What to Do When You Need $100, Fast

Photo by CafeCredit

by Kristin Wong

A new poll from Bloomberg suggests that almost half of Americans would have a hard time affording a $100 emergency, like a speeding ticket, medical bill, or other unexpected expense. Consider the idea that maybe this says less about the financial habits of Americans than it does our garbage economy.

Stop Blaming It All on Bad Money Habits

People are quick to judge when it comes to just about everything, but money seems to kill empathy faster than any other topic. Have massive student loan debt? You were stupid for going to college. Can’t afford your medical bills? Shouldn’t have bought an iPhone. Don’t have a job? Youmust be lazy.

None of that could possibly have anything to do with the fact that, for years now, wage growth has been stagnant and the job market has been unstable—when asked how they get paid, a quarter of those polled said, “it depends on the week.”

Bloomberg’s poll also found that 28% of respondents were worried about being able to pay for a mere $10 emergency. At this point, are we seriously still going to blame avocado toast?

That said, if you’re one of the many who struggles to afford a $100 emergency, you need an emergency fund more than anyone. The trouble is, people blame your bad financial habits, which is completely discouraging and likely only makes you want to give up altogether—don’t! Here’s some judgment-free info on what you can do when you’re strapped for cash and an emergency arises.

Let’s say you do get a speeding ticket and you have absolutely nothing saved. This is typically when people make desperate decisions that can push them into a downward spiral of debt, which typically leads to more desperate decisions and more debt.

Here are the worst options for financing an emergency:

  • Payday loans: With sky-high fees and interest rates, payday loans are a notorious debt trap and probably the last place you want to turn, especially if your income varies on a weekly basis. One late payment and you’re screwed.
  • Debt settlement: This isn’t always a debt trap, but it certainly can be. ClearPoint Credit Counseling Solutions explains that this is “a form of debt relief that is considered by financial experts to be extremely dangerous.” Debt settlement usually includes fees and rigid contracts—if you miss a payment, you could lose all of your money, and none of it will go toward your debt.
  • High-interest credit cards: This is probably a slightly better, less predatory option than the above, but only slightly. Miss a payment and you’re on the hook for fees and interest. That said, some credit card companies are willing to work with you and might lower your monthly minimum so you can at least avoid a late payment fee.

And here are some better alternatives:

  • Peer-to-peer lending: Sites like LendingClub and Prosper connect borrowers to regular people who loan their money so they can earn interest on it. As NerdWallet explains, your loan is funded by individual investors and the interest rate is determined by how much risk they’re willing to accept. The lender handles the paperwork and payments.
  • Credit union loans: Many credit unions offer short-term loans specifically designed to help people going through a rough patch. The terms are usually a hell of a lot better than payday loans and they consider applicants with poor credit, too. “Credit union lending has traditionally been at the heart of the credit union movement,” Samantha Paxson, Chief Marketing and Experience Officer at CO-OP Financial Services, told us in an email. “Individual credit unions offer loans at lower rates than banks because they are member-owned—people helping people; interest rates are lower because that is the motive, not profit.”
  • Small Dollar Loans: Through the FDIC’s Small Dollar Loan program, some banks offer “affordable” small loans to customers in a bind. NerdWallet explains more here, but generally, “affordable” means interest rates can’t be higher than 36%, which is still a lot, but it’s much less than the 200% interest rate (considering the fees they charge) you’ll get with a payday loan.

Seriously, if nothing else, just stay away from payday loans.

Why You Need an Emergency Fund

Ultimately, of course, you need an emergency fund. This is easier said than done, but consider this: an emergency fund gives you power and control over not only your finances but many other aspects of your life, too. (Here’s some recommended reading: A Story of a Fuck Off Fund.) When you have that money saved, you’re less likely to make rash and desperate choices. For once, you’ll have some breathing room in your life.

If you have to build an emergency fund from scratch, it’s best to start small. (Here’s how I did it. I’m not saying what worked for me will absolutely work for everyone else, but it may help.)

