We’re More of Ourselves When We’re in Tune with Others

Music reminds us why going solo goes against our better nature. BY KEVIN BERGER When musicians have chemistry, we can feel it. There’s something special among them that’s missing when they perform alone. Anyone who’s heard a Mick Jagger solo album knows that’s the case. Clearly nature wants us to jam together and take flight out of our individual selves. The reward is transcendence, our bodies tell us so. What’s the secret of that chemistry? It’s a question that one of the most refreshing neuroscientists who studies music has been probing lately. Refreshing because her lab is not only in … Continue reading We’re More of Ourselves When We’re in Tune with Others

Vast early America

There is no American history without the histories of Indigenous and enslaved peoples. And this past has consequences today Karin Wulf is executive director of the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and professor of history at William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. Edited bySam Haselby Nations need history; it is a key genre for explaining the status quo. Modern nations and modern historical practices in the West developed over the same centuries, so the effort to harness the latter to the former is no surprise. Yet whether about the removal of statues, the veracity of journalism and … Continue reading Vast early America

Stop Calling Them “Girls’ Bikes“

A case for pedaling a step-through bike by Eben Weiss Like a dog’s tail communicates its mood, a bike’s top tube indicates its intent. A level top tube implies a bicycle of classical proportions and dignified comportment. A sloping one suggests light weight and snappy acceleration. And a top tube low enough to easily lift your foot over in order to mount the bicycle means it’s a “girl’s” bike, and not one meant to be ridden hard by serious riders. Yeah, right. While the purpose of the step-through frame was originally to accommodate a woman’s wardrobe (women in pants was a radical … Continue reading Stop Calling Them “Girls’ Bikes“

The Antidote to the Irreversibility of Life: Hannah Arendt on What Forgiveness Really Means

“Forgiving… is the only reaction which does not merely re-act but acts anew and unexpectedly, unconditioned by the act which provoked it and therefore freeing from its consequences both the one who forgives and the one who is forgiven.” BY MARIA POPOVA “To forgive is to assume a larger identity than the person who was first hurt,” poet and philosopher David Whyte observed as he dove for the deeper meanings of our commonest concepts. But, as James Baldwin and Margaret Mead demonstrated in their historic conversation about forgiveness and the crucial difference between guilt and responsibility, Western culture has a confused understanding … Continue reading The Antidote to the Irreversibility of Life: Hannah Arendt on What Forgiveness Really Means

A just and loving gaze

Simone Weil: mystic, philosopher, activist. Her ethics demand that we look beyond the personal and find the universal Deborah Casewell is a Humboldt Research Fellow in philosophy at the University of Bonn and co-director of the UK-based Simone Weil Network. Her most recent book is Eberhard Jüngel and Existence: Being Before the Cross (2021). Edited byNigel Warburton The short life of Simone Weil, the French philosopher, Christian mystic and political activist, was one of unrelenting self-sacrifice from her childhood to her death. At a very young age, she expressed an aversion to luxury. In an action that prefigured her death, while still … Continue reading A just and loving gaze

Spectacular Drone Views Of Giza Present the Pyramid in an Unusual Perspective

All photos © Alexander Ladanivskyy, shared with permission By CHRISTOPHER JOBSON Ukrainian photographer Alexander Ladanivskyy travels the world in search of spectacular images including idyllic scenes of Icelandic waterfalls, ancient mountain cities in Jordan, and the collision of history and modernity in Nepal. Last April, he teamed up with the Ministry of Tourism in Egypt to shoot one of the most photographed landmarks on Earth: the Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt. Not satisfied with recreating perspectives found on postcards and Instagram feeds, Ladanivskyy instead used a drone to shoot the 4,600-year-old structure squarely from above at different altitudes. The series offers … Continue reading Spectacular Drone Views Of Giza Present the Pyramid in an Unusual Perspective

Lies and honest mistakes

Richard V Reeves is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, where he directs the Future of the Middle Class Initiative and co-directs the Center on Children and Families. His writing has appeared in The Atlantic, National Affairs, and The New York Times, among others. His latest book is Dream Hoarders (2017). He lives in Washington, DC. Edited byNigel Warburton The other day, I told a friend that Knoxville is the capital of Tennessee. Five seconds and a blur of fingers later, he said: ‘No, it’s Nashville.’ My statement was obviously not true. But since I sincerely believed in the accuracy of what I was … Continue reading Lies and honest mistakes

Meet Mary Pearcey, The 19th-Century Murderess Who May Have Actually Been ‘Jack The Ripper’

Public Domain/RedditMurderess Mary Pearcey was one of the only female suspects considered by London police to be the notorious “Jack the Ripper” serial killer. By Genevieve Carlton | Checked By Leah Silverman Two years after Jack the Ripper murdered and mutilated five women in London, Mary Pearcey was found guilty of an eerily similar slaying. In 1888, the streets of London’s East End were stalked by a grisly killer known only as “Jack the Ripper.” Though that murderer was never caught, over 100 suspects were identified — including a murderess named Mary Pearcey. Indeed, some historians have long suspected that the vicious butcher might have been … Continue reading Meet Mary Pearcey, The 19th-Century Murderess Who May Have Actually Been ‘Jack The Ripper’

BUBBLES OF HATE: HOW SOCIAL MEDIA KEEPS USERS ADDICTED, ALONE, & ILL-INFORMED

by Dr. Tim Coles, New Dawn Waking Times Internet communication has gone from emails, messaging boards, and chatrooms, to sophisticated, all-pervasive networking. Social media companies build addictiveness into their products. The longer you spend on their sites and apps, the more data they generate. The more data, the more accurately they anticipate what you’ll do next and for how long. The better their predictions, the more money they make by selling your attention to advertisers. Depressed and insecure about their value as human beings, the younger generations grow up knowing only digital imprisonment. Older users are trapped in polarised bubbles of … Continue reading BUBBLES OF HATE: HOW SOCIAL MEDIA KEEPS USERS ADDICTED, ALONE, & ILL-INFORMED

Collective narcissism can warp your moral judgments, according to new psychology research

by Eric W. Dolan A large body of research indicates that egocentrism shapes moral judgments. Now, new research indicates that people not only prefer moral decision that benefit them, some people — particularly those high collective narcissism — also display a bias towards moral decision that benefit their group. The new findings appear in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. “In the past, we found evidence that people judge unethical actions of other people less harsh when they benefit from them. Thus, we wanted to investigate if the same kind of self-interest bias would be observed on the group level when in-group members … Continue reading Collective narcissism can warp your moral judgments, according to new psychology research