“Highly Secure”? Security Guards at US Nuclear Weapons Base Used LSD

The Mind Unleashed By Jake Johnson / Creative Commons / Common Dreams There are a lot of safe and responsible places people have found over the years to ingest hallucinogens in order to experience their pleasures and explore the challenges their potent properties can present, but it’s a judgement statement to declare that a U.S. military base which houses some of the world’s most powerful atomic weapons would qualify as such a place. Nevertheless, the Associated Press reports Thursday that U.S. service members charged with guarding U.S. nuclear weapons at a “highly secure” military facility in Wyoming “bought, distributed and used the hallucinogen LSD and other mind-altering illegal … Continue reading “Highly Secure”? Security Guards at US Nuclear Weapons Base Used LSD

WHAT A EVEN A SMALL SCALE NUCLEAR WAR WOULD DO TO PLANET EARTH

by Vic Bishop, Staff Writer Waking Times The mainstream media is cheering on the psychopaths in government as they deliberately stoke conflict with Russia and press further forward with the Neocon agenda of total global war. If the media were doing its job, however, they’d be asking questions and pursuing truth in governmental matters in order to contribute to the good of society and the betterment of the world. At issue in this looming conflict is the horrifying specter of nuclear war, and the threat of such an unwinnable conflict is higher today than at any point during the cold war. It seems … Continue reading WHAT A EVEN A SMALL SCALE NUCLEAR WAR WOULD DO TO PLANET EARTH

Chernobyl’s abandoned dogs create their own exclusion zone community

Chernobyl’s abandoned dogs create their own exclusion zone community by Lacy Cooke VIEW SLIDESHOW If you ever happen to visit Chernobyl, you might run across one of the roughly 300 stray dogs that reside there. After the 1986 disaster, residents weren’t allowed to bring their pets away with them, and many dogs were left behind. Today, their descendants still roam the area, and while their life isn’t easy, The Guardian reports they are “a playful example of global kindness and cooperation.” Around 300 stray dogs reside in the 2,600 square kilometer – or around 1,004 square mile – exclusion zone at Chernobyl in Ukraine. The Chernobyl Prayer, an oral history of … Continue reading Chernobyl’s abandoned dogs create their own exclusion zone community

I TOOK A TRIP TO CHERNOBYL’S EXCLUSION ZONE AND PHOTOGRAPHED IT IN INFRARED

by Vladimir Migutin We always hear praises of the might of Mother Nature, how it renders useless mans’ creations, and bears life above the ruins. Well, it’s something that is always felt, but never on such a huge scale. This place IS the place for these contrasts. It’s pretty hard to describe the overall atmosphere I experienced during this trip. Despite the events of 1986, the ruins, and the rust, I didn’t have grim feelings while traveling there. On the contrary, it felt like I was in a “kind of” paradise on a different planet. Thirty years after the fallout, while … Continue reading I TOOK A TRIP TO CHERNOBYL’S EXCLUSION ZONE AND PHOTOGRAPHED IT IN INFRARED

The deterrence myth

Detonation of nuclear device ‘Annie’ during Operation Upshot-Knothole, 1953, Nevada. Courtesy Wikipedia Nuclear deterrence continues to dominate international relations. Yet there is no proof it ever worked, nor that it ever will by David P Barash is an evolutionary biologist and professor of psychology at the University of Washington. His most recent book is Out of Eden: The Surprising Consequences of Polygamy (2016). With his wife, the psychiatrist Judith Eve Lipton, he is currently writing a book that critiques nuclear deterrence. Edited by Sam Haselby In his classic The Evolution of Nuclear Strategy (1989), Lawrence Freedman, the dean of British military historians and strategists, concluded: ‘The Emperor … Continue reading The deterrence myth

Why North Korea succeeded at getting nuclear weapons — when Iraq and Libya failed

This undated photo distributedby the North Korean government shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un celebrating what was said to be the test launch of an intermediate-range missile at an undisclosed location in North Korea. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service/AP) By Malfrid Braut-Hegghammer North Korea was considered too poor, authoritarian and vulnerable to succeed with its nuclear and missile programs. And yet Pyongyang has acquired advanced nuclear weapons capabilities — and, at the end of November, tested an intercontinental ballistic missile.Why has North Korea succeeded when other countries such as Iraq and Libya have failed?Three factors are central to North Korea’s success. This analysis draws on findings … Continue reading Why North Korea succeeded at getting nuclear weapons — when Iraq and Libya failed

What is radioactivity?

Radioactivity is a useful but dangerous phenomenon. ANDY CROSS / GETTY by LAUREN FUGE is an Adelaide-based author and science communicator. Radioactivity is a source of immense energy with a long and dangerous history. We owe the discovery of radioactivity to bad weather. French physicist Henri Becquerel was trying to study fluorescence, a phenomenon where certain materials glow when exposed to sunlight, but overcast days thwarted his experiments and so he wrapped his fluorescing uranium salts in cloth and left them in a drawer, along with a photographic plate and a copper cross. This simple serendipitous accident, in 1896, revealed the … Continue reading What is radioactivity?