What A War With North Korea Would Probably Look Like

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Back in 2013 during the last major flare up between the U.S. and North Korea I wrote an extensive analysis on the North Korean wild card and how it could be used by globalists as a catalyst for international economic instability titled ‘Will Globalists Use North Korea To Trigger Catastrophe?’ As I have warned consistently over the years, like Syria, North Korea is a longstanding chaos box; a big red button that the elites can press any time they wish to instigate a chain of greater geopolitical tensions. The question has always been, will they actually use it?

Well, it appears that under the Trump administration the establishment might go for broke. I have not seen U.S. war rhetoric so intense since the second invasion of Iraq, and all over missile tests which have been standard fare for North Korea for many years. With whispers by Trump aides of a possible 50,000 boots on the ground in Syria, and open discussion of preemptive strikes in North Korea, this time kinetic conflict is highly likely.

Yes, we have seen such military pressures before, but this time feels different. Why is an aimless quagmire war with massive potential global financial repercussions more likely under Trump? Because Trump ran under a nationalist conservative banner, and he will forever be labeled a nationalist conservative even if his behavior appears to be more globalist in nature.

Rhetoric is often more psychologically powerful in the minds of the masses than action. Therefore, everything Trump does from now on will also be labeled a product of the “nationalist conservative” ideology; including all of his screw-ups. And, with Trump in office the establishment is perfectly happy to pursue actions once considered taboo, because demonizing conservatives and liberty proponents is one of their primary objectives.

When the real insanity starts, liberty movement activists will gnash their teeth and scream at the top of their lungs that Trump is “not acting like a conservative,” so how can conservative thinking be blamed by extension? But these people just don’t grasp the thought processes of the human mind. No matter how much we try to separate ourselves from the Trump-train if (or when) he goes full-bore globalist, our efforts will be futile. The mainstream media has spent considerable time and effort making sure that all of us are lumped in with the so-called “alt-right.”  Remember, I tried to warn the movement about this long before Trump won the election.

Currently, there are questions as to whether or not a naval task force is en route to North Korea.  I would not trust the latest reports that all units are headed to Australia when Vice President Mike Pence is in Japan yesterday saying “the sword stands ready”.  Could this be more posturing or a precursor to a strike scenario? I am reminded of the U.S.S. Maddox which was sent to patrol the waters off of Vietnam, the same destroyer that reported an attack by North Vietnamese torpedo boats which was used as justification for the initiation of the Vietnam War. As it turned out, no such attack actually occurred.

The presence of a U.S. fleet off North Korea could only be intended to instigate further aggression, not defuse the situation.

So, if war with North Korea is inevitable given the circumstances, what would such a war look like? Here are some elements I think are most important; elements that make the war almost unwinnable, if winning is even the purpose…

North Korean Air Defense

The North Koreans spent the better part of the last war with the U.S. being heavily battered by air bombardments. They have had plenty of time since then to consider this problem and prepare. Even the most gung-ho American military minds are forced to admit that using only air based attacks in North Korea is not practical. And where we have been spoiled by steady video streams of laser guided hell dropped on Iraqi and Afghani targets in the past, don’t expect things to go so easily in North Korea.

While North Korea is still rife with economic problems (like every other communist and socialist nation), they still have an industrial base and produce many of their own arms. This includes and extensive missile net backed by a maze of radar systems. Their air force is by all accounts obsolete, but as I have mentioned in the past, advanced missile defense is the wave of the future. It’s cheaper and can render expensive enemy air force and naval units impotent…

more…

http://sorendreier.com/what-a-war-with-north-korea-would-probably-look-like/

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How an episode of The Simpsons is made

In 1996, The Simpsons passed The Flintstones as the longest running prime-time animated show. In the 30-year interim, the tenor of adult cartoons had shifted dramatically: The Simpsons was more caustic and puerile than The Flintstones, a shameless Stone Age remake of hit 1950s sitcom The Honeymooners. What had hardly changed was the creative process.

Like The Flintstones, The Simpsons relied on a large Los Angeles-based writer’s room, a coterie of directors, a squad of storyboard and design artists, and dozens of animators. The biggest change in production over three decades was simply geography; by 1996, The Simpsons had begun outsourcing the final stage of animation to a studio in South Korea.

A year after The Simpsons passed The Flintstones, South Park premiered on Comedy Central. If The Simpsons was a middle finger to the establishment, the animation of Trey Parker and Matt Stone was a burning bag of shit. It was cheap and fast to animate with paper cutouts and computer animation, which allowed the show to comment on recent events. Cartoons at the time, requiring months of costly animation, needed to be comparably timeless in their story and humor, but South Park targeted the present.

Thanks to computer animation and the internet, South Park, the shows of Adult Swim, and countless online-only animated shorts, like Homestar Runner, have made animation faster, rougher, and looser. But The Simpsons, to this day, embraces the formula of the past. While an episode of South Park can now be created in a single week by a lean team, The Simpsons has actually added roles and failsafes to its lengthy process. In the world of animated TV, The Simpsons may be the last of its kind, an expensive, high-touch, slow-paced production built on formulas dating back to Walt Disney and Hanna-Barbera.

