Thoreau on Nature and Human Nature, the Tonic of Wildness, and the Value of the Unexplored

“At the same time that we are earnest to explore and learn all things, we require that all things be mysterious and unexplorable.” BY MARIA POPOVA “We call it ‘Nature’; only reluctantly admitting ourselves to be ‘Nature’ too,” Denise Levertov wrote in her revelation of a poem “Sojourns in the Parallel World” a generation after history’s most poetic piece of legislature termed that parallel world “wilderness” and defined it as “an area where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man, where man* himself is a visitor who does not remain.” Those of us who visit wild places the way others visit … Continue reading Thoreau on Nature and Human Nature, the Tonic of Wildness, and the Value of the Unexplored

The clothing revolution

What if the need for fabric, not food, in the face of a changing climate is what first tipped humanity towards agriculture? by Ian Gilligan is a prehistorian at the University of Sydney. He is the author of Climate, Clothing, and Agriculture in Prehistory: Linking Evidence, Causes, and Effects (2019). Edited by Sam Dresser Archaeologists and other scientists are beginning to unravel the story of our most intimate technology: clothing. They’re learning when and why our ancestors first started to wear clothes, and how their adoption was crucial to the evolutionary success of our ancestors when they faced climate change on a massive … Continue reading The clothing revolution