SEX ROBOTS – THE EVOLUTION OF THE OBJECTIFICATION OF WOMEN

by Christina SarichStaff Writer Waking Times

With pedophilia rings being busted almost weekly now, and the gender-bending meme playing out all over Hollywood, never mind its being insinuated into our biology chemically, without our choice — there seems to be a new-fangled perversion which we are supposed to accept as “normal.” Never-mind its psychological and social implications. The introduction of robots as sex toys – that you can rape, masturbate to, or simply voice your most outlandish fantasy to – is being inserted into our psyche via a slow drip, but make no mistake, the intention is to open a deluge so that non-human sexual “play” is commonplace.

On a recent trip to the near-Silicon-Valley-area of California, I was awe-struck at the promotion of the technocratic singularity – a time in which AI intelligence would surpass our own and we would all bow down as AI slaves to a “greater” intelligence.  As unwitting, dumbed down humans we are meant to absorb this advanced technology into our lives without questioning its motivations.

“Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” – Arthur C. Clarke

Children were encouraged to play with robots as “pals” at a science museum in San Diego, and robots were at the airport in Santa Ana, within a toddler-safe den of toy blocks. The robot was accompanied by a woman with sparkly glitter on her cheekbones who handed out robot stickers and encouraged children to play with the robot instead of each other. This de-humanization of our species takes an even more sinister twist, however, when you consider the sterilization attempts of the larger powers in play, and the concerted effort to bring AI into our lives at every turn – including into our sexuality.

In a society that has already objectified the human being to such a degree that women are told they “deserved it” when they are raped, for dressing provocatively, or even wearing red lipstick, and “sexting” among teens now includes describing forceful and violent acts of fisting, while young boys are silenced in Vatican torture chambers and used as sexual mannequins by the elite, we now have the bizarre creation of Samantha. She’s an AI robot who “really likes to be kissed” at least according to her maker, Sergi Santos.

 

The Samantha Sex Doll

She also sits passively to be “used” whenever her owner feels sexually aroused, with no need for said person to learn social graces, or the emotional maturity and sensitivity that would allow a sexual interaction with a real woman. Surely, he won’t have to stimulate her clitoris to bring her to climax, as his only goal is his own sexual fulfillment. And certainly he won’t have to take her to dinner or act attentive when she expresses real emotion.

You can also buy a sex-robot on sale in Britain’s Covent Gardens. There are “try-before-you-buy” models being paraded like used cars ready for a test drive.

Or how about this creepy sex-bot that can talk dirty to you in bed? If that level of odd perversion isn’t enough, the most recent model is called the Real Doll. She’s being promoted as “better than a woman.” As Engadget describes how the Real Doll works with other AI technologies,

“Harmony AI is part Android app, part sexualized personal assistant available for download directly from RealBotix. Imagine something between a horny Her and Siri for phone sex. For $20 a year, users can create a limited number of personalized avatars with customizable voices, moods and personality traits. Like Scarlett Johansson’s Samantha in Her, McMullen sees Harmony as a sort of girlfriend in your smartphone; a companion to keep you company throughout the day.”

Put succinctly, if you don’t like your girlfriend’s personality – you can just change it with your smartphone app. That’s not setting a dangerous precedent at all.

But Samantha, and the Real Doll aren’t one of a kind novelties. Robot doll brothels already operate in South Korea, Japan and Spain, while the first robotic oral sex coffee shop opened in Paddington, west London, just last year.

Cyborg sex is an emotionless, guilt-free, abuse-promoting pathway to completely submissive sex on demand. Even Noel Sharkey, Professor Emeritus of Robotics and Artificial Intelligence at the University of Sheffield , and the co-founder of the FRR said that the government needs to regulate the use of cyborgs (pleasure-bots) for sex…

more…

About the Author

Christina Sarich is a staff writer for Waking Times. She is a writer, musician, yogi, and humanitarian with an expansive repertoire. Her thousands of articles can be found all over the Internet,..

