‘We can’t go back to normal’: how will coronavirus change the world?

Times of upheaval are always times of radical change. Some believe the pandemic is a once-in-a-generation chance to remake society and build a better future. Others fear it may only make existing injustices worse. By Peter C Baker Everything feels new, unbelievable, overwhelming. At the same time, it feels as if we’ve walked into an old recurring dream. In a way, we have. We’ve seen it before, on TV and in blockbusters. We knew roughly what it would be like, and somehow this makes the encounter not less strange, but more so. Every day brings news of developments that, as recently … Continue reading ‘We can’t go back to normal’: how will coronavirus change the world?

COVID and Community

I WROTE THIS PIECE March 20–22, 2020. I wanted to make some sense of the COVID-19 crisis as I, and perhaps many others, were experiencing it just at that moment. That crisis is, of course, rapidly evolving, so the facts, opinions, interventions, and social practices reported here may well seem out of date by the time of reading. But I am also a historian and sociologist, and I refract real-time experiences through perspectives that are not so time-specific. I hope that this unstable juxtaposition of the transient and the durable will prove worthwhile: we will be passing through many future … Continue reading COVID and Community

Traumatised by the cure

Survivors of life-threatening illness can be left in profound fear and distress. Are they suffering from a form of PTSD? Liza Gross is a journalist, investigative reporter and author. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Discover, Scientific American and National Geographic’s News Watch, among others. Her latest book is The Science Writers’ Investigative Reporting Handbook: A Beginner’s Guide to Investigations (2018). She lives in Kensington, California. Edited by Pam Weintraub Noah Wolfson was just 12 when he learned he had cancer. What made his case unusual was his father’s response. Phil Wolfson, a psychiatrist in Marin County, California and veteran 1960s activist, mined not just … Continue reading Traumatised by the cure

The World Is Changing — So Can We

The pandemic is revealing the many ways our lives intersect. Is this an opportunity for us to reimagine what we can be? By: David Byrne I went for a long bike ride today. I needed to get out and clear my head. The sun was shining, daffodils were emerging along the riverside bike path, dogwood trees were in bloom and at one point I thought to myself, “Yeah, life goes on.”  Pretty corny, and maybe even a bit selfish given what so many people are going through right now. But maintaining the basic rhythms of life that remain available can give one … Continue reading The World Is Changing — So Can We

An LA Native Drives Us Through His Hometown — Using Google Street View

by SAMANTHA CLARK The sun shines as Felix Quintana cruises through South Central Los Angeles. He’s always been inspired by what he sees out of his car window, from the strip malls to the street vendors. “I love the hustle,” he says. “The hand-painted signs, the swap meets, the people making money washing windshields.” But those moments can fly by. And his ongoing series of cyanotypes make us pause on the often overlooked Angelenos who work and live in the less glitzy, more gritty neighborhoods of LA County. A multidisciplinary artist using his photographer’s eye, Quintana samples from the Google … Continue reading An LA Native Drives Us Through His Hometown — Using Google Street View

THE CULTURE OF FEAR: CORONAVIRUS AND THE HUMAN ANIMAL

by Steve Attridge, Guest Waking Times Fear is a weapon. It is also a deadly disease, far more potent than Corona virus. It also tells us much about our society, our relationships and ourselves. Fear inhibits thought, it restricts freedom, it limits imagination and it isolates us from each other and ultimately from ourselves. It is also a useful political and cultural tool to bend and even break people. A dictionary definition of fear is that it is an unpleasant emotion caused by the threat of danger, pain, or harm. So it is a mental state. An imaginary act, and the … Continue reading THE CULTURE OF FEAR: CORONAVIRUS AND THE HUMAN ANIMAL

The Rich Can’t Hide From a Plague. Just Ask Edgar Allan Poe.

In “The Masque of the Red Death,” the poor are sacrificed to disease so the rich can keep their comfortable lives. Sound familiar? By MAYA PHILLIPS “And Darkness and Decay and the Red Death held illimitable dominion over all” is the line that famously ends Edgar Allan Poe’s short story “The Masque of the Red Death,” a story that has been resurfacing again and again lately. On March 10, in a letter to the New York Times, a reader said that one article about the wealthy’s response to the virus reminded her of the story’s prince, partying in an abbey while destruction … Continue reading The Rich Can’t Hide From a Plague. Just Ask Edgar Allan Poe.

How sick will the coronavirus make you? The answer may be in your genes

By Jocelyn Kaiser Science’s COVID-19 reporting is supported by the Pulitzer Center. COVID-19, caused by the new pandemic coronavirus, is strangely—and tragically—selective. Only some infected people get sick, and although most of the critically ill are elderly or have complicating problems such as heart disease, some killed by the disease are previously healthy and even relatively young. Researchers are now gearing up to scour the patients’ genomes for DNA variations that explain this mystery. The findings could be used to identify those most at risk of serious illness and those who might be protected, and they might also guide the search … Continue reading How sick will the coronavirus make you? The answer may be in your genes

New research uncovers the psychological consequences of daily news exposure

BY BETH ELLWOOD  After being exposed to negative news, people report more negative affect and less positive affect. This is true even of everyday news, according to a study published in The British Psychological Society. In today’s world, news is everywhere. The authors explain, “People can be updated about the latest developments in the world during the entire day and seven days a week”. Not only is news almost inescapable, but it is predominantly negative. This is concerning since numerous studies have found evidence that negative news leads to unfavorable emotional states. Much of the previous research has looked at reactions to … Continue reading New research uncovers the psychological consequences of daily news exposure

Coronavirus Palermo, minacce di assalti ai supermercati, centri commerciali presidiati da polizia

Ieri un tentato assalto alla Lidl e alcuni episodi in piccoli alimentari nelle borgate. Intanto file ai supermercati perché domenica resteranno chiusi in tutta la Sicilia di Roberto Chifari Cresce la preoccupazione a Palermo, come in altre città del Sud. C’è il serio rischio che la mancanza di liquidità dovuta allo stop imposto dalle misure anti contagio porti allo scoppio di una bomba sociale. Lo sanno bene le istituzioni e le forze dell’ordine, che da 72 ore monitorano gruppi privati su Facebook e chat su Whatsapp dopo alcun allarmanti note vocali e video messaggi che circolano sui social, dove gruppi organizzati … Continue reading Coronavirus Palermo, minacce di assalti ai supermercati, centri commerciali presidiati da polizia