The Power of Laughing at Russia

‘If you are a good comedian in the U.S., you can have a late-night show. If you are a good comedian in Ukraine, you can destroy Russia.’ By Veronika Melkozerova, is a journalist based in Kyiv. She is the executive editor of the New Voice of Ukraine, an English-language news site. Late last month, a couple of days after Russian missiles hit Kyiv, killing a Ukrainian journalist; a few weeks after Russian forces laid siege to this city, my hometown; two months after Vladimir Putin’s forces invaded my homeland, I went down into a converted bomb shelter and laughed. A lot. And … Continue reading The Power of Laughing at Russia

PUTIN ISN’T THE ONLY AUTOCRAT MISUSING HISTORY

The Russian leader’s invasion of Ukraine is founded on a false retelling of history. He’s not the only strongman revising the past. By Katie Stallard About the author: Katie Stallard is a senior editor for China and global affairs at The New Statesman, and a non-resident global fellow at the Wilson Center in Washington, D.C. She is the author of Dancing on Bones: History and Power in China, Russia and North Korea. Sitting in the basement of a community center in the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk, listening to shells being dropped all around us, I watched as a young woman sought to explain the violence … Continue reading PUTIN ISN’T THE ONLY AUTOCRAT MISUSING HISTORY

How the image of a victimized Russia got into the country’s psyche

Is there victory in defeat? by Gregory Carleton The range of anti-Russian measures taken by countries around the world since the start of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is virtually unprecedented and hearkens back to the darkest days of the Cold War. They’ve assumed many forms but broadly include economic sanctions, military support for Ukraine and boycotts of Russian exports. Other forms of resistance, undertaken primarily by nonstate actors, focus more on Russian culture – its music, literature and arts – with the country’s conductors dismissed from European concert halls and pieces by Tchaikovsky excised from set lists. Yet there is no single country, … Continue reading How the image of a victimized Russia got into the country’s psyche

Tectonic shifts’: How Putin’s war will change the world

A former CIA leader imagines Russia, NATO and China in 2023 — and how the war in Ukraine will change them all. by John McLaughlin Making predictions just as the Ukraine war delivers a series of huge surprises feels like a fool’s errand. But let’s try to peer a bit through the fog of war. What got me thinking about this was the memory of a conversation with military historian Tom Ricks in the mountains of central Sicily a few years ago. We were there with Johns Hopkins University graduate students who were studying the 1943 Allied campaign against Germany. … Continue reading Tectonic shifts’: How Putin’s war will change the world

How Putin’s War Is Sinking Climate Science

I fled Russia as the war broke up the international collaboration key to climate research in the Arctic. BY ANDREA PITZER In the end, the war came three days early. It found me in Moscow, where I watched a Russian news anchor on state television call tanks crossing into Ukraine a “special operation.” A Russian friend watched with me. We sat without speaking, dull and blank as the snow outside. Soon after, another Russian friend came over, and we discussed whether the ticket I’d bought for the next day would get me out of the country soon enough, or whether … Continue reading How Putin’s War Is Sinking Climate Science

“The alarmists were right all along”: A Moscow journalist on Putin and the new Russian reality

An independent journalist describes what life is like inside Russia’s parallel universe. By Sean Illing Almost everyone outside Russia views Vladimir Putin’s decision to invade Ukraine the same way: as an obscene and unnecessary atrocity. But that’s because the outside world can see clearly what’s happening on the ground in Ukraine. For the average Russian, the picture looks very different. They know there’s something happening in Ukraine, but it’s not a “war” — it’s a “special military operation.” And if you watch the news, which is controlled by the state, you’re not seeing images of bombed apartment buildings or dead civilians on the streets, … Continue reading “The alarmists were right all along”: A Moscow journalist on Putin and the new Russian reality

THE RISE OF GLOBAL FASCISM AND THE END OF THE WORLD AS WE KNOW IT

John W. Whitehead & Nisha Whitehead, “This is the way the world ends. Not with a bang but a whimper.” ~“The Hollow Men,” T.S. Eliot Barely three years into the 2020s, and we seem to be living out the prophesies of the Book of Revelation with its dire warnings about plague, poverty, hatred and war. Just as the government hysteria over the COVID-19 pandemic appears to be dying down, new threats have arisen to occupy our attention and fuel our fears: food shortages, spiking inflation, rocketing gas prices, and a Ukraine-Russia conflict that threatens to bring about a world war. … Continue reading THE RISE OF GLOBAL FASCISM AND THE END OF THE WORLD AS WE KNOW IT

UKRAINE: a parallax view of Zelensky, Biden, NATO, Covid19, graphene debris and the New World Order

I sincerely hope that this seminal post will force a revision of how most observers view the recent history of Ukraine. Zelensky is not a hero, he’s a corrupt, nasty piece of work adopted by the usual suspects. Biden is not a democratic politician, he is a depraved old man with a greedy son. Putin is not a nice person, but he refuses to see his countrymen raped. EUNATO is an expansionist Empire with delusions of hegemony pushed from behind by the US Unelected State. Biolabs in Ukraine are inextricably linked to the origins of Covid19 and the contents of … Continue reading UKRAINE: a parallax view of Zelensky, Biden, NATO, Covid19, graphene debris and the New World Order

The Russian Elite Can’t Stand the Sanctions

The latest measures are far more effective than Western powers’ past efforts to target Russia’s elite. By Brooke Harrington About the author: Brooke Harrington is a sociology professor at Dartmouth College. She is the author of Pop Finance and Capital Without Borders: Wealth Management and the One Percent. Her site is brookeharrington.com. The United States, United Kingdom, and European Union had barely announced sanctions on overseas Russian wealth when the oligarchs began to whine and protest. That meant the policy—enacted after Russia invaded Ukraine—was working as intended, to punish Russia’s elites for supporting President Vladimir Putin. By last weekend in Moscow, the Russian-state-television host Vladimir Solovyev raged on camera over … Continue reading The Russian Elite Can’t Stand the Sanctions

Why Hasn’t the World Been Destroyed in a Nuclear War Yet?

This post is from the Nautilus archive. The precariousness of game theory. BY AMOS ZEEBERG When opposing nations gained access to nuclear weapons, it fundamentally changed the logic of war. You might say that it made questions about war more cleanly logical—with nuclear-armed belligerents, there are fewer classic military analyses about morale, materiel, and maneuverings. Hundreds of small-scale tactical decisions dissolve into a few hugely important large-scale strategic ones, like, What happens if one side drops a nuclear bomb on its nuclear-armed opponent? Using a dangerous weapon like a nuclear bomb can of course provoke dangerous responses. If one country crosses the … Continue reading Why Hasn’t the World Been Destroyed in a Nuclear War Yet?