QUANTUM SELF: THE PSYCHOLOGY OF THE MANY WORLDS THEORY

Gary Z McGee, Contributor Waking Times “Understand how great is the darkness in which we grope, and never forget the natural-science assumptions with which we started are provisional and revisable things” ~William James Imagine you are the universe, and the universe is you. Feel it: the raw stardust in your bones, the ancient heat in your blood, the infinite interconnectedness of all things in your gut. Allow the fresh intensity of the moment to transcend all moments from quantum singularity to singular perception. Looking back, the story of you is thermodynamically layered through the push-and-pull of entropy. You’ve ascended an infinite … Continue reading QUANTUM SELF: THE PSYCHOLOGY OF THE MANY WORLDS THEORY

THE MYSTERY WALK: SEEKING A METAPARADIGM FOR THE EVOLVING TRUTH QUEST

Gary Z McGee, Contributor Waking Times  “I have no ideology. My life is my message.” ~Gandhi We are born into a story not of our making. The story of the unfolding universe begets the story of the earth begets the story of evolution begets the story of our species which begets the story of the culture we were born into. The mystery walk is our proactive contribution to the overall story of the unfolding mystery. It’s a spiritual journey into our own personal story. A story that includes what has been told already, what we decide to write into it, and how … Continue reading THE MYSTERY WALK: SEEKING A METAPARADIGM FOR THE EVOLVING TRUTH QUEST

Are we born evil? St. Augustine and “original sin”

Augustine’s theology came to define Christianity, but there was a rival theology. by JONNY THOMSON St. Augustine is considered one of the main “Church Fathers,” but his life was surprisingly salacious before his turn to Christianity. He was one of the major proponents of “original sin” — the idea that we are born with a natural inclination toward sin and evil. Augustine also was largely responsible for the “Neoplatonism” that infused so much early Christian theology, namely, the notion that the further something is from God (as perfection) the lesser it becomes. A lot of secular and religious morality hinges … Continue reading Are we born evil? St. Augustine and “original sin”

If you knew the future, would you still choose your life?

If you had perfect foreknowledge of the blessings and tragedies that will come in your life, would you make the same choices anyway? by JONNY THOMSON When we decide to act, we either are incredibly bad at thinking through the implications or give very little thought to the future at all. A short story by Ted Chiang, “The Story of Your Life,” asks us to imagine how things would be if we knew what would happen from our choices, especially tragic events. Would we still do them? Immanuel Kant argued that hope is essential to motivating our action. Without the hope that … Continue reading If you knew the future, would you still choose your life?

Consciousness and the Nature of the Universe: How Panpsychism and Its Fault Lines Shade in the Ongoing Mystery of What We Are

“We’ve barely begun to understand our place in the cosmos. As we continue to look out from our planet and contemplate the nature of reality, we should remember that there is a mystery right here where we stand.” BY MARIA POPOVA “Meditate often on the interconnectedness and mutual interdependence of all things in the universe,” the aging Marcus Aurelius instructed. “Any live mind today is of the very same stuff as Plato’s & Euripides,” the young Virginia Woolf meditated in her diary two millennia later. “It is this common mind that binds the whole world together; & all the world is mind.” Two … Continue reading Consciousness and the Nature of the Universe: How Panpsychism and Its Fault Lines Shade in the Ongoing Mystery of What We Are

Inside Nikola Tesla’s 3, 6, 9 Obsession And The Unusual Theories It Spawned

Wikimedia Commons Nikola Tesla’s 3 6 9 theory is alleged to “hold the key to the universe.” By Kaleena Fraga | Checked By Erik Hawkins Nikola Tesla’s fascination with the “magnificence” of the numbers 3, 6, and 9 continues to inspire those who believe the numbers will help them “manifest” their desires. When you’re a genius, you tend to notice things that others don’t. Nikola Tesla did. He envisioned the potential of electricity far before his contemporaries. So, is it possible that Nikola Tesla’s 3 6 9 theory of the universe holds water? Or is it merely evidence of Tesla’s obsessive nature? Tesla’s … Continue reading Inside Nikola Tesla’s 3, 6, 9 Obsession And The Unusual Theories It Spawned

RESEARCHERS: BUDDHIST MONKS’ BODIES DECAY VERY SLOWLY AT DEATH

According to traditional meditation lore, they are in a meditative state (thukdam) until their consciousness is clear; only then does the body begins to decay by NEWS We are told that one of the more remarkable effects of a lifetime of meditation can be a comparatively slow decay process for the body. Recent evidence for that emerged in the death of Tibetan Buddhist monk Geshe Lhundub Sopa,  Sopa, who had been tutor to the Dalai Lama in Tibet, moved to Wisconsin in 1967. There he co-founded the Deer Park Buddhist Center and taught South Asian Studies at the University of Wisconsin, … Continue reading RESEARCHERS: BUDDHIST MONKS’ BODIES DECAY VERY SLOWLY AT DEATH

Why Do We Have to Die?

The question of mortality can be answered by these calculations. BY AARON HIRSH Epidemics have a way of making one wonder about death. To put it plainly, in the raw form it takes as it first rises from our hearts: Why? Why on Earth does it have to be this way? In The Plague, Albert Camus’ novel of harrowing disease in an Algerian city, Father Paneloux, a faithful Jesuit, steps to the pulpit and offers his explanation. “This same pestilence which is slaying you,” Paneloux says, “works for your good and points your path.” In another sermon, Paneloux goes further: “The suffering of children … Continue reading Why Do We Have to Die?

Richard Dawkins on the Luckiness of Death

“The potential people who could have been here in my place but who will in fact never see the light of day outnumber the sand grains of Arabia.” BY MARIA POPOVA We are born into the certitude of our eventual death. Every once in a while, something — perhaps an encounter with a robin’s egg, perhaps a poem — staggers us with the awful, awe-filled wonder of aliveness, the sheer luck of it against the overwhelming cosmic odds of nonexistence. But alloyed with the awe is always the half-conscious grief that one day the light of consciousness will be extinguished. It is a … Continue reading Richard Dawkins on the Luckiness of Death

The Karma of Now

Why the present moment isn’t the goal By Thanissaro Bhikkhu Have you ever wondered why Buddhist meditation focuses so much attention on observing the mind in the present moment? It’s because of the way the Buddha taught karma (Pali, kamma), or action.  His teachings on karma were so central to all of his teachings that when he classified himself as a teacher, he used the label kamma-vadin: someone who teaches action. This was to distinguish himself from the many contemporary teachers in India who taught that action was unreal or had no consequences. But he also found it necessary to distinguish himself from other kamma-vadins, and he emphasized … Continue reading The Karma of Now