HEART MEDICINE – AWAKENING AND RECONNECTING TO YOUR SOUL WITH THE SACRED PLANT IBOGA

by Dylan CharlesEditor Waking Times

“Man is a stream whose source is hidden. Our being is descending into us from we know not whence.” ~Ralph Waldo Emerson

If you could give the person that you loved most in all the world any gift you could possibly imagine, what gift would you choose? Would it be the same gift if the person you love most turned out to be yourself?

What would you say or ask of yourself if you had the full attention of every dimension of you? What is it that you’d like to know, and what is it that you’d like to share with your very own soul?

In the cultural absence of experiences which heal and renew, we are in a crisis of ill-being. With little footing in the world of spirit, we constantly burrow ourselves deeper into the void within, while always trying to fill that void with whatever materials we can find. Past traumas and unresolved doubts and fears are buried here, going unacknowledged to fester as wounds which carry us ever further away from our soul’s purpose, clouding the path and leaving open the door to self-destruction.

“The [Bwiti] Fang believe each person is made of a body and a soul. The soul gives life to the body. Therefore, when the body dies, the soul lives on. Ancestors are believed to possess even more power as spirits than they had as living people. This is particularly true if the dead had lived honorably and had died in a similar fashion.” [Source]

Face-to face reconnection with the soul is possible, however, with a shamanic plant medicine from the rainforests of Western Africa, iboga. It is the sacrament of the Bwiti, a thriving spiritual tradition which uses this hallucinogenic plant as a means of communing with one’s soul and with the soul’s of our ancestors. It’s not a religion, rather, more of a study of life itself, and the purity of its message is universal. Life is a gift. We ourselves are nature. Happiness is an inside job. There is but one truth.

“From the Bwiti tradition of Africa, we know that each of our lives is a gift from our creator. And we know that when we are born, we are also given everything we need to live and to create a good life for ourselves, one filled with happiness. When we value our life experience and are deeply thankful for the gift of Life, it leads us to a deeper connection with our soul, our personal guide through life. Through guidance from our soul, we take action to create what needs to be done to be happy.” -Gary Cook, Iboga Wellness

The Bwiti believe the answers to our questions about life are found within, and with iboga as the guide, the journey in search of truth begins with a face-to-face encounter with the over soul, that infinite part of us which carries the entire contents of our many lives, our accumulated knowledge, and our storybook of personal experience.

The ceremony is conducted under the care of experienced shamans and providers whose role it is assist the initiate in learning how to navigate the dream-like state of iboga. Similar to astral travel, once the participant is fully detoxed and the mind’s eye is fully activated, the attendant provider talks them through an exploration of their deepest questions about life.

Beginning at home, the seeker is instructed to look around in search of their self, who is often found in a bedroom or an office carrying on with some ordinary task. The initiate speaks aloud to this cosmic version of themselves, striking up a conversation.

It is here, in this first encounter with the infinite version of one’s self that a profound truth is revealed; the truth about one’s relationship with their own soul. In our modern world of addiction, abuse and silent suffering, it is quite common that the soul has been so thoroughly ignored or abused in day-to-day life that it simply will not communicate with the seeker, often turning away, running away, or simply refusing to respond. In this moment exists the greatest potential for personal healing, for the soul is pressed to come nearer, to reply and to forgive.

“As the experience deepens, the barrier between the conscious and sub-conscious mind seems to dissolve, and the information in the sub-conscience becomes available for review and rejection by the reflective self. In this, a lifetime’s worth of learned mental processes, memories, emotional impressions, false judgments and psychological conditioning that combine to inform and instruct the self are presented to the patient in rapid fire fashion… a sort of high velocity behind-the-scenes tour of one’s personality. A multi-dimensional impression of one’s character emerges, and they are given an incredible opportunity to re-assess or reject misunderstood feelings, traumatic events, implanted suggestions, negative self-images, and habitual behaviors.” -Dylan Charles, Opiates, Iboga and the Roots of Self-Destruction

