THE PROBLEM WITH TELLING MEN WITH MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES TO ‘JUST REACH OUT’

by  Madeleine Holden When they do, there’s often no one there Samuel, a 27-year-old artist and gay man living in Australia, is telling me about his partner’s first and only experience seeking treatment for mental health issues. “Last year, he was in a really bad place and needed help,” he says. “He’s struggled with depression and anxiety his whole life, but small-town mentality has always told him to internalize.” Samuel explains that the Australian health-care system offers patients with a diagnosable mental illness six subsidized sessions with a psychologist, so he coaxed his partner into seeing a general practitioner for … Continue reading THE PROBLEM WITH TELLING MEN WITH MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES TO ‘JUST REACH OUT’

What Teachers Need To Know About The Science Of Learning–And What They Don’t

GETTY by Natalie WexlerSenior Contributor EducationI write about retooling K-12 education to address social inequality. Lately there’s been a push to acquaint educators with “the science of learning.” But only some aspects of that science actually help teachers do their jobs. Others just waste their time. You might think that before aspiring teachers take up their posts, they’re taught what scientists have discovered about how children learn. In fact, many teachers are unaware of that research, and—for complex reasons—some are actually hostile to scientific recommendations. Recent efforts to connect educators with these findings, including some by deans of education schools and by teachers themselves, are beginning to … Continue reading What Teachers Need To Know About The Science Of Learning–And What They Don’t

Researchers find how to add more “love hormone” to your relationships

A study looks at the chemistry of couples engaged in different activities. by Paul Ratner 14 February, 2019 Leisure activities can help release more oxytocin, say researchers. Oxytocin is a hormone linked to social and sexual interaction. Couples who took art classes and played board games together released oxytocin. With Valentine’s Day upon us, are you looking for a way to bring more love into your relationship? Take an art class or pick up a new board game to play together. This advice comes courtesy of a new study from Baylor University, which found that the bodies of couples engaged … Continue reading Researchers find how to add more “love hormone” to your relationships

HOW YOUR SUBCONSCIOUS IS THE KEY TO IMPROVING YOUR HEALTH AND CHANGING YOUR LIFE

by Dr. Mercola, Guest Waking Times In this interview, Mike Dow, Psy.D., and author of “Your Subconscious Brain Can Change Your Life: Overcome Obstacles, Heal Your Body, and Reach Any Goal with a Revolutionary Technique,” reveals how tapping into your subconscious through a modern form of hypnosis can help you heal mind, body and soul. “Most meditation is alpha. Hypnosis takes you into an even slower brain wave, into theta,” Dow says, who experienced his first hypnosis session as a “deep, wondrous trance, almost dream-like.” “I would say it felt magical, relaxing and wonderful. I sort of would have those twitches … Continue reading HOW YOUR SUBCONSCIOUS IS THE KEY TO IMPROVING YOUR HEALTH AND CHANGING YOUR LIFE

Did laughter make the mind?

A Jeep full of the Daughters of Charity in St Louis, Missouri in 1964. Photo by Bert Glinn/Magnum A psychological relief valve and a guard against despotism, laughter is a uniquely human – and collective – activity by Chris Knight is a British anthropologist. He is the author of Blood Relations: Menstruation and the Origins ofCulture (1991) and Decoding Chomsky: Science and Revolutionary Politics (2016). He lives in London. Edited by Sally Davies ‘All the acts of the drama of world history were performed before a chorus of the laughing people.’ From Rabelais and his World (1965) by Mikhail Bakhtin The central question that anthropologists ask can be stated … Continue reading Did laughter make the mind?

Should You Listen To Music While Doing Intellectual Work? It Depends On The Music, The Task, And Your Personality

People more prone to boredom performed better without background music By Christian Jarrett Given how many of us listen to music while studying or doing other cerebral work, you’d think psychology would have a set of clear answers as to whether the practice is likely to help or hinder performance. In fact, the research literature is rather a mess (not that that has deterred some enterprising individuals from making bold claims). There’s the largely discredited “Mozart Effect” – the idea that listening to classical music can boost subsequent IQ, except that when first documented in the 90s the effect was on spatial … Continue reading Should You Listen To Music While Doing Intellectual Work? It Depends On The Music, The Task, And Your Personality

It’s Not Bad Behavior: Recognizing Signs of Mental Illness in Children

An estimated 7.7 million children, roughly 16.5 percent nationwide, have at least one mental health disorder. Getty Images Mental health disorders are more common in young children than many people realize — and a number of them aren’t getting the help they need. Here’s how to spot the signs. Written by Leah Campbell Your 2 year old has been in full-blown tantrum mode for over an hour. Toys are being flung across the room, punches are flying any time you get near, and there’s even the risk of being bitten if you dare to get too close. Is this typical … Continue reading It’s Not Bad Behavior: Recognizing Signs of Mental Illness in Children