Most experts recommend saving between three to six months’ worth of living expenses, but if you’re struggling just to get by, this probably seems like a pipe dream. Instead, make that $100 your goal and look for ways to save a few bucks here and there, wherever you can find the cash. It might mean picking up overtime, selling some stuff, or looking for ways to save on each and every one of your monthly bills.

Ideally, you’ll keep your emergency fund in a separate savings account so you can’t touch it, and while some banks require a minimum balance to keep your account open, many of them don’t. A few of those include: Ally, Discover Bank, and Synchrony. Best of all, those banks don’t charge monthly fees.

http://twocents.lifehacker.com/what-to-do-when-you-need-100-fast-1795373661

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WHY LIVING WITH LESS CAN ACTUALLY MAKE YOU HAPPIER

by Phillip Schneider, Staff Writer, Waking Times

Will having more wealth actually make you happier? According to a number of studies an addition to your income isn’t only unlikely to make you happier, but it can make those around you less happy, and you for the fear of losing it.

To explain, we must first look at a study from the National Bureau of Economic Research. Two economists, David Blanchflower of Dartmouth and Andrew Oswald of Warwick, set out to document the relation that age has to overall happiness. What they found was that as income tends to increase steadily over time, happiness follows a U-shape pattern, dipping to its lowest point at around age 45, then quickly climbing up thereafter.

A large-scale survey from the General Social Survey, which included around 20,000 men and 25,000 women of 16 years and older supports these findings. After asking Americans to rank their happiness on a 3 point scale ranging from “very happy” to “pretty happy” to “not too happy”, they found a resulting average of 2.2, or just over “pretty happy”. The Eurobaromoter, after conducting a similar survey on close to 400,000 men and women in 11 European countries from 1975 to 1998 found that the average self-assessed happiness score across Europe is 3 out of 4.

After further investigation, Oswald and Blanchflower found that the age of any given person in the developing world is more powerful in determining overall happiness than a halving or doubling of income. Also, they found that people of every gender and income have become enormously less happy throughout the past century. The difference in levels of happiness between those born in the 1960’s vs the 1920’s is the same effect as a tenfold difference in income, despite the fact that the younger generation is far more prosperous.

“I thought, if I could make 10 million dollars then it must be too easy. In fact, I honestly thought, everyone else had probably already made 11 million dollars. So then I felt poor again. I now needed 100 million dollars to be happy.” ~James Altucher

What could explain this sharp decrease in happiness over time? Well, one of the largest societal changes that occurred throughout the 20th century was the onset of a mass consumerist culture. Before the roaring 1920’s, life was much simpler and people didn’t have strong desires for material things beyond the basics to live a fulfilling life like we do today.

On a scientific level, the ultimate reward for the purchase of a new watch, car, or other status symbol is a short-term release in dopamine which triggers a brief period of personal satisfaction. This is why we feel good after buying new things and it’s where the term “retail therapy” comes from. However, the happiness one gets from material worth is short-lived. After time, the buyer will revert back to their original demeanor, while obtaining a sense of comfort and security from those new things they bought.

From this perspective, it begins to make sense why prosperous people in the developing world are some of the most prone to depression; they become afraid of losing what they have which their peers don’t. In fact, those on the opposite end are shown to have the reverse effect and often become more depressed when around those with greater wealth. Contrary to popular belief that areas of high poverty produce higher homicide rates, it is actually those with the highest income disparity.

“Riches leave a man always as much and sometimes more exposed than before to anxiety, to fear and to sorrow.” ~Adam Smith

About the Author

Phillip Schneider is a student and a staff writer for Waking Times.

This article (Why Living With Less Can Actually Make You Happier) was originally created and published by Waking Times and is published here under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Phillip Schneider and WakingTimes.com. It may be re-posted freely with proper attribution, author bio, and this copyright statement.

http://www.wakingtimes.com/2017/05/16/living-less-can-actually-make-happier/

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Study Suggests Money Alone Won’t Make You Happy (Even if You’re Rich)

by John McDermott

Our culture is filled with aphorisms and cautionary tales about the corrupting effect of money. “Money doesn’t buy happiness.” “Money is the root of all evil.”