This article (Sex Robots – The Evolution of the Objectification of Women) was originally created and published by Waking Times and is published here under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Christina Sarich and WakingTimes.com. It may be re-posted freely with proper attribution and author bio.

http://www.wakingtimes.com/2017/08/15/sex-robots-evolution-objectification-women/

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How Information Got Re-Invented

Claude Shannon – ILLUSTRATION BY JESSICA LIN

The story behind the birth of the information age.

With his marriage to Norma Levor over, Claude Shannon was a bachelor again, with no attachments, a small Greenwich Village apartment, and a demanding job. His evenings were mostly his own, and if there’s a moment in Shannon’s life when he was at his most freewheeling, this was it. He kept odd hours, played music too loud, and relished the New York jazz scene. He went out late for raucous dinners and dropped by the chess clubs in Washington Square Park. He rode the A train up to Harlem to dance the jitterbug and take in shows at the Apollo. He went swimming at a pool in the Village and played tennis at the courts along the Hudson River’s edge. Once, he tripped over the tennis net, fell hard, and had to be stitched up.

His home, on the third floor of 51 West Eleventh Street, was a small New York studio. “There was a bedroom on the way to the bathroom. It was old. It was a boardinghouse … it was quite romantic,” recalled Maria Moulton, the downstairs neighbor. Perhaps somewhat predictably, Shannon’s space was a mess: dusty, disorganized, with the guts of a large music player he had taken apart strewn about on the center table. “In the winter it was cold, so he took an old piano he had and chopped it up and put it in the fireplace to get some heat.” His fridge was mostly empty, his record player and clarinet among the only prized possessions in the otherwise spartan space. Claude’s apartment faced the street. The same apartment building housed Claude Levi-Strauss, the great anthropologist. Later, Levi-Strauss would find that his work was influenced by the work of his former neighbor, though the two rarely interacted while under the same roof.

Though the building’s live-in super and housekeeper, Freddy, thought Shannon morose and a bit of a loner, Shannon did befriend and date his neighbor Maria. They met when the high volume of his music finally forced her to knock on his door; a friendship, and a romantic relationship, blossomed from her complaint.

Maria encouraged him to dress up and hit the town. “Now this is good!” he would exclaim when a familiar tune hit the radio on their drives. He read to her from James Joyce and T.S. Eliot, the latter his favorite author. He was, she remembered, preoccupied with the math problems he worked over in the evenings, and he was prone to writing down stray equations on napkins at restaurants in the middle of meals. He had few strong opinions about the war or politics, but many about this or that jazz musician. “He would find these common denominators between the musicians he liked and the ones I liked,” she remembered. He had become interested in William Sheldon’s theories about body types and their accompanying personalities, and he looked to Sheldon to understand his own rail-thin (in Sheldon’s term, ectomorphic) frame.

A few Bell Labs colleagues became Shannon’s closest friends. One was Barney Oliver. Tall, with an easy smile and manner, he enjoyed scotch and storytelling. Oliver’s easygoing nature concealed an intense intellect: “Barney was an intellect in the genius range, with a purported IQ of 180,” recalled one colleague. His interests spanned heaven and earth—literally. In time, he would become one of the leaders of the movement in the search for extraterrestrial life. Oliver also held the distinction of being one of the few to hear about Shannon’s ideas before they ever saw the light of day. As he proudly recalled later, “We became friends and so I was the mid-wife for a lot of his theories. He would bounce them off me, you know, and so I understood information theory before it was ever published.” That might have been a mild boast on Oliver’s part, but given the few people Shannon let into even the periphery of his thinking, it was notable that Shannon talked with him about work at all.

The answer to noise is not in how loudly we speak, but in how we say what we say.

John Pierce was another of the Bell Labs friends whose company Shannon shared in the off hours. At the Labs, Pierce “had developed a wide circle of devoted admirers, charmed by his wit and his lively mind.” He was Shannon’s mirror image in his thin figure and height—and in his tendency to become quickly bored of anything that didn’t intensely hold his interest. This extended to people. “It was quite common for Pierce to suddenly enter or leave a conversation or a meal halfway through,” wrote Jon Gertner.