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About the Authors 
Dylan Charles is a student and teacher of Shaolin Kung Fu, Tai Chi and Qi Gong, a practitioner of Yoga and Taoist esoteric arts, and an activist and idealist passionately engaged in the struggle for a more sustainable and just world for future generations. He is the editor of WakingTimes.com, the proprietor of OffgridOutpost.com, a grateful father and a man who seeks to enlighten others with the power of inspiring information and action. His remarkable journey of self-transformation is a testament to the power of the will and the persistence of the human spirit. He may be contacted at wakingtimes@gmail.com.
Image: Chor Boogie, From Africa With Love
This article (Heart Medicine – Awakening and Reconnecting to Your Soul with the Sacred Plant Iboga) was originally created and published by Waking Times and is published here under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Dylan Charles and WakingTimes.com. It may be re-posted freely with proper attribution, author bio, and this copyright statement.

http://www.wakingtimes.com/2017/08/01/heart-medicine-awakening-reconnecting-to-your-soul/

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Going Undercover With Africa’s Premier Anti-Poaching Unit

Images from the raid, where the Zambian, despite having one hand already cuffed, resists arrest.

Busting open the black-market ivory trade in Malawi and Zambia

by Joseph Haldeman

In a pink motel room just a few miles from the ZambiaMalawi border in landlocked Southeastern Africa, two European men count stacks of local currency across a floral bedspread: 10,000, 20,000, 30,000, 40,000, 50,000 Zambian kwacha, which comes out to roughly $5,000.

A third man watches like a casino pit boss from a plastic armchair, his foot resting on a giant suitcase. He’s a wealthy Zambian with a body builder’s physique, gold jewelry and designer pink polo shirt. He keeps checking his phone and telling the other men to hurry up.

“I lost count again,” one of them, Matthieu, responds in a thick French accent.

All of a sudden, two plainclothes police officers storm through the doors pointing AK-47s in all directions.

Matthieu and his partner Mark, a tall lean Brit, take their cue and jump. Even with one of them on his back and a taser to his chest, the Zambian still lands several punches before slamming into the bathroom sink, knocking it off the wall with his hip. Matthieu’s shirt rips during the scuffle, exposing a giant tattoo of the French Airborne Paratroopers’ emblem over his heart.

“Give up! There’s a whole team outside!” Mark yells.

A policeman fires a warning shot outside, and the Zambian quits resisting.

Police discover two more accomplices in the motel parking lot as they attempt to flee in a silver Corolla. One of them is merely a driver, but the other is Bridget Banda, a well-connected figure in Zambia’s judicial system. The police instantly recognize her from a print-out of her WhatsApp profile photo, taken from the personal account she used to arrange the entire deal with Matthieu over months of correspondence.

Unlike the Zambian, Bridget and her driver don’t resist. In handcuffs, they’re led into the motel room.

Bridget Banda, who is the architect of the ivory deal, pictured with her two accomplices and the 80 pounds of ivory they intended to sell.

Matthieu finally sorts through the giant tarpaulin. One by one, he pulls out the long, tapering objects contained inside — each of which is cream-colored and caked with the rust brown of African soil, blood or both.

“Nine tusks.”

That adds up to about 80 pounds of illegal ivory, which in Hong Kong, the world’s largest ivory market, will fetch nearly $40,000. There, the tusks are polished white and carved into necklaces, combs, alligators, Buddhas, and of course, elephants, before being sold in one of the hundreds of retailers across the city.

“Four and a half pairs. That’s at least five dead elephants,” Mark says.

One of the tusks is smaller than the others.

“A female?”

A police officer shakes his head.

“A younger one.”

Last September, The Great Elephant Census—a research organization funded by Paul G. Allen, the internationally renowned philanthropist and co-founder of Microsoft, published the most extensive study of the African elephant to date. The report (a result of 9,700 hours of flight surveys over 18 counties) estimated a loss of 144,000 Savanna elephants in just seven years. Almost a third of the entire population had vaporized due to poaching. One of the nations hit hardest was Malawi, where Matthieu and Mark currently work.

According to the World Bank’s GDP per capita ratings, Malawi is the fifth-poorest nation on the planet. Making matters worse, last year, a global El Niñobrought a significant drought to Southern Africa that devastated Malawi’s small agrarian economy, crippled the production of its key export (tobacco) and drove up the price of the staple of its diet (corn). It also meant fewer watering holes in the county’s expansive national parks, condensing the migration of its wildlife.

