EXPERTS WARN CIVIL RIGHTS FALLOUT FROM COVID COULD BE FAR WORSE THAN THE PANDEMIC ITSELF

Raul Diego, Mint Press News Waking Times he very first executive order Joe Biden signed upon becoming the forty-sixth President of the United States was the national mask mandate he promised at the Democratic National Convention back in August. The order makes face coverings and social distancing mandatory on all federal property and a legal requisite for interstate commerce. The move signals a clear intent on the part of his administration to double down on the “authoritarian” emergency measures – as described in a recent paper from Oxford University – implemented in the wake of the pandemic crisis and sets the stage for what may be the … Continue reading EXPERTS WARN CIVIL RIGHTS FALLOUT FROM COVID COULD BE FAR WORSE THAN THE PANDEMIC ITSELF

The harms of gentrification

The exclusion of poorer people from their own neighbourhoods is not just a social problem but a philosophical one Daniel Putnam is a Furman Scholar at the School of Law at New York University. Edited by Sam Dresser In the Mission District in San Francisco, there’s a popular soccer field nestled between elegant Victorian homes and neighbourhood taquerías. Over the years, an informal system for using the field developed among locals. If there wasn’t enough space for everyone, some played while others watched from the sidelines. Once one team scored, the losing team would trade places with those who’d been on the … Continue reading The harms of gentrification

Unrest in your backyard

Rich nations with strong governments can no longer assume that political violence is a problem for other, poorer countries Mark Kukis is a non-resident fellow at the Quincy Institute and an assistant professor of social sciences at the Minerva Schools, where he teaches government. He is the author of Voices from Iraq: A People’s History, 2003-2009 (2011). Edited by Sam Haselby Thailand’s prime minister Prayuth Chan-ocha aired a dire warning to the thousands of protesters who thronged the streets of Bangkok for days in the summer of 2020 demanding his resignation. Prayuth accused the demonstrators of bringing Thailand to the brink of collapse. ‘If that … Continue reading Unrest in your backyard

What Trump and His Mob Taught the World About America

The allure of democracy was the nation’s best asset abroad, but the president squandered it by inciting political violence. by Anne Applebaum – Staff writer at The Atlantic We have promoted democracy in our movies and books. We speak of democracy in our speeches and lectures. We even sing about democracy, from sea to shining sea, in our national songs. We have entire government bureaus devoted to thinking about how we can help other countries become and remain democratic. We fund institutions that do the same. And yet by far the most important weapon that the United States of America has … Continue reading What Trump and His Mob Taught the World About America

IF THE COVID VACCINE INJURES YOU, YOU CAN’T SUE ANYONE—PROBABLY NOT EVEN THE GOV’T

Matt Agorist, The Free Thought Project Waking Times As TFTP reported this week, in a historical move, marking the fastest ever approved vaccine in history, it took the US government less time to approve a COVID-19 vaccine than it did for them to approve $600 checks for starving Americans. Naturally, this has fueled public mistrust as by the very definition of “long-term” studies, absolutely no long-term studies were conducted in regard to the vaccine. Adding to this mistrust is the fact that if you are harmed by the COVID-19 vaccine, Pfizer and Moderna have total immunity from liability and you will have no … Continue reading IF THE COVID VACCINE INJURES YOU, YOU CAN’T SUE ANYONE—PROBABLY NOT EVEN THE GOV’T

The three faces of racism

Inadvertent, habitual, explicit Why are black people stopped by police more than white people? Is it simply the actions of an explicitly  racist contingent? Or is there something more nuanced at play? Cognitive dissonance is at the heart of this insidious prejudice. By Berit Brogaard and Dimitria Gatzia.  Imagine that Max claims to be a committed environmentalist but continues to consume animal products. Since animal agriculture is one of the main causes of climate change, you may be inclined to think of him as a hypocrite. A hypocrite, after all, is someone who professes to hold beliefs one does not … Continue reading The three faces of racism

A brief history of human dignity

What is human dignity? Here’s a primer, told through 200 years of great essays, lectures, and novels. by Nicole Yeatman  Human dignity means that each of our lives have an unimpeachable value simply because we are human, and therefore we are deserving of a baseline level of respect. That baseline requires more than the absence of violence, discrimination, and authoritarianism. It means giving individuals the freedom to pursue their own happiness and purpose. We look at incredible writings from the last 200 years that illustrate the push for human dignity in regards to slavery, equality, communism, free speech and education. … Continue reading A brief history of human dignity

Inside the Lives of Immigrant Teens Working Dangerous Night Shifts in Suburban Factories

During the day, immigrant teenagers attend high school. At night, they work in factories to pay debts to smugglers and send money to family. The authorities aren’t surprised by child labor. They’re also not doing much about it. by Melissa Sanchez ProPublica Illinois is a nonprofit newsroom that investigates abuses of power. This story was co-published with Mother Jones and El País. It’s a little before 6 a.m. and still dark when Garcia gets home from work this October morning. The apartment where he lives with his aunt and uncle is silent. They’ve already left for their own jobs. After nine … Continue reading Inside the Lives of Immigrant Teens Working Dangerous Night Shifts in Suburban Factories

Street Photography Is Not a Crime. Let’s Keep it That Way.

The New York Daily News recently published an opinion piece by a writer named Jean Son titled “When your photograph harms me: New York should look to curb unconsensual photography of women” and I would like to address it here.  by BRANDON BALLWEG The premise of Jean Son’s article is that any photographing of women in public places constitutes “gender-based violence”, which I find hyperbolic and irresponsible. The author says that “there’s only been a few times in my life when New York let me down, and they all happened in broad daylight in some of our most recognizable public places.” Wow. Something … Continue reading Street Photography Is Not a Crime. Let’s Keep it That Way.

Don’t-Know Mind and the Election of Our Lives

We don’t know who’s going to win, or what’s going to happen. There’s a Buddhist teaching that works with exactly that. By David Loy Every individual has a responsibility to help guide our global family in the right direction. Good wishes are not sufficient; we must become actively engaged. –His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama Noam Chomsky recently warned that we are now living through the most dangerous moment in human history. He cited the climate crisis, threat of nuclear war, and rising authoritarianism, but a long list of other issues can be added, among them the COVID-19 pandemic, economic breakdown, … Continue reading Don’t-Know Mind and the Election of Our Lives