Shannon and Pierce were intellectual sparring partners in the way only two intellects of their kind could be. They traded ideas, wrote papers together, and shared countless books over the course of their tenures at Bell Labs. Pierce told Shannon on numerous occasions that “he should write up this or that idea.” To which Shannon is said to have replied, with characteristic insouciance, “What does ‘should’ mean?”…

more…

http://nautil.us/issue/51/limits/how-information-got-re_invented

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SOCIAL ENGINEERING VIA MEDIA 101 – HOW TO NORMALIZE THE ABSURD

by Sigmund FraudStaff Writer Waking Times

Ever pay attention to trends in the media? Some stories and narratives rise and fall in cycles, along with your awareness of them. It’s kind of like a shell game, where the street hustler directs your attention to one shell as a distraction while he shuffles aside the nut with the goods in it. A ‘now you see it, now you don’t,’ kind of thing.

When you see the same story arise frequently in the mainstream media, you can bet that it’s something you’re supposed to be looking at.

You see, the major corporate media operates from talking points and top-down directives. A mere 6 corporations owns some 90% of all the major media outlets, and as corporations do, they rule by memos from up high.

Tonight show host Conan O’Brien knows this, and he rips on the media for the insane homogenization of local news. He does this bit where his team edits together actual footage of local newscasters from around the country saying the exact same thing, word for word, but, each anchor-person personalizes it with their own inflection, pausing, intonation and so on. It’s hilarious, but at the same time disturbing because it shockingly demonstrates how ideas are forced into the mainstream of today’s corporate culture.

Have a look. This always cracks me up. Not in a ‘ha ha’ sort of way, though, more like in a ‘ha ha, aren’t we gullible,’ kind of way. Big difference.

The point is, when you see a story being played over and again on various news outlets, you have good reason to believe that the information isn’t coming to you organically. It’s not something you really need to know or something that is genuinely relevant to day-to-day life in your community. It’s the execution of an agenda. The information is being deliberately disseminated to manufacture awareness and recalibrate the standard for normal. It’s something the corporate media wants you to focus on. Like in the shell game.

When you understand this fundamental of corporate media, the landscape of information today looks totally different. You’re able to see narratives unfold and evolve, and able to recognize when your attention is deliberately being drawn towards an issue. Or away from an issue.

Here’s a few examples from the present that when taken as everyday happenstance may seem benign, but have serious implications for the future of society and for the human race at large. The fact that these issues are being presented with noticeable frequency these days is a red flag that there is some larger agenda in the works. The norms, values and standards in our culture are being tweaked, or twerked, and attacked by the repetition of such information.

Vaccines – This is perhaps one of the most common issues thrust on the public in order to fabricate widespread public support for a questionable and very profitable practice. The one-sidedness of the debate on this sensitive issued has successfully created a society where people now openly demand forced medical procedures on others to alleviate a perceived fear.

Gender Neutrality – This is the idea that a person’s biological gender is somehow fluid against their opinion of themselves. There is an apparent effort to make us believe that those with confusion over their gender are horribly oppressed and in danger, and that they need to be protected with censorship and speech laws. The aim here is to promote the virtues of censorship, and to develop a generation of people who don’t value procreation and the advancement of the human race, but rather shallow social issues and a perceived sense of justice.

Sex Robots – Robot sex toys are increasingly being put in front of the public and lauded as the future of companionship. News stories on the latest advancements in robot sex dolls are ubiquitous these days. We are being told they make great life partners and that they sufficiently synthesize the experience of being with a real woman (or man). The end game here is to further disconnect people from each other, and perhaps also to assist in a broader depopulation agenda by persuading us that sex with plastic and electronics is as good as or better than the real thing. Look for birth rates to decline further as these creepy sex toys become more popular.

Microchipping – Some call this the ‘mark of the beast,’ but the idea of microchipping people for their supposed convenience is being pushed out onto all the major media channels as a great way to take part in our technological future. Issues of privacy, tyranny, and the abuse of power are hardly examined. Feature stories on acquiescent corporate employees who willingly take the chip make it seem as though chipping is fashionable.

