The Cost of Blood

When corporations run the government and any crime can be bought. BY CLAIRE NORTH The man whose name was sometimes Theo Miller had been twenty-two years old when they abolished human rights. The government insisted it was necessary to counter terrorism and bring stable leadership to the country. He’d voted for the opposition and felt very proud of himself, partially because he had a sense that this was the intangible right way of things, but mostly because it was the first time his new name had been tested at the polling station, and held up to scrutiny. The opposition didn’t have any … Continue reading The Cost of Blood

From Immigrant to Inventor: The Great Serbian-American Scientist Michael Pupin on the Value of a Penniless Immigrant Boy Full of Promise

Michael Pupin, 1916. “An immigrant can see things which escape the attention of the native.” BY MARIA POPOVA “Society has discovered discrimination as the great social weapon by which one may kill men without any bloodshed,”Hannah Arendt wrote in her timeless, increasingly timely meditation on the immigrant experience and the meaning of “refugee.” But discrimination is also a self-inflicted wound by which the society perpetrating it bleeds internally — not only because it lacerates the moral fabric of the culture, but because it is a means by which a society cheats itself of the vital polyphony of voices necessary for symphonic polity. That is … Continue reading From Immigrant to Inventor: The Great Serbian-American Scientist Michael Pupin on the Value of a Penniless Immigrant Boy Full of Promise

What is wrong with tolerance

Jewish Haim Addad posing with his Arabic neighbour near Djerba, Tunisia, May 2008. Photo by Patrick Zachmann/Magnum The ideal of religious tolerance has crippling flaws. It’s time to embrace a civic philosophy of reciprocity by Simon Rabinovitch is an assistant professor of history at Boston University. He is the author of Jewish Rites, National Rites: Nationalism and Autonomy in Late Imperial and Revolutionary Russia (2015) and the forthcoming Jewish Collective Rights: Religious Liberty and Modern States. Edited by Sam Haselby The purpose of religious tolerance has always been, and remains, to maintain the power and purity of the dominant religion in a given state. Most dominant … Continue reading What is wrong with tolerance

STUNNING new video reveals how Europe is “committing suicide” with open borders and political correctness

 by: Lance D Johnson (Natural News) European society is being flooded by migrants from North Africa, East Asia, and the Middle East. In 2015, over a million migrants made their way illegally into Europe, traveling by land and sea. Migrants from war-torn countries, including Iraq, Afghanistan, and Syria are taking advantage of open border policies in Europe. Citizens from Germany, Greece, Bulgaria, Italy, Cyprus, and Spain are losing their cultural heritageas their communities are forced to accommodate any and all migrants. These countries are failing to vet refugees and do not consider the repercussions of aimlessly flooding communities with displaced migrants.  Economic opportunities and resources are being … Continue reading STUNNING new video reveals how Europe is “committing suicide” with open borders and political correctness

Eugenics never went away

The Provincial Training School in Red Deer, Alberta, opened in October 1923 and was designated to be a residential institution for the training of people deemed ‘mentally defective’. Photo courtesy eugencisarchove.ca Thought eugenics died with the Nazis? Think again: the eugenic programme of sterilising the ‘unfit’ continues even today by Robert A Wilson is professor of philosophy at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia, and the founder of the network Philosophical Engagement in Public Life (PEiPL). His latest book is The Eugenic Mind Project (2018). Edited by Sam Dresser Eugenics was a mixture of science and social movement that aimed to improve the human race over generations. … Continue reading Eugenics never went away

Can Ambien make you racist? No, but it can bring negative emotions to the surface.

Actress Roseanne Barr attends the Disney ABC Television TCA Winter Press Tour on January 8, 2018, in Pasadena, California. (AFP/VALERIE MACON/Getty Images)  by NED DYMOKE After comedian Roseanne Barr described former Obama advisor Valerie Jarrett in racist terms on Twitter, ABC swiftly cancelled her sitcom, a revival of her popular 1980s show. Jarrett  has described Roseanne’s tweet as a teachable moment about race in America. Roseanne’s “defense” — if you could call it that — was to blame the racist tirade on Ambien. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that Ambien in and of itself doesn’t make you racist. The drug … Continue reading Can Ambien make you racist? No, but it can bring negative emotions to the surface.

The forgotten prophet

Benjamin Lay by William Williams c1750-1758, oil on panel. Courtesy National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution Radical Quaker Benjamin Lay was a pioneer of abolitionism, who lived what he preached. So why was he erased from history? by Marcus Rediker is distinguished professor of Atlantic history at the University of Pittsburgh and a senior research fellow at the Collège d’études mondiales in Paris. His latest book is The Fearless Benjamin Lay: The Quaker Dwarf Who Became the First Revolutionary Abolitionist (2017). Edited by Sam Dresser In September 1738, Benjamin Lay, a radical Quaker barely four feet tall, filled an animal bladder with bright red pokeberry juice, then … Continue reading The forgotten prophet