Yet our collective obsession with money and consumerism persists.

A new study from SUNY Buffalo confirms that being fixated on money is indeed unhealthy. When people base their self-worth on their financial success, they’re more likely to suffer from a host of psychological issues, including higher levels of anxiety and helplessness. People who tie their self-worth to their financial success also tend to use more more words that describe negative emotions, such as “sadness” and “anger,” according to the study.

Perhaps the most interesting aspect of the study, though, was that these results were true regardless of class and financial status. In other words, rich people consumed with amassing wealth are just as unhappy as poor ones.

“Basing self-worth on financial success predicts psychological well-being independent of variables [such as wealth and economic class],” says psychology professor Lora Park, lead author on the study. “We do find, however, that people who experience more economic hardship are more likely to base their self-esteem on financial success.”

As Park mentions, ours is a consumer culture that tends to equate a person’s bank account with their intellect and general competence. So it’s easy to understand why poor Americans might view their situation as an indictment of their character.

That rich people are equally affected suggests that, when money is a goal in and of itself, no amount of it will ever provide a person with the psychological fulfillment they so desperately desire. “Beyond a certain point, more money doesn’t lead to greater happiness,” Park says.

Indeed, in a separate study from 2010, Princeton University researchers found that people’s happiness increases with their salary, but only up to $75,000 a year. Any income gains beyond $75,000 have no tangible effect on a person’s well-being.

Park’s study doesn’t mean it’s bad to be money-conscious, however. People are fully capable of being knowledgeable about personal finance and maintaining their mental health, as long as that personal finance knowledge doesn’t evolve into the pursuit of wealth simply for the sake of it.

https://melmagazine.com/study-suggests-money-alone-wont-make-you-happy-even-if-you-re-rich-91f72b709e4c

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How Your Credit Rating Came to Define Your Life—And Your Ability to Buy Almost Anything

Life as we know it in 21st-century America is dictated by your credit score. Those mysterious three digits — decided in secret, and as vulnerable to simple accounting mistakes as to willful misdeeds — are the biggest factor in whether the bank decides to give you that life-saving loan; whether the dealership will sell you that car; whether the store will give you that credit to tide you over till payday. All of that can seem arbitrary, unfair and mysterious. Of course, we can’t help with the first two — the arbitrary and unfair nature of it all — but we can help clear up the mystery as to how these three little numbers have come to define our lives.

Where the Credit Score Originated

In the early 1900s, merchants who wanted to sell stuff to customers on credit found that the best way of figuring out which customers would pay on time was simply to talk to other merchants. “City merchants realized that if they could pool their knowledge of which customers could be trusted and which could not, they would all benefit by being able to extend more credit and make more sales, while having fewer losses from the deadbeats who wouldn’t pay,” says Adam Jusko, CEO of CreditCardCatalog.com, a credit card comparison and information site.

The first American credit company, Retail Credit Company, went from merchant to merchant collecting their customers’ payment habits, simplified into one of three categories: “Prompt,” “Slow” or “Requires Cash.” They then compiled this information in a pamphlet called “The Merchant’s Guide,” and sold subscriptions for $25 a year (a giant sum of money at the time).

Demand soon skyrocketed, and as communication systems in the U.S. became more advanced, they found themselves able to collect information on more and more consumers across the country. Eventually, Retail Credit Company became Equifax, while TransUnion and Experian — the two other companies that, with Equifax, make up the big three of the contemporary credit rating game — arrived on the scene as competitors.

It wasn’t until the second half of the 20th century, however, that the credit landscape we know today started to take shape. Up to this point, credit reporting agencies were neither regulated in what information they could collect, nor required to reveal what data was collected that might lead lenders to deny a loan. Even more, they weren’t just collecting data on payments, but also “lifestyle” (i.e., information such as sexual orientation, marital status, drinking habits and cleanliness).