These are just a few examples, but the technique in play here is a fundamental method of social engineering via media…

more…

About the Author
Sigmund Fraud is a survivor of modern psychiatry and a dedicated mental activist. He is a staff writer for WakingTimes.com where he indulges in the possibility of a massive shift towards a more psychologically aware future for humankind.
This article (Social Engineering Via Media 101 – How to Normalize the Absurd) was originally created and published by Waking Times and is published here under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Sigmund Fraud and WakingTimes.com. It may be re-posted freely with proper attribution, author bio, and this copyright statement.

http://www.wakingtimes.com/2017/08/11/social-engineering-via-media-101-normalize-absurd/

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What It’s Like to Be a Private Investigator in the Internet Age

Today, the 1940s Hollywood version of the fedora-wearing, cigarette-smoking, down-on-his-luck private dick chasing down a femme fatale has gone the way of Blockbuster and other old-timey industries and professions. Same for the investigative work of Sherlock Holmesthe Hardy Boys and Magnum P.I. In fact, the lone-wolf private eye has more or less been replaced by corporate investigation services that are mostly concerned with running employee background checks.

Nonetheless, people still cheat; people still fall off the grid; and people still want to find the one that got away. That’s typically when Jay Rosenzweig’s phone rings. A private investigator since 1982, JR (as he goes by) has seen the business change thanks to Google, Facebook and all the other ways private information goes public these days. But he also knows that sometimes even the most thorough internet search still can’t beat good ol’ gumshoe.

There was a time in the 1980s when I had no choice but to follow a person from their office to a sketchy motel to find out if they were cheating on their spouse. Nowadays, I just use my computer to do practically the same thing. I create a fake profile, pose as a potential match and carry on a short dialogue.

Jay Rosenzweig, PI

 

For example, the other day, a woman asked me to find out if her daughter’s boyfriend had a criminal record. I sifted through a bunch of digital court records to find all the things he was charged with, when he was charged and what the sentence was. In all, this guy had close to 50 felonies in 10 different counties and 10 different states. In the old days, it would’ve taken a team of investigators weeks to travel to all these jurisdictions and mine through police reports. It took me a day doing it by computer.

The other thing that’s changed these days are all the new laws that favor consumers, employees and tenants. In 1998, The California legislature passed a Penal Code statute that governs GPS tracking. The statute, Cal. Penal Code § 637.7, makes it illegal to use an electronic tracking device to determine the location or movement of a person. Before that, you could put a tracking device on anyone’s car. Nowadays, you can only put a tracking device on a car that’s under your name. If a client’s ex-wife is driving his car, we can put a tracking device on that car at the request of my client, but if it’s not under his name, we can’t.

The problem with with all of this — the new laws and the dawn of the internet — is that it’s made a lot of private investigators lazy. In fact, it’s gotten to the point where many P.I.s won’t even leave their offices.

But here’s why they should, and why the internet by itself can’t do their jobs for them: In the early 1990s, one of my cases involved a client who was worried that his father — a wealthy older man in his 70s who had suddenly left his family to move to Vegas with a woman 30 years younger than him — was being taken advantage of. My job was to go there and do some surveillance. I brought my wife with me, who also had her P.I. license, but was a practicing attorney.

After about an hour of sitting in our car outside the man’s house, my wife looks at me and says, “I’m going in.” An hour later she comes back out and tells me, “You’re never going to believe what I found out…” Under the ruse that she was looking to move into the neighborhood, she discovered that both the man and woman were HIV positive and living together as part of a support group. The man was too afraid to tell his kids the truth. Also, the woman was married. Her husband was working in Reno to pay her medical bills.

No amount of online investigation would have ever uncovered this. But just a few hours in the field did.

I’ll give you another good example of where fieldwork can’t be replicated with a machine: In 2007, I was hired by a couple who wanted to locate their bipolar son who had disappeared and moved to L.A. All they wanted me to do was to deliver a backpack to him with some of his belongings. They also wanted to make sure he was still alive.

