Reading John Gray in war

As a soldier, I was hard-wired to seek meaning and purpose. Gray’s philosophy helped me unhook from utopia and find peace Andy Owen is the author of All Soldiers Run Away: Alano’s War: The Story of a British Deserter (2017). He is a former soldier who writes on the ethics and philosophy of war. He lives in London. Edited by Nigel Warburton ‘All of humanity’s problems stem from man’s inability to sit quietly in a room alone.’Blaise Pascal (1623-62) Ifirst read the English philosopher John Gray while sitting in the silence of the still, mid-afternoon heat of Helmand Province in Afghanistan. In Black Mass: … Continue reading Reading John Gray in war

How a Nuclear Submarine Officer Learned to Live in Tight Quarters

You get comfortable being uncomfortable. BY STEVE WEINER I’m no stranger to forced isolation. For the better part of my 20s, I served as a nuclear submarine officer running secret missions for the United States Navy. I deployed across the vast Pacific Ocean with a hundred other sailors on the USS Connecticut, a Seawolf-class ship engineered in the bygone Cold War era to be one of the fastest, quietest, and deepest-diving submersibles ever constructed. The advanced reactor was loaded with decades of enriched uranium fuel that made steam for propulsion and electrical power so we could disappear under the waves … Continue reading How a Nuclear Submarine Officer Learned to Live in Tight Quarters

MILITARY BASES ON THE MOON – U.S. PLANS TO WEAPONIZE THE EARTH’S SATELLITE

by T.J. Coles, Counterpunch Waking Times In July, Dmitry Rogozin, Director General of Roscosmos, cited the U.S. “retreat from principles of cooperation and mutual support” to justify Russia’s refusal to join the latest U.S. space initiative: to build lunar bases. Rogozin was likely referring to the U.S. refusal to renew the Intermediate-range Forces Treaty and its intention to back out of the Open Skies Treaty. Russia responded by declaring that Venus is a “Russian planet.” The U.S. continues to reject Sino-Russian efforts to strengthen the Outer Space Treaty 1967, to prohibit the weaponization of space. Doing so would interfere with U.S. plans for “full spectrum dominance.” MOON LANDING 2.0 Last … Continue reading MILITARY BASES ON THE MOON – U.S. PLANS TO WEAPONIZE THE EARTH’S SATELLITE

Hirohito, the war criminal who got away

Seventy-five years on, Japan still can’t come to terms with its past by Francis Pike This month the global media marked the 75th anniversary of the dropping of atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The cities’ destructions were momentous indeed, but the coverage has squeezed out other memories of the Pacific War. Who remembers Japan’s genocidal campaign in China that killed more than 20 million people — thousands of them by poison gas and canisters containing plague and typhus? Or the murder of 35 percent of the 200,000 soldiers and civilians held in Japanese prisoner-of-war camps that meted out unspeakable … Continue reading Hirohito, the war criminal who got away

3 OTHER MASSIVE EXPLOSIONS THAT LEFT US WONDERING WHEN TACTICAL NUKES WILL MAKE THEIR DEBUT

by Vic Bishop, Staff Writer Waking Times The world has been watching footage of the massive explosion in Beirut’s main city port yesterday, causing widespread speculation as to whether or not this was a covert military operation employing some new generation of tactical small-yield nuclear weapons. So far, all indications seem to be that this blast was the result of fatal mishandling of hazardous materials, and no faction has stepped up to take responsibility for this as an attack. The official story is that a fire in a fireworks factory ignited a six year old cache of ammonium nitrate that was … Continue reading 3 OTHER MASSIVE EXPLOSIONS THAT LEFT US WONDERING WHEN TACTICAL NUKES WILL MAKE THEIR DEBUT

Why South Africa’s Military May ‘Somehow Get Involved’ in Situation in Northern Mozambique

by Oleg Burunov Northern Mozambique has been in the grip of a jihadist insurgency since 2017, with the violence having reportedly already killed more than 1,000 people there. In an article published on the website Conversation, political scientist Theo Neethling from the Bloemfontein-based University of the Free State, focused on South Africa’s position pertaining to an increase in “deadly violence” in the northern parts of Mozambique. “There is now even a possibility that the South African National Defence Force might become involved in [Mozambique’s] most northern Cabo Delgado province, with a view to ending [… the] litany of atrocities, abductions and … Continue reading Why South Africa’s Military May ‘Somehow Get Involved’ in Situation in Northern Mozambique

The science behind the bombing of Hiroshima

Some 135,000 people were killed when the US dropped an atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima in Japan on 6 August 1945. Those who survived suffered radiation sickness and severe burns – and the city was utterly destroyed. Here, Jason Goodyer, commissioning editor of BBC Focus Magazine, reveals the devastating aftermath of bombing and explains the science behind it… The US produced the first nuclear weapons during the Second World War following extensive scientific research dubbed the Manhattan Project. When they dropped two bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, the world had never experienced anything … Continue reading The science behind the bombing of Hiroshima

Inside the US government’s plans to blow up the moon

By Reed Tucker Blow up the moon. It sounds like the grandiose plan of a James Bond villain. Only the idea came, not from a fictional villain, but the government of the United States of America. The secret mission, code-named “Project A119,” was conceived at the dawn of the space race by an Air Force division located at New Mexico’s Kirtland Air Force Base. A June 1959 report entitled “A Study of Lunar Research Flights” outlined plans to explode the bomb on the moon’s “terminator” — the area between the part of the surface that’s illuminated by the sun and the … Continue reading Inside the US government’s plans to blow up the moon

Experts Say Tear Gas Is Dangerous, Especially During the Pandemic

The widespread use of tear gas amid a respiratory pandemic has experts worried that it may worsen Covid-19 infections. BY LISA SONG WHEN AMIRA CHOWDHURY joined a protest in Philadelphia against police violence last Monday, she wore a mask to protect herself and others against the coronavirus. But when officers launched tear gas into the crowd, Chowdhury pulled off her mask as she gasped for air. “I couldn’t breathe,” she said. “I felt like I was choking to death.” Chowdhury was on a part of the Vine Street Expressway that ran underground. Everyone panicked as gas drifted into the dark, semi-enclosed space, … Continue reading Experts Say Tear Gas Is Dangerous, Especially During the Pandemic

Why Was Japan Blind To Its Own Weaknesses During World War II?

Japan initiated its World War II campaign on the basis of a series of assumptions and unknowns. by Warfare History Network Planning a war requires assumptions. However, there should be as few assumptions as possible, otherwise one can assume away all one’s problems. Japanese shortfalls in resources influenced their assumptions in planning for World War II. Because Japan could not successfully fight a long war, planners assumed it would be short—in accordance with the decisive battle doctrine. One big naval battle with the U.S. Pacific Fleet, early in the war, and Japan would emerge victorious. The U.S., on the contrary, always … Continue reading Why Was Japan Blind To Its Own Weaknesses During World War II?