REVISIONING JUNG’S IDEA OF SYNCHRONICITY

Paul Levy, Guest Waking Times Synchronicity is considered to be one of the most important ideas emerging out of the twentieth century. Jung coined the term synchronicity to describe a category of experience that defied and had an altogether different logic than the widely accepted and virtually unquestioned logic of linear sequential causality (in which a cause precedes an effect in linear time), which was generally thought to be the only kind of causality operating in the universe at the time. Bringing forth the notion of synchronicity was a bold and heretical act by Jung that was a radical departure from … Continue reading REVISIONING JUNG’S IDEA OF SYNCHRONICITY

Buddhism’s Biggest Open Secret

Taking a look at adverse effects of meditation in Eastern and Western Buddhist practice By Wendy Biddlecombe Agsar  I began moping around in a dark, melancholy state. I was always nervous and afraid, weak and timid in mind and body. The skin under my arms was constantly wet with perspiration. I found it impossible to concentrate on what I was doing. I sought out dark places where I could go to be alone and just sat there motionless like a dead man. Neither acupuncture, moxacautery [burning dried flowers on or near the skin], nor medical potions brought me any relief. These are … Continue reading Buddhism’s Biggest Open Secret

The most compelling representations of Satan in world literature

KEY TAKEAWAYS Although infamous today, the character of Satan has been reinvented many times over the course of human history.  Generally speaking, he developed from Dante and Milton’s tragic and misguided villain into Goethe’s and Bulgakov’s sardonic antihero.  When placed side by side, these iterations can tell us a great deal about the time of their creators. by Tim Brinkhof By taking Satan out of the religious context, storytellers explored the nature of sin in new ways. Given how familiar we are with Satan today, it may come as a surprise to learn that the concept of the “great opposer” … Continue reading The most compelling representations of Satan in world literature

Love and Limerence: The Forgotten Psychologist Dorothy Tennov’s Revelatory Research into the Confusions of Bonding

“It may not be in contemplation of outer space that the greatest discoveries and explorations of the coming centuries will occur, but in our finally deciding to heed the dictum of self-understanding.” BY MARIA POPOVA “Love is like a fever which comes and goes quite independently of the will,” Stendhal wrote in his landmark 1822 “crystallization” model of how we fall in and out of love. What he was actually describing, however — in those Cartesian epochs before it was acceptable or even conceivable that matters of feeling could be functions of mental activity and subjects of the reasoned study we … Continue reading Love and Limerence: The Forgotten Psychologist Dorothy Tennov’s Revelatory Research into the Confusions of Bonding

THE SUBTLE ART OF OFFENDING PEOPLE

Gary Z McGee, Contributor Waking Times “Of what use is a philosopher who doesn’t hurt anybody’s feelings?” ~Diogenes of Sinope We live in a world filled with thin-skinned status quo junkies walking on eggshells. Everyone is afraid of offending and being offended. Everyone is afraid of getting real. Everyone is afraid—full stop. Sentimentality abounds. Meek and soppy simpletons rule the day. Snowflakes with hair triggers are being triggered left and right. It’s a veritable minefield of mawkishness and cry-me-a-river Karens out there. Oh. Fucking. Well. Let them weep. Let them cry. Let them fall all over themselves in a cartoon crisis … Continue reading THE SUBTLE ART OF OFFENDING PEOPLE

Please Enjoy Your Food

It could be the best meditation you do all day. By Edward Espe Brown From time to time, Tricycle features articles from the Inquiring Mind archive. Inquiring Mind, a Buddhist journal that was in print from 1984–2015, has a growing number of articles from its back issues available at www.inquiringmind.com (help Inquiring Mind complete its archive by donating here). Today’s selection is from the Fall 1994  issue, On Having a Body. When we break for lunch at my Saturday meditation retreats, I often tell people, “Please enjoy your food.” All morning I have been offering various instructions in sitting and walking meditation, and by lunchtime we have also had … Continue reading Please Enjoy Your Food

Life, Death, and What Fills the Interlude with Meaning: Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Touching Diary Reflections on His Dying Mother and His Five-Year-Old Daughter

“I saw my little Una… so full of spirit and life that she was life itself. And then I looked at my poor dying mother, and seemed to see the whole of human existence at once, standing in the dusty midst of it.” BY MARIA POPOVA It is said that Orlando, inspired by the passionate real-life love Virginia Woolf shared with Vita Sackville-West, is “the longest and most charming love letter in literature” — said by Vita’s own son. But the most charming love letter in literature might be quite shorter and older and inspired by a very different kind of love — … Continue reading Life, Death, and What Fills the Interlude with Meaning: Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Touching Diary Reflections on His Dying Mother and His Five-Year-Old Daughter

It’s Not Irrational to Party Like It’s 1999

Contrary to what the philosopher said, passion can be a slave to reason. BY STEVEN PINKER Must we always follow reason? Do I need a rational argument for why I should fall in love, cherish my children, enjoy the pleasures of life? Isn’t it sometimes OK to go crazy, to be silly, to stop making sense? If rationality is so great, why do we associate it with a dour joylessness? Was the philosophy professor in Tom Stoppard’s play Jumpers right in his response to the claim that “the Church is a monument to irrationality?” The National Gallery is a monument to irrationality! … Continue reading It’s Not Irrational to Party Like It’s 1999

THE ART OF DEATHPROOFING

Gary Z McGee, Contributor Waking Times “Just as a well-filled day brings blessed sleep, so a well-employed life brings blessed death.” ~Leonardo Da Vinci Death comes to us all. But life does not, necessarily. Most of us live life half-alive, or half-dead, depending on how you look at it. Quiet desperation tends to rule the day. Most of us merely survive rather than vitally thrive. Ironically, death can help us with this conundrum. Death can help us live life more fully. It can help us go from mere survivor to resolute thriver. It puts life into perspective by teaching the living … Continue reading THE ART OF DEATHPROOFING

What Happens If We Recognize the Love Inside of Grief?

Accepting grief as a way to honor loss can help us open into a more intimate and heartfelt union with life itself. By Sharon Salzberg At times, pain can reach such a powerful level that it can be devastating. In spiritual life, we might call it the dark night of the soul. In interpersonal life, we call it grief, and this intense emotional experience does not limit itself to the loss of someone who has died. It can occur as the experience of nearly any kind of deep loss. I learned that in a poignant way from a man who was … Continue reading What Happens If We Recognize the Love Inside of Grief?