After enough public uproar, the government passed the Fair Credit Reporting Act of 1970, which forced credit reporting agencies to be more consistent in the way they rated consumers, limited how much information they could keep (and for how long) and forced them to be more transparent about how they scored things. After much trial and error, the Fair, Isaac and Company (FICO) score was born. It’s basically an algorithm that analyzes consumers’ past behavior to predict future behavior — or omniscient data that decides, just like those olden-day merchants, whether or not you’re a respectable, trustworthy citizen.

What the Numbers Mean

Since the majority of lenders in the U.S. use the FICO score, your consumption habits — including how timely you are with your bill payments — are run through that algorithm, which spits out your position on a spectrum between 300 and 850 (the closer you are to 850 the better). The FICO equation is often altered to better reflect contemporary spending habits, but generally, the score weights certain behaviors more heavily than others:

  • 35 percent of your score is based on your credit history — more specifically, how much of a delinquent you are. You can get dinged for foreclosure, bankruptcy, tax liens and consistent late payments on things like rent and bills. These incidents can take up to seven years to stop affecting your credit score.
  • 30 percent of your score is related to how often and to what extent you utilize your current credit card. So if you’ve got a limit of $1,000 and consistently spend $750, you’re at 75 percent utilization rate. To lenders, this looks like you’re thirsty to spend every penny you’re given, which like anything that could be described as “thirsty,” is a risk. According to FICO, the sweet spot for utilization is 30 percent. So even if you’re paying off your credit cards on time, consistently maxing them out is a bad idea.
  • 15 percent is based on how long you’ve had credit lines open, so don’t be too hasty to close old, unused credit cards.
  • 10 percent is how many credit cards you have open, since lenders like to see that other lenders have trusted you. Since this is a lightly weighted factor, though, it doesn’t mean you should say yes to every cashier offering you a store credit card.
  • The remaining 10 percent of your score is based on inquiries into your credit — not inquiries you’ve made yourself, but inquiries made by other lenders. If lenders see you’ve recently applied for a ton of credit cards or loans, they’re going to think you’re either untrustworthy and take your score down a notch…

more…

https://melmagazine.com/how-your-credit-rating-came-to-define-your-life-and-your-ability-to-buy-almost-anything-c071792bd211

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Goldman Sachs Claims Propping Up ‘The Economy is Great!’, Funds Syrian War

by Christina Sarich, Guest Waking Times

The age of parasitic capitalism still hasn’t sputtered to its final death. Among the larger players is Goldman Sachs, the very same megabank that the oligarchs use to fund terrorism – like the latest foray into Syria. Goldman Sachs is known for money laundering, billion-dollar-lobbying for the ease of punishment for corporations who launder said money, drug pushing, defrauding investors, war profiteering, and now, outright lying in order to keep their grimy claws on as much government-baptized cash as possible.

Annual bonuses to the Goldman Sachs’ elite were recently topped off at $23 billion, but that still isn’t enough funny money to keep the masses hysterical and dazed. Goldman Sachs’ top lawyer is also accused of being the cabal’s go-to guy when the natives get restless, but to keep the rhetoric around a great economy – restored by a certain president in charge, we’re now expected to ignore a sick and lackluster economy based on Goldman Sachs’ charts and graphs. But there’s another story unfolding which even evil bankers can’t corrupt.

Goldman just tried to justify a collapse in loan growth, which has reached its slowest pace in 6 years. It is expected to peter out completely soon. When no one is taking out loans, it’s because no one is making money and they can’t qualify for them.

Banks need us to borrow money, because that’s how they earn usury-level interest rates based on the fractional banking system. Unless they are planning to collapse an economy completely, they need to maintain loan rates and employment at a certain level so that we will continue to “agree to our own confinement,” as Dr. Brad Evans explains it in this amazing interview with Russell Brand:


In order to perpetuate a certain illusion, Goldman is trying to paint a rosy picture concerning the financial climate while we are observing the worst mortgage applications number since the 90s financial crisis. U.S. consumer demand for mortgages imploded at a pace indicative of an outright recession.