I started my search in Santa Monica and Venice. After a week of going to every homeless shelter and soup kitchen in the area, I paid a homeless guy $20 who told me to stand where I was standing for the next 20 minutes and that the person I was looking for would walk by me. I thought I was going to get jumped, but 20 minutes later, the guy walked right by me. I handed him the backpack and took a picture of him to prove to his parents that I’d found him. Two years later, they asked me to find him again, and within in an hour, I found him at the Santa Monica Library because one of the few things he told me when I found him the first time was that he liked to read.

Like I said, I don’t do as much fieldwork as I used to, but every now and again, I’ll have to knock on a few doors, stake out a Starbucks and/or interrogate a barista in order to put together a timeline to locate a missing person.

It’s certainly not a Hollywood detective movie from the 1940s, but it’s still a game of hide-and-seek.

As told to Andrew Fiouzi

https://melmagazine.com/what-its-like-to-be-a-private-investigator-in-the-internet-age-2f8a6e5e65ab

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Google: Search Engine or Deep State Organ?

by Michael Krieger

Today’s post should be read as Part 3 of my ongoing series about the now infamous Google memo, and what it tells us about where our society is headed if a minority of extremely wealthy and powerful technocratic billionaires are permitted to fully socially engineer our culture to fit their ideological vision using coercion, force and manipulation. For some context, read Part 1 and Part 2.

I struggled with the title of this piece, because ever since the 2016 election, usage of the term “deep state” has become overly associated with Trump cheerleaders. I’m not referring to people who voted for Trump, whom I can both understand and respect, I’m talking about the Trump cultists. Like most people who mindlessly and enthusiastically attach themselves to political figures, they tend to be either morons or opportunists.

Nevertheless, just because the term has been somewhat tainted doesn’t mean I deny the existence of a “deep state” or “shadow government.” The existence of networks of unelected powerful people who formulate and push policy behind the scenes and then get captured members of Congress to vote on it is pretty much undeniable. I don’t believe that the “deep state” is a monolithic entity by any means, but what seems to unite these various people and institutions is an almost religious belief in U.S. imperial dominance, as well as the idea that this empire should be largely governed by an unaccountable oligarchy of billionaires and assorted technocrats. We see the results of this worldview all around us with endless wars, an unconstitutional domestic surveillance state and the destruction of the middle class. These are the fruits of deep state ideology, and a clear reason why it should be dismantled and replaced by genuine governance by the people before they lead the U.S. to total disaster.

From my own personal research and observations, Google has become very much a willing part of this deep state, with Eric Schmidt being the primary driving force that has propelled the company into its contemporary role not just as a search engine monopoly, but also as a powerful and undemocratic tech arm of the shadow government.

One of the best things about all the recent attention on the Google memo, is that it has placed this corporate behemoth and its very clear ideological leanings squarely in the public eye. This gives us the space to shine light on some other aspects of Google, which I believe most people would find quite concerning if made aware of.

To that end, in 2014, Wikileaks published an extremely powerful excerpt from Julian Assange’s book, When Google Met Wikileaks. The post was titled, Google Is Not What It Seems, and it is an incredible repository of information and insight. If you never read it, I suggest you take the time. Below I share some choice excerpts to get you up to speed with what Google is really up to.

Let’s start with the intro to the piece, which sets the stage…

Eric Schmidt is an influential figure, even among the parade of powerful characters with whom I have had to cross paths since I founded WikiLeaks. In mid-May 2011 I was under house arrest in rural Norfolk, about three hours’ drive northeast of London. The crackdown against our work was in full swing and every wasted moment seemed like an eternity. It was hard to get my attention. But when my colleague Joseph Farrell told me the executive chairman of Google wanted to make an appointment with me, I was listening.

