The Obliteration of Night: On the Consequences of Electric Light

BY Richard G ‘Bugs’ Stevens  LIGHT POLLUTION is often characterized as a soft issue in environmentalism. This perception needs to change. Light at night constitutes a massive assault on the ecology of the planet, including us. It also has indirect impacts because, while 20 percent of electricity is used for lighting worldwide, at least 30 percentof that light is wasted. Wasted light serves no purpose at all, and excessive lighting is too often used beyond what is needed for driving, or shopping, or Friday-night football. . It might be that virtually all aspects of health and wellbeing are dependent to one extent or another on a synchronized … Continue reading The Obliteration of Night: On the Consequences of Electric Light

Good Vibrations: A Buddhist Music Playlist

Photo by Mark Solarski | https://tricy.cl/2MlmE75 A collection of Buddhist-inspired songs from both traditional and unexpected sources to help you wake up or just chill out By Cara Dibdin Music has long served as a bridge between the ordinary and the divine. And while the early vinaya [monastic code] required monks and nuns to abstain from listening to or playing music, the Buddha’s teachers were preserved through chanting and oral recitation of the canonical texts. As Buddhism spread across the world, methods of transmission changed, as did the way music was used as a part of the tradition—as mantras, offerings, and … Continue reading Good Vibrations: A Buddhist Music Playlist

Elephants Have a Secret Weapon Against Cancer

Two baby elephants.RADU SIGHETI / REUTERS The biggest animals should have the highest risks of developing tumors, but they don’t. by ED YONG In 2012, on a whim, Vincent Lynch decided to search the genome of the African elephant to see if it had extra anti-cancer genes. Cancers happen when cells build up mutations in their DNA that allow them to grow and divide uncontrollably. Bigger animals, whose bodies comprise more cells, should therefore have a higher risk of cancer. This is true within species: On average, taller humans are more likely to develop tumors than shorter ones, and bigger … Continue reading Elephants Have a Secret Weapon Against Cancer

Chronic

Photo by Dhiraj Singh/Bloomberg via Getty For big pharma, the perfect patient is wealthy, permanently ill and a daily pill-popper. Will medicine ever recover? by Clayton Dalton is a medical resident at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. He attended medical school at Columbia University. Edited by Pam Weintraub Just a few years ago, infection with the hepatitis C virus guaranteed a slow and certain death for many. Available treatments were effective in about half of all patients, and the side effects could be awful. Things changed in 2014, when a new medication called Harvoni was approved to treat the infection. With … Continue reading Chronic

Read These Shocking 9 Ingredients In Coca-Cola And You Will Drink It No More…

What’s in this popular drink? By Dr. Betty Martini, D.Hum Exclusive To Rense The label of Coca Cola indicates that it contains sugar, phosphoric acid, caffeine, caramel, carbon dioxide and some “extract”. This extract and caused questions, writes DiasporaNews. The trial began, only then the Coca-Cola company was forced to disclose the secret, from what actually do the cola. This was a liquid obtained from an insect Cochineal (Cochineal). Cochineal is an insect from a group of herbaceous aphids that lives in the Canary Islands and in Mexico. It is sucked by the proboscis to the roots and stems of … Continue reading Read These Shocking 9 Ingredients In Coca-Cola And You Will Drink It No More…

Learning to Read the Brain’s Temporary Records

While molecular mind-reading remains the stuff of science fiction, our work brings us a step closer to filling the gap between experience and memory.  Kelsey Tyssowski THE FIRST DANCE at my wedding lasted exactly four minutes and 52 seconds, but I’ll probably remember it for decades. Neuroscientists still don’t entirely understand this: How was my brain able to translate this less-than-five-minute experience into a lifelong memory? Part of the puzzle is that there’s a gap between experience and memory: our experiences are fleeting, but it takes hours to form a long-term memory. In recent work published in the journal Neuron, my colleagues and I figured out how … Continue reading Learning to Read the Brain’s Temporary Records

Scientists Knew Blue Light From Screens Contributed to Blindness. Now They Know Why.

 skeeze/Emily Cho by Kristin Houser , Health & Medicine BAD, BAD BLUE LIGHT. When it comes to our eyesight, the various colors of light our eyes are subjected to are far from equal. Blue rays of light, which have shorter wavelengths and more energy than other colors, can damage our eyes over time – they contribute to macular degeneration, the primary cause of blindness. Now, thanks to a team of researchers from the University of Toledo, we know how blue light causes this damage, meaning we might also be on track to preventing it. They published their study Tuesday in the journal Scientific Reports. STEP AWAY FROM THE SCREEN. Sunlight contains all … Continue reading Scientists Knew Blue Light From Screens Contributed to Blindness. Now They Know Why.