. “The jury is out on why, necessarily, brain size might relate to cognition,” says lead study author Daniel Horschler, an anthropology doctoral student and member of the University of Arizona’s Arizona Canine … Continue reading Are Big Dogs Smarter Than Small Ones? Scientists Finally Have an Answer