Changed by art

Gazing at a painting feels like an almost magical encounter with another mind but what real effects does art have on us? Ellen Winner is professor of psychology at Boston College and senior research associate at Project Zero at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her most recent book is How Art Works: A Psychological Exploration (2018).  Edited by Nigel Warburton Scenario 1: suppose you’ve been gazing intensely at Rembrandt’s Self-Portrait (1659), which hangs in the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, and later you’re told that this was actually a painting made by a deep-learning machine that had internalised Rembrandt’s style through exposure to his … Continue reading Changed by art

Japanese Food Artist Uses Toast as Her Canvas for Edible Masterpieces

By Emma Taggart  Since it’s the most important meal of the day, many of us are pretty particular about how we like our breakfast. Toast is a staple for most, but for Japanese designer Manami Sasaki, slices of bread aren’t just tasty snacks—they’re her artistic canvas. She meticulously tops toast with colorful ingredients to create edible designs based on Japanese art and geometric patterns. These breakfasts aren’t the type of meal you can quickly prepare and eat as you run out the door. Sasaki spends hours cutting and positioning each ingredient on the toasted bread with perfect precision. For one eye-catching spring-inspired … Continue reading Japanese Food Artist Uses Toast as Her Canvas for Edible Masterpieces

Chloe Jafe Takes Big Risks as She Photographs the Japanese Mafia

“Idon’t really consider the people I photograph as ‘subjects’ because a lot of them become part of my life,” says Chloe Jafe. She adds, “it’s a moment of connection, an exchange, where vulnerability is on both sides. Photography is just what is left from the moment.” Jafe, who’s based in Japan, has fully immersed herself in the culture. For a photographer, living in Japan offers a range of interesting topics. In Jafe’s case, she found herself focusing her creative energy on the Yakuza, otherwise known as the Japanese mafia. It’s a series of photographs and encounters that have spanned over … Continue reading Chloe Jafe Takes Big Risks as She Photographs the Japanese Mafia

“There are 360 degrees. Why stick to one?”: The real legacy of architect Zaha Hadid

Iraqi-born Zaha Hadid—aka the Queen of the Curve—fundamentally altered the contours of modern architecture and design. BY LAKSHMI PRIYA RAJENDRAN In the five years since Zaha Hadid’s passing, much has been written about the glorious and towering legacy the fabled British-Iraqi architect left behind. Thinking about what she started, though, is more instructive. Born in Baghdad, Iraq in 1950, Hadid—aka the Queen of the Curve—fundamentally altered the contours of modern architecture and design. She shattered gender stereotypes too by, in 2004, becoming the first woman to receive the Pritzker Architecture Prize—the highest award in her field. As the world grapples with how to respond to the climate crisis, architecture … Continue reading “There are 360 degrees. Why stick to one?”: The real legacy of architect Zaha Hadid

Phantasia

Imagination is a powerful tool, a sixth sense, a weapon. We must be careful how we use it, in life as on stage or screen Paul Giamatti is a theatre, film and television actor living in New York City. Some of his notable performances feature in the HBO TV series John Adams (2008), the Showtime TV series Billions (2016-), and the films American Splendor (2003) and Sideways (2004). Stephen T Asma is professor of philosophy at Columbia College Chicago and a member of the Public Theologies of Technology and Presence programme at the Institute of Buddhist Studies in Berkeley, California. He is the author of many books, including The … Continue reading Phantasia

‘Revolutionary’ photo book of lesbians reissued for the first time since 1979

“Lesbian women were so invisible, even to one other, depending on where you lived,” said Lisa Vogel, 64, who appears in two photographs in the book. By Julius Constantine Motal Where there was absence, Joan E. Biren saw potential. As a lesbian and photographer in the early 1970s, Biren, who goes by JEB, said she was dismayed at the dearth of images that truly reflected her life and the lives of so many in the lesbian community. So, around 1970, she borrowed a camera from a friend and simply held it out at arm’s length as she and her lover at … Continue reading ‘Revolutionary’ photo book of lesbians reissued for the first time since 1979

I Am Not a Machine. Yes You Are.

Debating the impact of machine-created art. BY KEVIN BERGER I’m trying to explain to Arthur I. Miller why artworks generated by computers don’t quite do it for me. There’s no human being behind them. The works aren’t a portal into another person’s mind, where you can wander in a warren of intention, emotion, and perception, feeling life being shaped into form. What’s more, it often seems, people just ain’t no good, so it’s transcendent to be reminded they can be. Art is one of the few human creations that can do that. Machine art never can because it’s not, well, … Continue reading I Am Not a Machine. Yes You Are.

To the core

A devastating loss can shatter the façade we put up for others, exposing our deepest, rawest self. A work of art can do the same Julia F Christensen is a senior research fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics in Frankfurt, Germany, and author of Tanzen Ist Die Beste Medizin (2018), or ‘Dance is the Best Medicine’, forthcoming in English in 2022. Edited by Pam Weintraub ‘Don’t show off! Don’t pretend to be, be!’ The piercing voice of my stern ballet teacher with the stick and the square glasses still echoes in my mind. These two sentences were standard at almost every rehearsal when I was … Continue reading To the core

The Famed Painting The Scream Holds a Hidden Message

Open speculation about his mental health plagued the artist Edvard Munch. In his most famous work, he left a biting commentary By Jan Dönges  “Kan kun være malet af en gal Mand!” (“Can only have been painted by a madman!”) appears on Norwegian artist Edvard Munch’s most famous painting The Scream. Infrared images at Norway’s National Museum in Oslo recently confirmed that Munch himself wrote this note. The inscription has always been visible to the naked eye, but the infrared images helped to more clearly distinguish the writing from its background. Comparing it with the artist’s handwriting then clearly proved Munch’s authorship. “The finding … Continue reading The Famed Painting The Scream Holds a Hidden Message

Photographer Creates His Own 78-Card Tarot Deck Inspired by His Sleep Paralysis

Death By Sara Barnes  [Interview] This post may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase, My Modern Met may earn an affiliate commission. Please read our disclosure for more info. Like many people, photographer Nicolas Bruno is enthralled by tarot cards. Having interacted with the mysterious cards at a young age, the deck of divination continued to pique his interest into adulthood. Now, Bruno’s latest series, titled The Somnia Tarot, depicts the entire 78-card deck and considers the symbology behind the alluring images that are often used to predict the future. Bruno began his tarot card photography by referring to his portfolio of surreal imagery. His previous … Continue reading Photographer Creates His Own 78-Card Tarot Deck Inspired by His Sleep Paralysis