Despite this, the Fed is hiking rates further which will also crash the housing market – all as it has been designed to do. We’re supposed to believe the Great Recession that began 8 years ago is ending, and that the economy is recovering enough for the Federal Reserve Chair to implement its second rate-hike in just a few months – but what we’ve got is a false market, propped up with the usual criminal shenanigans of Goldman, the Fed and other key financial manipulators.

The Fed conveniently waited until after US elections to raise the rates. Why? What are they really trying to do – especially now that we’re all being dragged into WWIII? As Dr. Ron Paul has stated, more than $16-trillion-worth of transactions have been conducted with overseas banks. Foreign banks are a major recipient of Federal Bank Funds. This is part of the reason so many people want to audit the Fed. It is likely that with a full audit, the money trail for the current warmongering situation would be exposed. Dr. Paul says,

“The reason to have an audit is to find out what they’re hiding. The information they’re most protective of are the details of where many trillions of dollars used in the bailout went, and what the collateral was.”

He continues, “We want to know the details of what the agreements were,” Paul says, “and whether any of that money will be recouped.”

And more importantly, why do banks like Goldman and the Feds keep pushing war to prop up their false fronts? The Fed has already publicly admitted to rigging the stock market, and we know that Goldman Sachs is overrun with criminals. If we follow the money – it becomes very clear who is funding terror in the world today.

Considering there is now circulating, a declassified CIA memo which planned for a Syrian Regime collapse as early as 1986 – you have to wonder what money has changed hands?

About the Author
Christina Sarich is a staff writer for Waking Times. She is a writer, musician, yogi, and humanitarian with an expansive repertoire. Her thousands of articles can be found all over the Internet, and her insights also appear in magazines as diverse as Weston A. Price, NexusAtlantis Rising, and the Cuyamungue Institute, among others.
This article (Goldman Sachs Claims Propping Up ‘The Economy is Great!’, Funds Syrian War) was originally created and published by The Mind Unleashed and is re-posted here with permission. 

http://www.wakingtimes.com/2017/04/17/goldman-sachs-claims-propping-economy-great-funds-syrian-war/

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Jon Hamm Is Really Smart About Money

Tracy Moore

It’s easy for very wealthy people to act like having money isn’t such a big deal. “Anyone who thinks money is ever ‘just money’ couldn’t have much of it,” as Charles Van Doren says in the movie Quiz Show.

But occasionally a person with quite a lot of money demonstrates that he still thinks reasonably and practically about what money is good for. Such is the case with the ridiculously symmetrical, highly objectified Mad Men star Jon Hamm, who told Wealth Simple his thoughts on stacking paper for their money diaries series.

First off, Hamm is not a lifelong blueblood — he’s held plenty of lowly service jobs that taught him about the value of hard work:

I was a busboy and a dishwasher, and eventually I worked my way up the ladder and became a waiter. Sweet Rose was a sweet place. I learned how to cook and how to keep a clean kitchen. I learned how to be nice to people and to ask for help when I need it. I learned to love work and find meaning in it. To this day, I like going to work, clocking in and clocking out, the satisfaction of a job well done.

He knows firsthand how service jobs foster compassion for humanity — something rich people are notably bad at:

The appreciation you have for anyone working in a service capacity goes up radically the longer you work a service job yourself — you quickly learn what a difference a little bit of kindness and common courtesy can make for people. It’s important to know how to treat people, and to learn how to respond when someone you’re working with is having a bad day.