So not only is poaching a tempting way to make money, it’s far easier than usual, too. In Kasungu National Park, for instance, only one vast watering hole remains in the entire 900-square-mile reserve. Two large elephant families visit it around 11 a.m. every single day.

They’re beyond low-hanging fruit.

It’s alongside this watering hole — in a humble brick and plywood house — where Matthieu lives. When he first moved there in 2012, he could hear gunshots almost every night. The park had been left virtually unguarded for years, and the elephant population — at around 3,000 in 1970 — was down to a mere 42 animals.

His job, like Mark’s, is to reverse this trend. They work as undercover agents in an elite anti-poaching unit under the leadership of former South African Special Forces Commander Mike Labuschagne, a man with a long history of military experience in African conflict zones and a reputation for toughness. In the late 1980s, he fought Cuban forces alongside guerrilla factions in Angola. (“The Cold War wasn’t so cold here,” he says.) Afterward, he contracted for a number of private military operations that targeted illegal gold mines, before a friend suggested he try anti-poaching in 1992…

more…

https://melmagazine.com/going-undercover-with-africas-premier-anti-poaching-unit-ab9e5c309c0c

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WHAT THE FUCK ?

Bald Men in Mozambique Are Being Hunted Down for the Gold in Their Heads

by C. Brian Smith

Mozambique has issued a unique travel advisory to bald men: Pack a hat.

While this may seem like a joke, the police chief reasons it’s the simplest means of protection in a place where five bald men have been killed in the previous two months alone.

“Their motivations come from superstition and culture,” a police spokesman said at an early June press conference. “The local community thinks bald individuals are rich.”

Specifically, local witch doctors and healers believe the heads of bald men contain gold, and that by performing rituals with their body parts, they can bestow those riches upon their patients and clients.

“This is the first I’ve heard of going after bald men for money-magic or money-medicine in Africa, but it’s part of the broader phenomenon that characterizes forms of mystifying neoliberal economic developments in Africa beginning in the 1990s, and draws on traditional cultural models of witchcraft and sorcery,” explains Andrew Apter, director of the African Studies Center at UCLA, who says murdering bald men to harvest body parts is related to “the occult economy” in East Africa.

In the early 1990s, Apter says, the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank — the two of the biggest lenders to Africa — instituted reforms that set prices for goods and services by the open market rather than by African governments artificially. “This included the elimination of state projects, trade tariffs and public subsidies,” Apter explains, “which led to massive unemployment in rural areas.”

Ever since, Mozambique, which until 1990 had a fairly successful socialist model, has experienced massive economic changes that have favored the rich and hurt the poor. By 2000, 69 percent of Mozambicans lived below the poverty line, according to the U.N. And in 1998, former Prime Minister Pascoal Mocumbi told donors, “Poverty is an atrocious reality, particularly in the countryside where 80 percent of the population lives.”

“Those in the cities are believed to be profiting at the expense of the rural youth, whose condition has worsened,” Apter explains. “From the perspective of the rural peasantry, there’s been a new class of very wealthy entrepreneurs whose wealth is ‘mysterious’ because it doesn’t seem to be related to visible labor or hard work, as in currency speculation or trading in futures.”

The pervasive rural explanation then is that these people — mostly men, many of whom shave their heads to follow style trends, believing they look better bald — are wealthy because they engage in Satanic practices. In turn, witch doctors are advising rural peasants in pursuit of money-making magic that it can be found within the hairless domes of this nouveau riche professional class.

Says Apter, “The modern bald style of men in Africa is very different — it’s associated with a certain kind of urbanity and cosmopolitanism, drawing on global youth culture and style as well as that of accomplished professionals and bankers.”

The most recent killings of bald men occurred in Zambezia, the same province where albino people have traditionally been targeted in similar rituals. Their body parts are believed to contain minerals and bring good luck.

“As outrageous as it seems,” says Oscar Duke, a British doctor with albinism who traveled to East Africa earlier this year to film a documentary on the subject of ritual killings, “the belief that minerals from an albino’s body bring wealth has led the rural poor to kill or mutilate 170 people in recent years, many of whom are children.”

