A Record 7 Named Storms Are Swirling Across The Globe – Has ‘The Day After Tomorrow’ Arrived?

Authored by Michael Snyder via The Economic Collapse blog, Is something extremely unusual happening to our planet?  At this moment, Hurricane Florence is just one of seven named storms that are currently circling the globe.  That matches the all-time record, and it looks like that record will be broken very shortly as a couple more storms continue to develop.  Back in 2004, a Hollywood blockbuster entitled “The Day After Tomorrow” depicted a world in which weather patterns had gone mad.  One of the most impressive scenes showed nearly the entire planet covered by hurricane-type storms all at once.  Of course things are not nearly … Continue reading A Record 7 Named Storms Are Swirling Across The Globe – Has ‘The Day After Tomorrow’ Arrived?

Fukushima in America? Twelve nuclear power plants are in the path of Hurricane Florence… flooding, storm surge threaten cooling operations

Tuesday, September 11, 2018 by: Mike Adams (Natural News) At least twelve operating nuclear reactors are in the predicted path of Hurricane Florence, which has been upgraded to a category 4 storm as it surges toward the U.S. East Coast. According to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which offers an interactive map of active nuclear reactors, two plants are vulnerable to both heavy rainfall and the expected storm surge which could bring a surge of up to 20 feet of ocean water pouring into coastal areas. Those two reactors, located NE of Myrtle Beach, North Carolina, are known as “Brunswick Steam Electric … Continue reading Fukushima in America? Twelve nuclear power plants are in the path of Hurricane Florence… flooding, storm surge threaten cooling operations

Alive and ticking

From Voyage to the South Pole and Oceania on the Corvettes Astrolabe and Zélée, during the years 1837-1840 by Jules Sébastien Cesar Dumont d’Urville. Photo by Getty Images The idea that nature is a humming, complex, clockwork machine has been around for centuries. Is it due for a revival? Jessica Riskin is professor of history of science at Stanford University. Her latest book is The Restless Clock: A History of the Centuries-Long Argument Over What Makes Living Things Tick(2016). Published in association with The University of Chicago Press Edited by Sally Davies The philosopher René Descartes, who lived for a time near the royal gardens of … Continue reading Alive and ticking

Watch Hurricane Lane Be Destroyed By HAARP-Like EMF Just Before It Was To Hit US Military Bases On Oahu – Photos

By Jeff Rense 8-26-18 Like most of us, I have watched hurricanes via aerial and satellite photos all my life. Huge, masses of moisture, wind and POWER spiraling counterclockwise (reverse in the Southern Hemisphere) and often doing enormous damage when these monsters make landfall. How big was Hurricane Lane? How large was the danger posed to the US Military on and around Oahu? It was SO large, there was a highest level US Navy alert and warning issued a couple days before Hurricane Lane was due to slam into Oahu… potentially causing hundreds of millions in damage to military installations … Continue reading Watch Hurricane Lane Be Destroyed By HAARP-Like EMF Just Before It Was To Hit US Military Bases On Oahu – Photos

It’s Time to Kill the Modern Automobile

If we’re serious about combatting global warming, we have to overhaul the gas-powered automobile and the culture that surrounds it. BY Emily Atkin GERMANY was supposed to be a model for solving global warming. In 2007, the country’s government announced that it would reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 40 percent by the year 2020. This was the kind of bold, aggressive climate goal scientists said was needed in all developed countries. If Germany could do it, it would prove the target possible. “If U.S. roads were a war zone, they would be the most dangerous battlefield the American military has ever encountered.” So far, … Continue reading It’s Time to Kill the Modern Automobile

Predators, Prey, and Vodka

Surveying muskoxen in the Russian far north. BY JOEL BERGER Wrangel Island carries a certain profoundness, a divine story of a different sort. Life here is postapocalyptic, a kind of rebound. It portends the future. My sponsor is Alexander Gruzdev, a big bear of a man with a nice smile, a throaty Russian accent, a Ph.D. in biology, and the ability to knock back a lot of vodka. Alexander is also the director of the Wrangel Island Reserve. He goes by Sasha, and is not the best communicator. On the occasions when Sasha tries to speak English—which I appreciate—much of … Continue reading Predators, Prey, and Vodka

The Obliteration of Night: On the Consequences of Electric Light

BY Richard G ‘Bugs’ Stevens  LIGHT POLLUTION is often characterized as a soft issue in environmentalism. This perception needs to change. Light at night constitutes a massive assault on the ecology of the planet, including us. It also has indirect impacts because, while 20 percent of electricity is used for lighting worldwide, at least 30 percentof that light is wasted. Wasted light serves no purpose at all, and excessive lighting is too often used beyond what is needed for driving, or shopping, or Friday-night football. . It might be that virtually all aspects of health and wellbeing are dependent to one extent or another on a synchronized … Continue reading The Obliteration of Night: On the Consequences of Electric Light