Absolutely, Indestructibly Happy

An interview with Tina Turner By Clark Strand Tina Turner is an American icon—a remarkably versatile creative artist whose career has spanned more than sixty years. The winner of eight Grammy Awards, Turner was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1991 and received a Kennedy Center Honor in 2005. But her path has not always been easy. Tina has overcome domestic abuse, discrimination, professional setbacks, life-threatening illness, and devastating personal loss. Throughout it all, she has credited her practice of Nichiren Buddhism as the source of her hope for a better world and her determination to overcome every obstacle in her life. … Continue reading Absolutely, Indestructibly Happy

The Therapeutic Power of Photography Transforms Pain into Beauty

By Miss Rosen  Without thinking we find ways to distance ourselves from the discomforts and indignities of life, denying the horrors that befall strangers, downplaying those may touch our lives, for trauma is one of the most difficult tragedies to manage and heal when it befalls our lives. Though it surrounds us in countless forms, we seek ways to buffer its relentless effect, trying to mediate the toll it takes on our physical, psychological, and spiritual state. Whether we keep ourselves disconnected and numb or become volatile and reactionary, the wound often goes untreated, festering and growing worse while the pain … Continue reading The Therapeutic Power of Photography Transforms Pain into Beauty

See America’s National Parks—Before They Were National Parks

Landscape photography like this helped create the National Park system. BY WINNIE LEE  In 1861, photographer Carleton E. Watkins lugged his custom-made oversized camera, designed to shoot on unusually large glass plate negatives, measuring 18 by 22 inches, to Yosemite in California. It was roughly 2,000 pounds of photography equipment that went with him, on the backs of mules, through the challenging terrain. His “mammoth” photos, using a difficult wet-collodion process, of such wonders as El Capitan, Mariposa Grove, and Cathedral Rocks, revealed an exquisite bit of Eden to viewers, especially those on the East Coast. “These earliest photographs of Yosemite resulted … Continue reading See America’s National Parks—Before They Were National Parks

The Synchronicity of Wolfgang Pauli and Carl Jung

How the theoretical physicist and analyst came together and then apart. BY PAUL HALPERN By the end of 1930, Austrian-born theoretical physicist Wolfgang Pauli was at the height of his achievements, yet an absolute emotional wreck. His brilliant contributions to science—such as the famous exclusion principle that would eventually earn him a Nobel Prize—had cemented his reputation as a genius. Remarkably, it demonstrated, among other consequences, why the electrons in an atom don’t all cluster together in the lowest energy quantum state and render it unstable. He had also predicted the existence of a lightweight, electrically neutral particle—later dubbed the … Continue reading The Synchronicity of Wolfgang Pauli and Carl Jung

People Are Dying After Joining a ‘Pro-Choice’ Suicide Forum. How Much Is the Site to Blame?

Loss survivors are demanding an end to the site, and provoking a conversation about how little we know about the internet and suicide risk. By Shayla Love Junior loved the weather: how to forecast rain or snow, the variations of atmospheric pressure, measuring wind, humidity, and temperature. He could watch the Weather Channel for hours. On a trip to New York with his mother Kelli Wilson in his early teens, they visited NBC Studios, where Junior stood in front of a green screen, where a meteorologist might stand, gesturing to a forthcoming or receding storm. The night before Junior died, on … Continue reading People Are Dying After Joining a ‘Pro-Choice’ Suicide Forum. How Much Is the Site to Blame?

Hope and religion in a time of crisis: evidence from Colombia and South Africa

Authors Victor CountedResearch Fellow, Western Sydney University Kenneth PargamentBowling Green State University Richard G. CowdenResearch Associate, Harvard University Disclosure statement The authors do not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and have disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment. Strict lock-down regulations, that have been implemented during the COVID-19, pandemic have broad implications for well-being. In many countries, businesses and other kinds of operations had to adjust or close. Unemployment rates rose and economic activity slowed dramatically. Alongside concerns about financial security, stay-at-home orders have disrupted daily routines … Continue reading Hope and religion in a time of crisis: evidence from Colombia and South Africa

Illuminated Figures Consider the Relationship Between the Body and Soul

“Vessel of the Universe (Sisidlan ng Kalawakan)” (2020), soldered metal, glass, LED strips, and electrical fittings, 64.5 x 47 x 12 inches. All images © Joshua Limon Palisoc, shared with permission by GRACE EBERT Joshua Limon Palisoc draws on the tenets of Filipino Psychology to inform his life-sized figures that radiate from the inside. Using mesh-like forms of soldered metal, the artist conveys the idea that the physical body is simply a vessel for the soul. LED lights nestled within the anatomical sculptures emit a warm glow through the seams, blurring the boundary between inner and outer selves. The illuminated forms shown here … Continue reading Illuminated Figures Consider the Relationship Between the Body and Soul

My sister, my mirror

Vanessa and Virginia – intimates in art, adversaries in love. Can we ever transcend the primal envy of the sisterly bond? Lily Dunn is a British writer of fiction and nonfiction. She is the author of the novel Shadowing the Sun (2008), and her essays have appeared in Granta. Her next book is ‘A Wild and Precious Life: A Recovery Anthology’, co-edited with Zoe Gilbert (forthcoming, 2020). She lives in the UK. Edited by Marina Benjamin Before me are two portraits of famous sisters as children. They have that fixed quality of 19th-century photography. In one, a girl, sullen and serious, challenges the camera with passive … Continue reading My sister, my mirror

BEWARE THE DARK TRIAD: 15 SIGNS THERE’S A PSYCHOPATH IN YOUR OFFICE

“Don’t just let it slip.” by ALI PATTILLO TO DATE, researchers in organizational psychology have primarily focused on the role of leaders in promoting or preventing success. There is a lot of research on bad bosses. But what about bad employees? In a 2019 study, published in the journal Academy of Management, scientists asked that very question: What if employees are guided by the wrong values, lack a moral compass and compassion for others, and use their positions to pursue their own goals? The research highlights the power of individual “bad actors” at work, whose behavior can toxify a company. The study also reveals how one … Continue reading BEWARE THE DARK TRIAD: 15 SIGNS THERE’S A PSYCHOPATH IN YOUR OFFICE

What We Can Learn About Nazi Psychology From the Wives of Hitler’s Top Officials

Adolf Hitler (1889 – 1945) with guests at at his residence on Dec. 31, 1939. Gerda Bormann is in the back row, fourth from left. Getty ImagesBY JAMES WYLLIE NOVEMBER 12, 2020 10:00 AM EST BY JAMES WYLLIE Among the thousands of books about Nazism, barely a handful focus on the wives of the leading figures in Hitler’s regime. While their men have left an indelible imprint on our collective memory the women who gave them vital support, encouragement and direction have largely remained relegated to the footnotes of history. Part of the reason for this is the nature of the source material, much of which … Continue reading What We Can Learn About Nazi Psychology From the Wives of Hitler’s Top Officials