Like Festo, a 15-year-old boy featured in the documentary who was attacked at age 7 by a group of men storming into his house with machetes. They knocked out his teeth and cut off his fingers while his mother was cooking dinner. “They think they will get money from our body parts,” the fingerless boy explains to Duke in the film. That’s because witch doctors pay top dollar for body parts of “abnormal” humans since magic “medicine” made from them is sold at a premium.

Beyond albinos, Apter says such “abnormalities” include “virgins because they’re ‘pure’ and bald men because they’re ‘magically rich.’”

So for now, all three groups remain on high alert.

Or as one British tabloid breathlessly put it: “Superstars like Bruce Willis and Jason Statham warned to stay away from Africa — because baldies are being targeted by WITCH DOCTORS for use in magic potions

https://melmagazine.com/bald-men-in-mozambique-are-being-hunted-down-for-the-gold-in-their-heads-d10ebe4edd1d

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Over 70,000 White Citizens Of South Africa Have Been MURDERED BY BLACKS

 

Resultado de imagem para images of whites killed by blacks in south africa

image edited by Web Investigator

Over 70,000 White Citizens Of South Africa Have
Been MURDERED BY BLACKS – It Hasn’t Stopped

By Patricia Doyle
3-29-17

Hello Jeff – Let’s go back a couple years to 2015 South Africa.  Virtually no one knows because of the communist socialist US MSM that well over 70,000 whites of European heritage were butchered by sub-human blacks. Most were tortured before they passed on and were relieved of their horrific suffering.  This is the new millennium and then sub-aunimal black creatures are still living as they always have…breeding, sleeping, eating, raping and murdering.  That’s it and that’s the sad, factual truth.

  This number of 70,000 does not reflect the multitudes of whites who were killed and buried in unmarked mass graves. There are countless White South Africans who are buried alive never to be found again.

There have been scores of White South Africans who were raped by savage blacks who have HIV Aids and TB which gave their victims death sentences.  Many others were the victims of beatings and robbery, and had their homes and property stolen or burned to the ground.

Where is the outrage? Where is Trump with an EO immediately opening the doors to America for REAL refugees whose lives are REALLY at risk and who share our same cultural history?  He is nowhere…he can’t even say a few words about it.  Not even a simple tweet.  “Race war on whites in SA must STOP”.  Nothing.

 The world showed outrage at Apartheid in South Africa but not one word of outrage about the torture and genocide of people who are white.  They are massacred because of the color of their skin but no cries of racism come from Academia, Political institutions like the US Congress etc.  No one talks about the world’s most outrageous Apartheid government in the zionist state of Israel.  What does the US do?  We recently gave them nearly $35 BILLION of the next tens years.  America supports racism and Apartheid in Israel because we are an israeli vassal state.

So, where are the cries to save South African whites who built an entire civilization in that formerly virtually DESERTED portion of Africa hundreds of years ago.  (Look it up)  When the blacks came in numbers because life was good there, they were welcomed and integrated into society.  Yes, there was Apartheid but only because it was necessary…African blacks there hadn’t built even a 2-story building on their own, let alone possessed the skills to build skyscrapers and then to compete on the sophisticated world economic stage.  It was necessary to keep the nation prosperous and functional and that is why there was Apartheid.

Since the western communists and the communist blacks (the Mandelas et al) in South Africa overthrew Apartheid, the country has been in a steady dive of death, horror, and economic ruin administered by countless black incompetent idiots who are intent on destroying a wonderful first world nation and sending it to a dystopian rape and genocidal hell.

I must be getting deaf in my old age as I cannot hear the cries for asylum for these innocent white South African peoples.  I do hear the cries of the white children, the elderly, and the parents of people tortured and murdered for the color of their skin.

How is this not condemned by ANY American media and not called racism or hate crime?  This is yet another great shame on our once compassionate, wonderful nation.

So, now you know why White South Africa had to protect their families and lives with Apartheid.  Apartheid was a tool that kept White South African families from being massacred by the blacks.  It was indeed necessary.  Now, the whites ARE being massacred.  No apartheid…and now as of 2015 70,000 whites massacred.

