IN THE MIDST OF A TRAGIC HUMAN PANDEMIC, THE ENVIRONMENT IS FLOURISHING

by John Vibes, Truth Theory Waking Times As we have highlighted in a few different reports since the COVID-19 coronavirus quarantines began, the extreme decrease in human activity has given the planet some space to breathe. Obviously, the situation that the people of the world are dealing with right now is tragic, lives are being lost, and there are millions now facing unemployment due to the economic shutdown that has resulted from the quarantines. It is unfortunate that the world would only slow down after experiencing the type of suffering that we have seen in recent months, but the drastic drop … Continue reading IN THE MIDST OF A TRAGIC HUMAN PANDEMIC, THE ENVIRONMENT IS FLOURISHING

Enchanting Photos of Madeira’s Ancient Fanal Forest Filled With 500-Year-Old Trees

By Jessica Stewart  The island of Madeira is known for its dramatic landscape, which includes rugged mountains, volcanoes, and rocky beaches. But one of Madeira’s most unique treasures is an ancient forest where every step takes you inside a scene ripped from a fairy tale. Known for its enchanting morning fog, the Fanal forest is part of an ancient laurel forest. Thanks to incredible images by photographer Albert Dros, we’re transported into this dreamy landscape. Fanal is part of the Laurisilva forest, a UNESCO World Heritage Site known for its beauty and ecological importance. Incredibly, 15 to 40 million years ago, much … Continue reading Enchanting Photos of Madeira’s Ancient Fanal Forest Filled With 500-Year-Old Trees

STUDY REVEALS WHAT ALIENS MIGHT SEE IF THEY SPOTTED EARTH FROM SPACE

A view of the total lunar eclipse from Earth.Souhayl Ben Khaled, United Arab Emirates Astronomy Group For more than 20 years, astronomers have observed alien planets of myriad different compositions and masses, all spread out across the cosmos. But what if someone (or something) on those exoplanets was looking back at us, what would they see? Thanks to an intriguing new study, scientists have an answer. A study published Monday in the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics is the first to look at the Earth as though it were a foreign exoplanet, observing it from the outside as it transits in front of the Sun. … Continue reading STUDY REVEALS WHAT ALIENS MIGHT SEE IF THEY SPOTTED EARTH FROM SPACE

3 billion-year-old Earth had water everywhere, but not one continent, study suggests

By Mindy Weisberger Chemicals in rocks hinted at a world without continents. What did Earth look like 3.2 billion years ago? New evidence suggests the planet was covered by a vast ocean and had no continents at all. Continents appeared later, as plate tectonics thrust enormous, rocky land masses upward to breach the sea surfaces, scientists recently reported. They found clues about this ancient waterworld preserved in a chunk of ancient seafloor, now located in the outback of northwestern Australia.  Around 4.5 billion years ago, high-speed collisions between dust and space rocks formed the beginnings of our planet: a bubbling, molten sphere of magma that was thousands … Continue reading 3 billion-year-old Earth had water everywhere, but not one continent, study suggests

7.5 BILLION AND COUNTING: HOW MANY HUMANS CAN THE EARTH SUPPORT?

This article was originally published on The Conversation by Andrew D. Hwang.  Can the Earth support this many people indefinitely? Humans are the most populous large mammal on Earth today, and probably in all of geological history. This World Population Day, humans number in the vicinity of 7.5 to 7.6 billion individuals. Can the Earth support this many people indefinitely? What will happen if we do nothing to manage future population growth and total resource use? These complex questions are ecological, political, ethical – and urgent. Simple mathematics shows why, shedding light on our species’ ecological footprint. THE MATHEMATICS OF POPULATION GROWTH In an environment with unlimited natural resources, population … Continue reading 7.5 BILLION AND COUNTING: HOW MANY HUMANS CAN THE EARTH SUPPORT?

All we owe to animals

It is not enough to conserve species and ecosystems. We have an ethical duty to care for each individual animal on earth Jeff Sebo is a clinical assistant professor of environmental studies, affiliated professor of bioethics, medical ethics and philosophy, and director of the Animal Studies MA Program at New York University. He is co-author of Chimpanzee Rights (Routledge, 2018) and Food, Animals, and the Environment (Routledge, 2018). Edited by Pam Weintraub At the time of writing, Australia is on fire. The fires have killed at least 25 humans and more than a billion animals. Animals such as koalas are especially at risk, since their … Continue reading All we owe to animals

How Long Will Australia Be Livable?

Facing a future of fire, drought, and rising oceans, Australians will have to weigh the choice between getting out early or staying to fight. by BIANCA NOGRADY When tiny flakes of white ash started falling like warm snow from a sky sullen with smoke, we left. We had lived for weeks with the threat of two huge bushfires hanging over our small Australian town, advancing inexorably toward us from the north and the south. My hometown of Blackheath, perched at the top of the Blue Mountains, surrounded by stunning but drought-parched Australian wilderness, was in the center of this flaming … Continue reading How Long Will Australia Be Livable?