Fear of Humans Is Making Animals Around the World Go Nocturnal

Red fox scavenging in London at nightJAMIE HALL Even non-threatening activities like hiking are changing creatures’ sleep cycles. by MICHELLE NIJHUIS In 2011, the wildlife biologist Justin Brashares and his students set up a series of camera traps in and around Ruaha National Park in southern Tanzania. They were studying the effects of human activities on antelope reproduction, but their cameras soon revealed an odd and far more obvious pattern. While the antelope inside the park were active during the day, those outside the park, closer to human settlements, were active primarily at night—even though lions, which prey on antelope … Continue reading Fear of Humans Is Making Animals Around the World Go Nocturnal

Stunning Time-Lapse Footage of Hawaii’s Kīlauea Eruption

image edited by Fernando Kaskais Video by Tyler Hulett A volcanic eruption is often not the explosive, flash-flood-of-lava affair that persists in the popular imagination, largely thanks to the notorious event at Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD. Rather, volcanic eruptions can be disasters in slow motion. This is currently the case in Hawaii, where Kīlauea, a shield volcano, is releasing a ponderous lava flow that is wreaking havoc on local communities and causing mass evacuations. But Kīlauea’s prominence in the recent news cycle is deceiving; in reality, the volcano has been insidiously erupting for 35 years. Kīlauea’s slow-motion flow makes it the perfect … Continue reading Stunning Time-Lapse Footage of Hawaii’s Kīlauea Eruption

How Do Aliens Solve Climate Change?

NASA / Ames / JPL-Caltech by ADAM FRANK Scientists recently modeled a range of interactions between energy-intensive civilizations and their planets. The results were sobering. The universe does many things. It makes galaxies, comets, black holes, neutron stars, and a whole mess more. We’ve lately discovered that it makes a great deal of planets, but it’s not clear whether it regularly makes energy-hungry civilizations, nor is it clear whether such civilizations inevitably drive their planets into climate change. There’s lots of hope riding on our talk about building a sustainable civilization on Earth. But how do we know that’s even … Continue reading How Do Aliens Solve Climate Change?

What is being done to limit the 8 million metric tons of plastic that escapes into the world’s oceans each year?

 by: Edsel Cook (Natural News) Each year, eight million metric tons of plastic finds its way into the oceans of the world – with much of it coming from Southeast Asia. To prevent further damage, environmentalists, the plastics industry, and national governments have all taken steps to reduce plastic pollution and improve waste management, according to an article on Chemical & Engineering News. In addition, plastics companies and non-government organizations have teamed up to find new ways of collecting, sorting, and recycling plastic garbage, following a paper by researcher Jenna Jambeck from the University of Georgia in 2015. In her paper, Jambeck warned that annual plastics leakage could … Continue reading What is being done to limit the 8 million metric tons of plastic that escapes into the world’s oceans each year?

‘Climate-Change Deniers Are a Cult’

image edited by Fernando Kaskais Video by The Atlantic Author: Caitlin Cadieux “I’m not a fan of fiction that’s totally hopeless,” says Jeff VanderMeer, author of Annihilation, in an interview with The Atlantic, animated in the video above. “You find ways of documenting the world as it is, [with its] beauty, and you wind up redefining utopia and dystopia.” VanderMeer goes on to explain how, in writing fiction about climate change and environmental crises, he hopes to “push us out of our complacency.” image edited by Fernando Kaskais “We can’t live the way we live now,” he says, “but there are ways in which … Continue reading ‘Climate-Change Deniers Are a Cult’

A metropolitan world

Hans Baluschek’s Großstadtlichter (1931), oil on canvas. Stadtmuseum, Berlin. Photo of painting courtesy of Michael Setzpfandt Urbanisation may be the most profound change to human society in a century, more telling than colour, class or continent by Michael Goebel is professor of global and Latin American history at the Freie Universität Berlin. He is the author of Anti-Imperial Metropolis: Interwar Paris and the Seeds of Third World Nationalism (2015). Edited by Sam Haselby At some unknown moment between 2010 and 2015, for the first time in human history, more than half the world’s population lived in cities. Urbanisation is unlikely to reverse. Every week since, another 3 … Continue reading A metropolitan world

City life is KILLING humanity: 95% of humans living today are breathing polluted air, mostly from cities

 by: Isabelle Z. (Natural News) Even if you don’t have any unhealthy habits, something that you do every day could be killing you: breathing. A new report from the Health Effects Instituteshows that more than 95 percent of the people on our planet are breathing in air that is unsafe. Unfortunately, it’s those who live in the poorest communities that are being hit the hardest. While cities are packed with people and can expose millions of individuals at once to unsafe air, the risk of indoor air pollution in rural areas should not be underestimated. Around 2.6 billion people were exposed to air pollution … Continue reading City life is KILLING humanity: 95% of humans living today are breathing polluted air, mostly from cities