Remember, that is the number of deaths we can count. I would venture to project with all the mass graves and the rapes of innocent whites by infected blacks the real death toll will be well over 250,000 white lives by 2017.  There are over 40 million negroes in South Africa and only 4 million whites.

This cannot and must not continue.  The US is able to bring in 50,000 muslim ‘refugees’ this year who agenda it is to kill us.  Why not bring in TRUE refugees and TRUE Asylum seekers, bring in the White South Africans before they are all extinct.

Time is running out.
White Lives Matter

Patty – See more at: http://www.rense.com/general96/70000whites.htm#sthash.nDamvAsx.dpuf

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Muslims Confiscate Wives Salaries – Where Are Feminists?

More Algerian women work, but husbands control wages

By AFP
Female police cadets perform during their graduation ceremony at the police academy in Ain Benian August 6, 2009. 
PHOTO: REUTERS

Female police cadets perform during their graduation ceremony at the police academy in Ain Benian August 6, 2009. PHOTO: REUTERS

ALGIERS: 

More and more Algerian women are challenging traditional norms by getting jobs, but many see their salaries confiscated by their husbands despite a law against the practice.

“It’s financial harassment,” lawyer Fatma-Zohra Benbraham said. “It’s a dangerous phenomenon that has been kept silent for a long time.”

Lawyers say that as more women go into the workplace, tensions over money are causing a surge in divorces.

lleviating poverty: 252 deserving women get buffaloes

Female employment rose from 10.2% in 2005 to 13.6 by 2015, with around 2 million Algerian women now in work, alongside just under nine million men. The number of divorces almost doubled from 34,000 in 2007 to around 60,000 in 2014.

Benbraham said financial disputes, particularly over control of wives’ salaries, are behind the rise. “The tendency to divorce has increased in recent years. Money is the main cause of marital breakdowns,” she added.

Women say they face financial blackmail. If a wife refuses to let her husband control her wages, she is forced to stay at home or even face divorce proceedings – a source of shame in the conservative country.

Women empowerment: Top aide says K-P to adopt bill on domestic violence

In other cases, fathers or brothers take control of their female relatives’ money. “Many women prefer to divorce so they can keep their salaries for themselves and their children,” said Benbraham.

In 2015, Algeria’s parliament adopted a law aimed at preventing husbands from taking control of their wives’ salaries.

It says “anyone who exercises constraints on their spouse in order to have access to their property or financial resources” can be imprisoned for up to two years.

But many women say the law does not protect them enough.

“I never see my money. My husband takes it all,” a woman identified only as Nadia told local daily El Watan. “The law should protect us.”

Nourredine Bekis, professor of sociology at the University of Algiers, said the practice was a result of patriarchal society.

“We have taught boys that financial power is the basis for establishing male domination,” he said.

‘Women should be given equal rights’ 

Algerian husbands are traditionally responsible for providing for their wives and children, while a wife’s money is reserved for her own use. But as they head to work, women have little choice but to hand their cash over to their husbands or risk their families falling apart.

The debate on the right of women to control their salaries was recently revived by Mounia Meslem, minister for the family and the status of women.

She provoked a wave of criticism on social media when she called on women to give their wages to the state to help it cope with financial difficulties arising from a fall in the price of oil, the country’s main resource.

“We can help our country,” she told the private television channel El Bilad. “It is not our income that gives us a livelihood, but rather our husbands who take care of us.”

Critics said her comment represented a step backwards for women’s rights.

https://tribune.com.pk/story/1365408/algerian-women-work-husbands-control-wages/

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What Really Turned the Sahara Desert From a Green Oasis Into a Wasteland?

FBBY1H (1).jpg

One of the world’s most iconic deserts was once lush and green. What happened? (Alamy )

10,000 years ago, this iconic desert was unrecognizable. A new hypothesis suggests that humans may have tipped the balance

SMITHSONIAN.COM

When most people imagine an archetypal desert landscape—with its relentless sun, rippling sand and hidden oases—they often picture the Sahara. But 11,000 years ago, what we know today as the world’s largest hot desert would’ve been unrecognizable. The now-dessicated northern strip of Africa was once green and alive, pocked with lakes, rivers, grasslands and even forests. So where did all that water go?