In some ways the higher echelons of Google seemed more distant and obscure to me than the halls of Washington. We had been locking horns with senior US officials for years by that point. The mystique had worn off. But the power centers growing up in Silicon Valley were still opaque and I was suddenly conscious of an opportunity to understand and influence what was becoming the most influential company on earth. Schmidt had taken over as CEO of Google in 2001 and built it into an empire.1

I was intrigued that the mountain would come to Muhammad. But it was not until well after Schmidt and his companions had been and gone that I came to understand who had really visited me…

more…

https://libertyblitzkrieg.com/2017/08/09/google-search-engine-or-arm-of-the-deep-state/

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Claude Shannon, the Las Vegas Shark

The father of information theory built a machine to game roulette, then abandoned it.

Many of Claude Shannon’s off-the-clock creations were whimsical—a machine that made sarcastic remarks, for instance, or the Roman numeral calculator. Others created by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and father of information theory showed a flair for the dramatic and dazzling: the trumpet that spit flames or the machine that solved Rubik’s cubes. Still other devices he built anticipated real technological innovations by more than a generation. One in particular stands out, not just because it was so far ahead of its time, but because of just how close it came to landing Shannon in trouble with the law—and the mob.

Long before the Apple Watch or the Fitbit, what was arguably the world’s first wearable computer was conceived by Ed Thorp, then a little-known graduate student in physics at the University of California, Los Angeles. Thorp was the rare physicist who felt at home with both Vegas bookies and bookish professors. He loved math, gambling, and the stock market, roughly in that order. The tables and the market he loved for the challenge: Could you create predictability out of seeming randomness? What could give one person an edge in games of chance? Thorp wasn’t content just pondering these questions; like Shannon, he set out to find and build answers.

In 1960, Thorp was a junior professor at MIT. He had been working on a theory for playing blackjack, the results of which he hoped to publish in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Shannon was the only academy member in MIT’s mathematics department, so Thorp sought him out. “The secretary warned me that Shannon was only going to be in for a few minutes, not to expect more, and that he didn’t spend time on subjects (or people) that didn’t interest him. Feeling awed and lucky, I arrived at Shannon’s office to find a thinnish, alert man of middle height and build, somewhat sharp featured,” Thorp recalled.

Thorp had piqued Shannon’s interest with the blackjack paper, to which Shannon recommended only a change of title, from “A Winning Strategy for Blackjack” to the more mundane “A Favorable Strategy for Twenty-One,” the better to win over the academy’s staid reviewers. The two shared a love of putting math in unfamiliar territory in search of chance insights. After Shannon “cross-examined” Thorp about his blackjack paper, he asked, “Are you working on anything else in the gambling area?”

Thorp confessed. “I decided to spill my other big secret and told him about roulette. Ideas about the project flew between us. Several exciting hours later, as the wintery sky turned dusky, we finally broke off with plans to meet again on roulette.” As one writer, William Poundstone, put it, “Thorp had inadvertently set one of the century’s great minds on yet another tangent.”

Thorp was immediately invited to Shannon’s house. The basement, Thorp remembered, was “a gadgeteer’s paradise. … There were hundreds of mechanical and electrical categories, such as motors, transistors, switches, pulleys, gears, condensers, transformers, and on and on.” Thorp was in awe: “Now I had met the ultimate gadgeteer.”

What impressed him more than any of the gadgets was his host’s uncanny ability to “see” a solution to a problem rather than to muscle it out with unending work.

It was in this tinkerer’s laboratory that they set out to understand how roulette could be gamed, ordering “a regulation roulette wheel from Reno for $1,500,” a strobe light, and a clock whose hand revolved once per second. Thorp was given inside access to Shannon in all his tinkering glory:

Gadgets … were everywhere. He had a mechanical coin tosser which could be set to flip the coin through a set number of revolutions, producing a head or tail according to the setting. As a joke, he built a mechanical finger in the kitchen which was connected to the basement lab. A pull on the cable curled the finger in a summons. Claude also had a swing about 35 feet long attached to a huge tree, on a slope. We started the swing from uphill and the downhill end of the arc could be as much as 15 or 20 feet above the ground. … Claude’s neighbors on the Mystic lake were occasionally astounded to see a figure “walking on the water.” It was me using a pair of Claude’s huge styrofoam “shoes” designed just for this.

