Why The World Is Starting To Panic Over Climate – Analysis

By Robin Russell-Jones Scientific background Climate change is the biggest threat that humanity has ever faced. Warming of the troposphere as a result of releasing man-made greenhouse gases into the atmosphere was predicted as long ago as 1896. Levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere have been measured continuously since 1958 at the Mauna Lao Observatory in Hawaii. CO2 has risen from a pre-industrial level of 280 parts per million (ppm) to 415 ppm (2021). Methane is the second most important greenhouse gas and has risen from a pre-industrial level of 722 parts per billion to 1,866 (2019). Methane levels … Continue reading Why The World Is Starting To Panic Over Climate – Analysis

Earth Temperature Could Reach ‘Tipping Point’ Within Five Years, Study Warns

A study by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) suggests Earth’s temperature could reach its ‘tipping point’ within the next five years.  BY : EMILY BROWN  Last year marked one of the three warmest years on record, with the global average temperature being 1.2°C above pre-industrial levels, but the WMO has warned the worst could be yet to come as the chances of the temperature reaching 1.5°C are increasing with time. The UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has established 1.5°C as a key tipping point for the Earth’s temperature, beyond which the risks of disasters such as extreme drought, fires, floods and … Continue reading Earth Temperature Could Reach ‘Tipping Point’ Within Five Years, Study Warns

Climate change could fuel the spread of a flesh-eating parasite

IDLIB, SYRIA – JULY 02: A Syrian kid suffering from leishmaniasis, a parasitic disease spread by the bite of phlebotomine sandflies, is seen in a refugee camp in Idlib, Syria on July 02, 2020. In the refugee camps in Idlib, danger of leishmaniasis disease arose due to inadequate living conditions and insufficient health services. In the camps where sheltered civilians escaping from the attacks of Assad regime and its supporters, infrastructure problems, especially exposed septic pits and damaged sewers, cause the spread of the disease. (Muhammed Abdullah/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images) Scientists caution that as the planet warms, more Americans could … Continue reading Climate change could fuel the spread of a flesh-eating parasite

The Real Reason They Blame Heat Deaths, Blackouts, And Forest Fires On Climate Change Is Because They’re Causing Them – OpEd

by Michael Shellenberger  Journalists, experts, and elected officials are today blaming heat wave deaths, forest fires, and electricity shortages in New York, California, and Texas on climate change, but the underlying cause of those events is lack of air conditioning, lack of electricity, and the failure to properly manage forests, not marginal changes to temperatures. It’s true that there have been more heat waves in the United States since 1960, and that higher temperatures dry out the dead wood in forests, contributing to a greater area burned by forest fires. “Climate dries the [wood] fuels out and extends the fire season from … Continue reading The Real Reason They Blame Heat Deaths, Blackouts, And Forest Fires On Climate Change Is Because They’re Causing Them – OpEd

Blue bubbles helped “make the cause of climate change visible” say visualisers behind viral video

by Jennifer Hahn  A 2012 animation showing New York City being buried under a mountain of giant bubbles allowed people to appreciate the scale of carbon emissions for the first time, according to its creators Real World Visuals. Released in 2012, the computer-generated timelapse shows the city being buried under a mountain of bubbles representing the city’s 54 million tonnes of annual CO2 emissions. “Carbon emissions are invisible and that’s a core part of the problem,” said Real World Visuals co-founder Antony Turner. “If carbon dioxide was purple, we would start taking notice.” Making abstract concept of emissions more understandable In the video, the communications agency depicted the … Continue reading Blue bubbles helped “make the cause of climate change visible” say visualisers behind viral video

Acceleration Of Coastal Overtopping Around The World

Diagram explaining the phenomenon of marine submersion© Rafaël Almar & al., Nature Communications By Eurasia Review The combination of sea level rise, tides, storm surge and waves has increased the overtopping of natural and artificial coastal protection by nearly 50% in the last two decades. This revelation comes from an international study coordinated by IRD, involving international partners. The study was published in the prestigious scientific journal Nature Communications. By combining satellite data and digital models, the researchers have shown that coastal overtopping, and consequently the risk of flooding, is set to further accelerate over the 21st century, by up to 50-fold under … Continue reading Acceleration Of Coastal Overtopping Around The World

The ‘Wood Wide Web’ of Plant Communication

In “Finding the Mother Tree,” forest ecologist Suzanne Simard illuminates the complicated and intimate world of trees. BY SARAH BOON IMAGINE BEING A world-class scientist whose work was immortalized in James Cameron’s movie “Avatar,” and who inspired a character in Richard Powers’ Pulitzer-winning novel “The Overstory.” Others have written about her research, including Peter Wohlleben in “The Hidden Life of Trees.” Now, we finally hear from the scientist herself, Suzanne Simard, in “Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest.” Her book comes at a time when governments in Western Canada in particular are being confronted over their continued approval of old-growth forest logging. It … Continue reading The ‘Wood Wide Web’ of Plant Communication

See the horrifying place where your old clothes go to die

A landfill in Ghana is the final resting place for many of our fast fashion purchases. When author Maxine Bedat visited, it was literally on fire. BY MAXINE BEDAT One August day I found myself on top of one of the most impressive mountains I’ve seen. I’d scaled it with very little equipment, in the same Nike sneakers I wear on the treadmill. There were no harnesses, no guides, and no resupply stations along the way. In fact, it only took about 20 minutes to get to the summit, despite frequent picture breaks. At the top, I looked out into … Continue reading See the horrifying place where your old clothes go to die

Thoreau on Nature and Human Nature, the Tonic of Wildness, and the Value of the Unexplored

“At the same time that we are earnest to explore and learn all things, we require that all things be mysterious and unexplorable.” BY MARIA POPOVA “We call it ‘Nature’; only reluctantly admitting ourselves to be ‘Nature’ too,” Denise Levertov wrote in her revelation of a poem “Sojourns in the Parallel World” a generation after history’s most poetic piece of legislature termed that parallel world “wilderness” and defined it as “an area where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man, where man* himself is a visitor who does not remain.” Those of us who visit wild places the way others visit … Continue reading Thoreau on Nature and Human Nature, the Tonic of Wildness, and the Value of the Unexplored

The clothing revolution

What if the need for fabric, not food, in the face of a changing climate is what first tipped humanity towards agriculture? by Ian Gilligan is a prehistorian at the University of Sydney. He is the author of Climate, Clothing, and Agriculture in Prehistory: Linking Evidence, Causes, and Effects (2019). Edited by Sam Dresser Archaeologists and other scientists are beginning to unravel the story of our most intimate technology: clothing. They’re learning when and why our ancestors first started to wear clothes, and how their adoption was crucial to the evolutionary success of our ancestors when they faced climate change on a massive … Continue reading The clothing revolution