Archaeologist David Wright has an idea: Maybe humans and their goats tipped the balance, kick-starting this dramatic ecological transformation. In a new study in the journal Frontiers in Earth Science, Wright set out to argue that humans could be the answer to a question that has plagued archaeologists and paleoecologists for years.

The Sahara has long been subject to periodic bouts of humidity and aridity. These fluctuations are caused by slight wobbles in the tilt of the Earth’s orbital axis, which in turn changes the angle at which solar radiation penetrates the atmosphere. At repeated intervals throughout Earth’s history, there’s been more energy pouring in from the sun during the West African monsoon season, and during those times—known as African Humid Periods—much more rain comes down over north Africa.

With more rain, the region gets more greenery and rivers and lakes. All this has been known for decades. But between 8,000 and 4,500 years ago, something strange happened: The transition from humid to dry happened far more rapidly in some areas than could be explained by the orbital precession alone, resulting in the Sahara Desert as we know it today. “Scientists usually call it ‘poor pramaterization’ of the data,” Wright said by email. “Which is to say that we have no idea what we’re missing here—but something’s wrong.”

As Wright pored the archaeological and environmental data (mostly sediment cores and pollen records, all dated to the same time period), he noticed what seemed like a pattern. Wherever the archaeological record showed the presence of “pastoralists”—humans with their domesticated animals—there was a corresponding change in the types and variety of plants. It was as if, every time humans and their goats and cattle hopscotched across the grasslands, they had turned everything to scrub and desert in their wake.

Wright thinks this is exactly what happened. “By overgrazing the grasses, they were reducing the amount of atmospheric moisture—plants give off moisture, which produces clouds—and enhancing albedo,” Wright said. He suggests this may have triggered the end of the humid period more abruptly than can be explained by the orbital changes. These nomadic humans also may have used fire as a land management tool, which would have exacerbated the speed at which the desert took hold.

It’s important to note that the green Sahara always would’ve turned back into a desert even without humans doing anything—that’s just how Earth’s orbit works, says geologist Jessica Tierney, an associate professor of geoscience at the University of Arizona. Moreover, according to Tierney, we don’t necessarily need humans to explain the abruptness of the transition from green to desert.

Instead, the culprits might be regular old vegetation feedbacks and changes in the amount of dust. “At first you have this slow change in the Earth’s orbit,” Tierney explains. “As that’s happening, the West African monsoon is going to get a little bit weaker. Slowly you’ll degrade the landscape, switching from desert to vegetation. And then at some point you pass the tipping point where change accelerates.”

Tierney adds that it’s hard to know what triggered the cascade in the system, because everything is so closely intertwined. During the last humid period, the Sahara was filled with hunter-gatherers. As the orbit slowly changed and less rain fell, humans would have needed to domesticate animals, like cattle and goats, for sustenance. “It could be the climate was pushing people to herd cattle, or the overgrazing practices accelerated denudation [of foliage],” Tierney says.

Which came first? It’s hard to say with evidence we have now. “The question is: How do we test this hypothesis?” she says. “How do we isolate the climatically driven changes from the role of humans? It’s a bit of a chicken and an egg problem.” Wright, too, cautions that right now we have evidence only for correlation, not causation.

But Tierney is also intrigued by Wright’s research, and agrees with him that much more research needs to be done to answer these questions.

“We need to drill down into the dried-up lake beds that are scattered around the Sahara and look at the pollen and seed data and then match that to the archaeological datasets,” Wright said. “With enough correlations, we may be able to more definitively develop a theory of why the pace of climate change at the end of the AHP doesn’t match orbital timescales and is irregular across northern Africa.”

Tierney suggests researchers could use mathematical models that compare the impact hunter-gatherers would have on the environment versus that of pastoralists herding animals. For such models it would be necessary to have some idea of how many people lived in the Sahara at the time, but Tierney is sure there were more people in the region than there are today, excepting coastal urban areas…

more…

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/what-really-turned-sahara-desert-green-oasis-wasteland-180962668/#3aY85oLSfAGlomkP.99
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