And yet, Thorp wrote, what impressed him more than any of the gadgets was his host’s uncanny ability to “see” a solution to a problem rather than to muscle it out with unending work. “Shannon seemed to think with ‘ideas’ more than with words or formulas. A new problem was like a sculptor’s block of stone and Shannon’s ideas chiseled away the obstacles until an approximate solution emerged like an image, which he proceeded to refine as desired with more ideas.”…

more…

http://nautil.us/issue/50/emergence/claude-shannon-the-las-vegas-cheat

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The Men Committed to Replacing Women With A.I. Sex Dolls

If RealDolls aren’t woman enough yet, they will be soon

by C. Brian Smith

Recently, a guy who goes by the screen-name numbCruncher posted something he called “Real Doll Economics” to the MGTOW forums — “MGTOW” standing for Men Going Their Own Way, and consisting of an online community of heterosexual males who’ve chosen a lifestyle that avoids legal and romantic entanglements with women at all costs. In it, numbCruncher argued that one way in which to Go His Own Way was to replace women with sex dolls and robots such as the life-like(ish) RealDoll. He began by crunching some numbs [sic throughout]:

The average cost of a marriage in the US is 26,444 dollars. The average cost of a divorce in the US ranges from 15,000–20,000. Add up miscellaneous expenses and a conservative estimate of a failed marriage begins at 50,000 dollars. [RealDoll CEO] Matt McMullen produces incredibly lifelike dolls from 5,000 to 7,000 dollars that are waaaay hotter than anything you’ll get from “real” women for that price. The doll will never get old and saggy. She’ll never bitch about you to her friends. She’ll never trick you into having kids or go psycho on you. This is our future gentlemen.

The responses were near unanimous in their approval. [Again, sic throughout.]

Christov: If you want to see men “go their own way,” develop sex robots. Women will sing a different tune when men can go out and fuck a robot that is better than said women in every way.

Martyg: I can foresee a time — not too far off — where it is assumed that everyone will have one of these. If you don’t, it’ll be unusual like not owning a tv.

Oasid: I get more excited looking at images of these dolls than I do any woman I meet. I even started searching Amazon for outfits for her: like Slave Princess Leaioutfits, Cave Girl outfits and Jasmine from Aladdin outfits.

The main dissenter:

Collateral: have fun with your robots and techshit while i bang hookers / escorts / prostitutes and order whatever i want from the menu without saying a single word. Aint nobody got time for robots!

Not surprisingly, Milo Yiannopoulos, darling of the alt right, squarely aligns with the MGTOWs.

Given the brand affinity, I was curious if the people at RealDoll were aware that a nonzero portion of their consumer base views their sexy cyborgs as offering more than the occasional sexual release — they’re ready to take them on as life partners (and as essentially a replacement for all human women).

“I’ve heard about MGTOW,” confirms Matt McMullen, the 48-year-old RealDoll CEO, who explains that many of his customers have decided — for one reason or another — to forgo a relationship with women, a decision he says he totally understands. “When you got married 100 years ago, you stayed married and were loyal. Now people cheat on each other; they lie and do things behind each other’s back. So for a guy who’s already foreseeing a messy divorce and thinking, I don’t want to spend my money on that, this makes perfect sense.”

McMullen studied art in college and began sculpting female figures in his garage as a hobby. “It started as a concept I had for a posable sculpture — a highly realistic mannequin,” he says. At that point, in 1994, sex dolls were cheaply made from plastic and little more than bachelor party gag gifts. So he created the first silicone sex doll with a completely accurate, fully articulated skeleton that could bend its limbs every which way and remain in those positions.

The company he founded, Abyss Creations, began selling the RealDoll for $3,500 in 1997 to great acclaim. That year, for example, Howard Stern ordered one and gleefully exclaimed, “Best sex I ever had! I swear to God! This RealDoll feels better than a real woman!”…

more…

https://melmagazine.com/the-men-committed-to-replacing-women-with-a-i-sex-dolls-7d451b56d655

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