He worked as a teacher at his high school in St. Louis, and learned how undercompensated they are, so now he donates his money to students there:

Teachers in general are pretty under-respected and underpaid. That’s a real drag. Investing in higher teacher salaries is one of the most obvious things we could do to improve life in our society. I spent two years teaching drama, and then came back to L.A. Since then, I’ve found a little success, and now I’ve been able to endow a scholarship for John Burroughs students in my mother’s name: the Deborah Garner Hamm Memorial Scholarship. We just helped one kid to graduate college, and another one is working his way through right now. That’s been a gratifying way for me to spend some money.

He knows that money isn’t magic happy juice:

Money, for me, is a means to an end: to pay your bills and eat. Growing up, we were never rich, but I was around money a lot — I had friends who had money. And I didn’t see that people with money seemed any happier than those who got by on less. I’ve never been driven by money — there are more important things to life.

But he doesn’t pretend not to need it, either:

But not having money can be a hindrance — it can make life hard, and you spend time worrying about not having it. To me, the main reason to have money is to remove the hindrances that accompany being broke. Once those hindrances are out of the way, it doesn’t matter if you have a ton of money or just a comfortable amount.

Sure, that’s easy to say when your net worth is reportedly $30 million, but at least he recognizes it can’t solve his shitty life problems, either. Hamm recently went to rehab to deal with alcohol abuse and ended his long-term relationship with Jennifer Westfeldt in the public eye—both the kinds of problems money simultaneously helps to create and to fix, but cannot shield you from.

Yet all this gives him something else money can’t buy: perspective.

Some people say that the older you get, the wiser you become and the easier life gets, but I don’t find that to really hold true. As you get older, making decisions can become even harder, since it feels like there’s so much more at stake. There’s more at stake with relationship stuff, with career stuff, and with money stuff. I think the best advice I have for anyone facing tough decisions is not to let the stakes loom so large in their mind that making a decision becomes impossible. You have to keep a healthy sense of perspective — don’t sweat every choice too much or overthink things. If you take a wrong step, you’ll find the right one.

Thanks for the wisdom boner, Jon Hamm.

https://melmagazine.com/jon-hamm-is-really-smart-about-money-728d7491bb84

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Money and U.S. Dollar Occult Symbolism

Waking Times

The great seal on the back of the US dollar bill (above) is full of occult symbolism. Even the most hardened sceptic would have a difficult time dismissing the following features on the bill as mere ‘coincidence.’

  • 13  leaves in the olive branches
  • 13 bars & stripes
  • 13 arrows
  • 13 letters in: ‘E Pluribus Unum’
  • 13 stars in the green crest above
  • 13 stones in the pyramid
  • 13 letters in ’Annuit Coeptis’

Then just below the pyramid there’sNovus Ordo Seclorum’   that translates, ‘New Secular Order’ or ‘New World Order.’  Why the number 13? What about the other features?

I will answer later. First, a couple of significant questions seldom asked.

What are the 2 biggest forms of enslavement on humanity?

-Answer: The monetary system and religion.

Both are massively entrenched in deception which is the basis of how the enslavement on humanity works: In many ways, the more attached to either the more immersed one becomes in illusion… I’m sure you’ve heard it saidIt’s a mad world’. Indeed, it is a mad world and in many ways connections to money andreligion have been the causes.

Both were invented by the hidden powers that be  about 5,000 years ago in the first ever known cities such as Babylon, Mesopotamia and Nineveh in ancient Sumer. Basically, the invention of the monetary system has enslaved humanity on the physical level, while religion has enslaved on the spiritual level stultifying genuine spiritual growth. Many people are totally unaware of this, that they have been stitched up and how over the years the inventors the ruling elite have used both money and religion purely for power, financial and political gains.

I will be covering religion extensively in other messages (apologies for putting this subject on hold in the way I have).  This message is a brief expose on the money scam and how it is symbolised in the Western world using the American dollar bill as an example, giving rise to how the hidden powers that be work behind the scenes and what you can do after you’ve got the realization that you’re being played.

What is money?

-Answer: Money is a means by which energy is exchanged.  The economic system is based on work energy exchanges from person to person during the supply and demand.

