‘Knowing how’ is in your brain

by Carnegie Mellon University Although we often think of knowledge as “knowing that” (for example, knowing that Paris is the capital of France), each of us also knows many procedures consisting of knowing how, such as knowing how to tie a knot or start a car. Now a new study has found the brain programs that code the sequence of steps in performing a complex procedure. In a just published paper in Psychological Science, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have found a way to find decode the procedural information required to tie various knots, with enough precision to identify which knot is … Continue reading ‘Knowing how’ is in your brain

Why Science Denialism Persists

Two new books explore what motivates people to reject science — and why it’s so hard to shake deep-seated beliefs. BY ELIZABETH SVOBODA TO HEAR SOME EXPERTS tell it, science denial is mostly a contemporary phenomenon, with climate change deniers and vaccine skeptics at the vanguard. Yet the story of Galileo Galilei reveals just how far back denial’s lineage stretches. Years of astronomical sightings and calculations had convinced Galileo that the Earth, rather than sitting at the center of things, revolved around a larger body, the sun. But when he laid out his findings in widely shared texts, as astrophysicist Mario Livio writes in “Galileo … Continue reading Why Science Denialism Persists

Is Everyone Depressed?

Suddenly, many people meet the criteria for clinical depression. Doctors are scrambling to determine who needs urgent intervention, and who is simply the new normal. by JAMES HAMBLIN The word I keep hearing is numbness. Not necessarily a sickness, but feeling ill at ease. A sort of detachment or removal from reality. Deb Hawkins, a tech analyst in Michigan, describes the feeling of being stuck at home during the coronavirus pandemic as “sleep-walking through my life” or “wading through a physical and mental quicksand.” Even though she has been living in what she calls an “introvert heaven” for the past two … Continue reading Is Everyone Depressed?

Athletes During the Pandemic Are Learning What Fans Have Always Known

As players return to empty arenas, they are discovering a basic truth: Live sports is an act of social imagination. by DANNY CHAU This past weekend, the most resonant sound in the world of sports, heard by hundreds of millions of people, was a rattle: the soft, metallic clinking of a soccer ball ricocheting off the back of a goal net at Westfalenstadion in Dortmund, Germany. It was the first live goal the Bundesliga, the highest level of soccer competition in Germany, had seen in more than two months, gently shepherded in by the 19-year-old Borussia Dortmund star Erling Haaland in … Continue reading Athletes During the Pandemic Are Learning What Fans Have Always Known

Music helps us remember who we are and how we belong during difficult and traumatic times

A researcher talks about the power of music in a crisis. by Emily Abrams Ansari  Has the music we listen to, and why we listen, changed during the coronavirus pandemic? Beyond the well-documented evidence of pandemic music-making at a distance and over social media, music critics have suggested there is an increased preference for music that is comforting, familiar and nostalgic. Data from major streaming services and companies that analyze them may support this view. On Spotify, the popularity of chart hits dropped 28 per cent between March 12 and April 16. Instead, Spotify listeners are searching for instrumental and “chill” music. In the first … Continue reading Music helps us remember who we are and how we belong during difficult and traumatic times

CAN YOU STILL TAKE A PUNCH TO THE FACE AT 60 LIKE YOU COULD AT 25?

by Mike Rampton  With Mike Tyson headed back into the ring, let’s see just how good an idea it is for a man of advancing years to take a wallop Mike Tyson, not a young man, says he’s going to fight again. Iron Mike has been offered $20 million by the Bare Knuckle Fighting Championship to get in the ring, and he’s been posting videos of himself in the gym, claiming both that he’s back and that people should purchase Bad Boys for Life on DVD or Blu-Ray. Tyson is currently 53. He’ll be 54 in July, with a grey beard framing the world’s most … Continue reading CAN YOU STILL TAKE A PUNCH TO THE FACE AT 60 LIKE YOU COULD AT 25?

The Best and Worst Case Scenarios for the Future of Nightlife

We asked some experts for their thoughts on a potential utopia, and potential dystopia. By Sirin Kale; photos by Sian Bradley This article originally appeared on VICE UK. Even when the coronavirus lockdown eases, it’s likely that nightclubs and festivals will be among the last businesses to recover: who can imagine packing onto a crowded, sweaty dance floor before a vaccine is operational? To make matters worse, in South Korea – where the virus was dealt with so successfully that they only had a handful of cases left in the second week of May – a new outbreak has been linked to young people going to nightclubs in Seoul. But what’s … Continue reading The Best and Worst Case Scenarios for the Future of Nightlife