Exercise Wins: Fit Seniors Can Have Hearts That Look 30 Years Younger

David Trood/Getty Images  by PATTI NEIGHMOND The people who got caught up in the exercise boom of the 1970s and stuck with it into their senior years now have significantly healthier hearts and muscles than their sedentary counterparts. We know we need to exercise for our health, but a lifelong exercise habit may also help us feel younger and stay stronger well into our senior years. In fact, people in their 70s who have been exercising regularly for decades seem to have put a brake on the aging process, maintaining the heart, lung and muscle fitness of healthy people at … Continue reading Exercise Wins: Fit Seniors Can Have Hearts That Look 30 Years Younger

Turns out that claiming to be a transgender doesn’t excuse you from murdering your own parents

by: Ethan Huff (Natural News) A mentally-ill, gender-dysphoric person from Maine who back on Halloween of 2016 decided to murder both of “her” parents in cold blood is now trying to justify this gruesome act by claiming that “her” mom and dad just weren’t “tolerant” enough of “her” transgenderism. “Andrea” Balcer, born as Andrew Balcer, reportedly plunged “a hunting knife into his mother’s back as she comforted him in his bedroom,” according to CentralMaine.com. Hearing his wife’s screams, Balcer’s father rushed into the room, which is when Balcer then stabbed him to death, along with the family Chihuahua “because it would not stop barking.” Balcer … Continue reading Turns out that claiming to be a transgender doesn’t excuse you from murdering your own parents

Bee-brained

Honeybees (Apis mellifera) in the hive, Würzburg, Germany. Photo by Mark Moffatt/Minden/National Geographic Are insects ‘philosophical zombies’ with no inner life? Close attention to their behaviours and moods suggests otherwise Lars Chittka is professor of sensory and behavioural ecology at Queen Mary, University of London, and has been a fellow at the Institute of Advanced Study (WIKO) in Berlin. His book The Mind of the Bee (2019) is forthcoming with Princeton University Press. Catherine Wilson was most recently Anniversary Professor of philosophy at the University of York and is now Visiting Presidential Professor at CUNY Graduate Center. She was a fellow of the Institute of … Continue reading Bee-brained

When you’re Triggered and Regress Emotionally

By Sharie Stines, Psy.D Have you ever been in a situation where you felt much younger than your actual biological age, and not in a good way?  Perhaps when you encounter certain people, like your parents, you start feeling and acting like you did as a child; this is an example of emotional regression. Usually, when we are in close, interpersonal relationships with certain people, we find ourselves most vulnerable to emotionally regressing. The purpose of this article is to educate you on what emotional regression is in yourself, and teach you how to help yourself find your composure and your … Continue reading When you’re Triggered and Regress Emotionally

Buddhism According to Pessimism

Photo by Vincent Brown | https://tricy.cl/2E0OLTA Prominent pessimists see a kindred spirit in the Buddha’s honesty about suffering, but they ignore his remedy. By Matthew Gindin Pessimism has been making a comeback lately, and it’s not hard to see why. Myriad frightening ecological and political crises are unfolding throughout the world, all caused by greed, hatred, and delusion—Buddhism’s three principal toxins. To some, however, what’s unfolding is not an aberration. It’s a revelation that shows us the truly hopeless nature not just of people but of reality itself. Thomas Ligotti, dire pop-philosopher and acclaimed author in the “cosmic horror” genre, is … Continue reading Buddhism According to Pessimism

Researchers say they’ve identified two brain networks – one responsible for volition, the other for agency – that together underlie our sense of free will

By Emma Young While there’s still a debate about whether we have free will or not, most researchers at least agree that we feel as if we do. That perception is often considered to have two elements: a sense of having decided to act – called “volition”; and feeling that that decision was our own – having “agency”. Now in a paper in PNAS, Ryan Darby at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and colleagues have used a new technique – lesion network mapping – to identify for the first time the brain networks that underlie our feelings of volition and for agency. “Together, these networks may underlie our perception … Continue reading Researchers say they’ve identified two brain networks – one responsible for volition, the other for agency – that together underlie our sense of free will

The Planet Has Seen Sudden Warming Before. It Wiped Out Almost Everything.

Fossilized crinoids, marine invertebrates that lived during the Permian Period, found in western Australia. Scientists say the Great Dying, which wiped out 96 percent of all life in the oceans, was caused by global warming, which deprived the oceans of oxygen.CreditCreditJohn Cancalosi, via Getty Images In some ways, the planet’s worst mass extinction — 250 million years ago, at the end of the Permian Period — may parallel climate change today. By Carl Zimmer Some 252 million years ago, Earth almost died. In the oceans, 96 percent of all species became extinct. It’s harder to determine how many terrestrial species vanished, … Continue reading The Planet Has Seen Sudden Warming Before. It Wiped Out Almost Everything.