The Secret to Happiness? Thinking About Death.

In an excerpt from his new book The Comfort Crisis, journalist Michael Easter travels to Bhutan to learn about how confronting death head-on can lead to a more fulfilled life by Michael Easter In his new book, The Comfort Crisis, Michael Easter investigates the connection between modern comforts and conveniences and some of our most pressing problems, like heart disease, diabetes, depression, and a sense of purposelessness. Turns out, engaging with a handful of evolutionary discomforts can dramatically improve our mental, physical, and spiritual wellbeing. One of those fruitful discomforts? Thinking about dying. Death has always been the most uncomfortable … Continue reading The Secret to Happiness? Thinking About Death.

An Anthropologist’s Case for Working Less and Relaxing More

by Editors Our work consumes us. But does it have to? Anthropologist James Suzman has spent decades living in the Kalahari Desert with one of the world’s last hunter-gatherer societies, and he’s concluded that our modern attitudes about work don’t mesh with the views held by our ancestors. For 95 percent of human history, we spent the bulk of our time doing… nothing. So what changed? Today on the Next Big Idea podcast, James sits down with Next Big Idea Club curator Adam Grant to advocate for spending less time toiling away at labor we loathe, and more time working at things we love. Listen to … Continue reading An Anthropologist’s Case for Working Less and Relaxing More

When the Line Between Life and Death Is ‘a Little Bit Fuzzy’

Every state recognizes brain death. But rules vary, and the true line separating life from death is ambiguous as ever. BY LOLA BUTCHER UNTIL SEPT. 17, 2020, Sharon Frederick was an ostensibly healthy 63-year-old woman who spent her days caring for her disabled sister and going to church. That evening, she was praying the rosary over the telephone with a friend when she began slurring her words. By the time an ambulance delivered her to St. Elizabeth Medical Center in Utica, New York, Frederick was comatose after suffering a massive stroke. Four days later, a physician declared her to be brain dead, … Continue reading When the Line Between Life and Death Is ‘a Little Bit Fuzzy’

Mind and God: The new science of neurotheology

Studies show that religion and spirituality are positively linked to good mental health. Our research aims to figure out how and why. by Andrew Newberg  Neurotheology is a field that unites brain science and psychology with religious belief and practices. There are several indirect and direct mechanisms that link spirituality with improved mental health. Compassion and love are positive emotions that will make your brain healthier. The field of neurotheology continues to expand from its early origins several decades ago to the present day. In its simplest definition, neurotheology refers to the field of scholarship that seeks to understand the relationship between … Continue reading Mind and God: The new science of neurotheology

How Your Body Remembers Trauma

KKGAS / STOCKSY UNITED Trauma can have damaging long-term effects, even on your physical health. Arm yourself with the science behind the sensations and therapies that can kickstart healing. BY MERYL DAVIDS LANDAU Amy Orr was watching TV one night some time ago when she felt a stabbing pain in her upper abdomen. Still hurting a few days later, she went to the emergency room, where doctors suspected gallstones. But tests were inconclusive, so they gave her pain meds and sent her home. The pain vanished that night, but it showed up again and again for months. She wound up at … Continue reading How Your Body Remembers Trauma

HOW TO BE LESS FULL OF SH!T

by Gary Z McGee, Self-inflicted Philosophy Waking Times “Someone once asked me, “What’s at the core of every human being? ‘Bullshit,’ I replied.” ~Gary John Bishop We are all full of shit to some degree or another. Knowing it sets us free. But why stop there? Sometimes, awareness isn’t enough. There must be action. Rather than wallow in the muck and mire of our bullshit, why not attempt to be become less full of shit? Rather than be driven by the bullshit of your past, why not allow yourself to be pulled up by the bullhorns of the future? You just need … Continue reading HOW TO BE LESS FULL OF SH!T

What Happens to Your Body When You Take a Cold Shower, Says Science

If you’re brave enough to try it, taking cold showers can change your life for the better. BY JOHN ANDERER FACT CHECKED BY WILLIAM MAYLE Given the choice, 99 out of 100 people would choose an inviting warm shower over an ice-cold one. But like in so many other areas of life, there’s something to be gained by jumping out of one’s comfort zone. The truth is, a cold shower can induce a number of changes and positive reactions in the human body that are beneficial across your physical, cognitive, and mental health. Now, I know what you’re thinking. “Water … Continue reading What Happens to Your Body When You Take a Cold Shower, Says Science

DOCUMENTARY EXPOSES THE ALARMING TRUTH – TV PUTS US IN HYPNOTIC STATE AND SUPPRESSES CRITICAL THINKING

by Phillip Schneider, Staff Writer Waking Times A documentary titled Pseudology: The Art of Lying tells what many of us already presumed. Watching television does put the viewer in a suggestible, almost hypnotic, state of mind and suppresses our ability to think critically. The documentary explains: “If you’ve ever experienced a mind fog after watching television, you’re not alone. The brain has four modes that it operates in, and four brain wave patterns. Delta is when you’re deep asleep, Theta is when you’re in light sleep, Alpha is awake but relaxed, it’s the mode of thinking that you are in when you’re in the most … Continue reading DOCUMENTARY EXPOSES THE ALARMING TRUTH – TV PUTS US IN HYPNOTIC STATE AND SUPPRESSES CRITICAL THINKING

The misinformation virus

Lies and distortions don’t just afflict the ignorant. The more you know, the more vulnerable you can be to infection by Elitsa Dermendzhiyska is a science writer and social entrepreneur working at the intersection of technology, research and mental health. She is the editor of the mental health anthology What Doesn’t Kill You: 15 Stories of Survival (2020). She lives in London. Edited by Marina Benjamin There’s a new virus in town and it’s not fooling around. You can catch it through face-to-face contact or digitally – that is, via a human or bot. Few of us possess immunity, some are even willing … Continue reading The misinformation virus

Perfectionistic cognitions appear to play a key role in clinical anxiety

by Beth Ellwood A new study found that perfectionist thinking patterns contributed to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) symptoms, over and above several known control variables. The findings were published in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy. Perfectionism involves a desire to perform to the highest standards without allowing room for failure. People with perfectionist beliefs tend to be overly self-critical and put pressure on themselves to perform flawlessly at all times. While perfectionism is often seen as a favorable trait, the attribute has been linked to numerous anxiety disorders such as obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and social anxiety disorder (SAD). … Continue reading Perfectionistic cognitions appear to play a key role in clinical anxiety