Let me give some simple examples. I am a musician and let’s say I have received payment for playing a live musical performance.  This payment represents the energy I had to put in to make that performance happen.

Let’s say I then give money earned from this performance to a mechanic. The money or payment the mechanic receives is for the energy he had to put in to repair my car. Then, the mechanic gives this money earned to someone else for their work energy related services to him… and so on.

-In short, throughout the working world money goes where the energy flows in the exchanging, but here’s the rub.

In the above examples let’s say in every case the money paid out was fair and fitting to the amount of energy each person had put in for their services. However, in the world of work this is definitely not the case. There is a great imbalance:

Most people (like yourself?) in order to earn their pay check will have to put in far more than they’ll ever receive. That is, instead of receiving a balanced payment for their efforts most of the money made will go to their corporation.  The fact that giant corporations make huge pre-tax profits each year and can get away with paying some of its workforce minimum wages tells you there is a huge imbalance.  –This imbalance, unfair returns on people’s daily work energy contributions occurs on a global scale. It has been orchestrated by the hidden powers that be and it doesn’t end there.

 

The Biggest Scam In The History Of Mankind – Who Owns The Federal Reserve? Hidden Secrets of Money

There’s a whole list of other bloodsucking systems including many unfair taxations, banking and financial scams… (video) designed to siphon off the people’s hard earned cash to just a few very wealthy individuals: The ruling elite have deceptively manipulated the world financial system to such an extent that they control more money than the entire world’s governments stuck together. This means that they have usurped the energies from we-the-people to such an extent that we have become physically and mentally enslaved.

Now back to the dollar bill

As I have said in previous blogs the hidden powers that be or ruling elite are heavily into the occult. As seen printed on the back of a dollar bill (page1) the pyramid and all-seeing-eye embodies the secret occult organisations that continue to control America.  Since this symbolism is frequently used in numerous corporate logos it may also serve as a statement by the ruling elite that they control the world through business and banking.

Since the creation of the 1 dollar bill it has apparently been understood that number 13 indicates the colonial states with a Christian nation social order representing freedom, equality and peace… but actually the symbolism represents the opposite, something quite unchristian and sinister in its secrecy.

The 13 not only represents the number of families making up the ruling elite but it is also rooted in satanic occultism. It was a mystical number to the Babylonians and Egyptians.  Today, it is a mystical number to the Masons. Each item count of 13 given on page 1 represents in occult terms the plans for a one world government takeover New World Order (NWO) where we will be living in a global fascist dictatorship like that in George Orwell’s fiction novel 1984. So, in more detail:

  • 13 bars & stripes – Represents opposing God and the churches of Christ.
  • 13 arrows in the right claw of eagle -Represents war and military power.
  • 13 letters in: ‘E Pluribus Unum’ – ‘Out of Many’ is the plan to bring together all the world’s governments, religions and money systems into one for control in the NWO. Incidentally, the planned new religion is Satanism.
  • 13 stars in the green crest above the eagle -Stars arranged in a hexagram known as ‘mogen David’ used in occult practice to evoke Satan.
  • 13 stones or steps in the pyramid -the number of satanic families controlling the planet.
  • 13 letters in ’Annuit Coeptis’ -’Announcing the beginning or arrival’ (of the NWO).
  • 13 leaves in the olive branches -Symbolises peace (oh really?!)

In the bill, the all-seeing eye is that of Lucifer (Satan). Notice how it is surrounded with light. This represents the illumination and those in the satanic occult practices are the ‘illuminated ones’ because they have the secret knowledge and understand the hidden meanings. So called the all-seeing eye because it knows and sees everything, just the kind of thing you’d expect in a big brother is watching you global fascist dictatorship…

more…

About the Author

Paul A. Philips is the author of NewParadigm.ws.

This article (Money and U.S. Dollar Occult Symbolism) was originally created and published by NewParadigm.ws and is re-posted here with permission. 

http://www.wakingtimes.com/2017/04/11/money-u-s-dollar-occult-symbolism/

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