The Simpsons
is now in its 27th season. This is how an episode of the program is made, a detailed, meticulous look at a process that has its bedrock but builds upon it with the tools and lessons of the future.

It begins with a pitch….

A few weeks before the warm Christmas of Southern California, the writers of The Simpsons — the longest-running sitcom in the US, starring everybody’s favorite family: Homer, Marge, Lisa, Baby Maggie, and their son Bart — take a retreat. The rest of the season, the team breaks scripts in the sterile writers’ rooms of the Fox studio lot, but the creative process always began in a home or the big conference space of a nearby hotel.

Each writer brings a fleshed-out minute or so episode pitch, which they deliver with gusto to a room full of funny people. They laugh, take notes, then co-creator Matt Groening, executive producer James L. Brooks, and showrunner Al Jean — a portion of the braintrust from the earliest days — provide feedback.

In an essay on Splitsider about the writing process of seasons three through eight, former Simpsons writer and producer Bill Oakley described the pleasure of the retreats:

“It was always a huge treat to see. You had no idea what George Meyer (for instance) was going to say, and suddenly it was like this fantastic Simpsons episode pouring out of his mouth that you never dreamed of. And it was like, wow, this is where this stuff comes from.

A lot of times people worked collaboratively, too. We would work with Conan, back and forth, and we’d exchange ideas and help polish them up. And so everybody would usually come with two, sometimes three ideas. You’d take fifteen minutes and you’d say your idea in front of everybody — all the writers, Jim Brooks, Matt Groening, Sam Simon when he was still there, and also the writers assistants who would be there taking notes on all this stuff.”

Writing a draft

After receiving notes and some creative direction, an episode’s writer takes two weeks to pen a first draft. “Almost all of the writing is done here at the Fox [lot] in one of two rewrite rooms,” says Al Jean, who at the time of the interview is deep into production of the show’s upcoming 27th season. “The two rooms was a change that came about around season nine. We split because we had enough writers, and we could get more done.”

Getting more done with more tools and more hands is the throughline of the modern Simpsons production process. There are more people doing more jobs with more failsafes at a higher cost on The Simpsons than the majority of — if not all — animated television shows.

A writer has four to six weeks to complete rewrites. “We’ll continue to rework [the script] six or seven times before the table read,” says Al Jean. “Jim and I will give notes. We rewrite it.”

In those late night television commercials that promise to make everyone a screenwriter, the script is often called the blueprint of our favorite television shows and films, a term that implies an exacting, blessed, top level instruction which the rest of the dozens if not hundreds if not thousands of artists involved obey. That notion — as anyone who has seen a summer blockbuster or network sitcom can tell — is false. The script is vulnerable, malleable, and subject to constant scrutiny. There’s a blueprint for animated shows, but it comes later. The completed draft is like a guide through the woods, ready to be supplemented, revised, or outright redrawn if need be.

(An excerpt from Judd Apatow’s The Simpsons script, The Daily Beast)

The table read

Each Thursday of production, the cast, producers, and writers meet for a table read of the latest script. Some of the cast attends the table read, others phone into the room. Occasionally, voice actor Chris Edgerly, who has handled “additional voices” for the show since 2011, will fill in for one of the leads. “It’s very unusual that they’re all at the table at the same time now,” says Jean. “People’s schedules got busier, people actually moved out of Los Angeles. It’s the normal sort of entropy of life, you know.”

Despite being to hundreds of table reads, Al Jean still can’t get comfortable. He describes a critical setting in which the script is judged on its creative value, but also under the duress of external forces. A cell phone might go off or an actor might be fighting a cold, and the read’s vibe shifts. “Last week,” says Jean, “there was a truck backing up, that came in the middle, and that was distracting people. The table read is my number one unpleasant experience.”

Voice recording

On the Monday following a table read, the cast performs the voice recording, typically at the studio in LA. The actors and actresses record on separate tracks, rather than together — a common method for capturing voice-over. “It’s funny,” says Jean. “I read a review in The AV Club where they said about a certain show there was great interaction between two people, and they never met. They didn’t record in the same place. I’m glad it worked, but there was no physical connection.”

Direction

As work transitions from script to animation, the episode is offered to a director, who, if they accept, is given ownership of production and animation responsibilities. “[The role is] sort of akin to a TV director who takes the script of a show and turns it into an episode,” says Jean. “Except our director has to create everything. [… The director] takes the audio track, supervises the design, the motions, and what we call the acting of the animation, and [supervises] the whole visual aspect of [the episode].”

Both Jean, who serves as story liaison throughout production of the series as a whole, and each episode’s director work in tandem to shepherd the script through the animation process…

more…

http://www.theverge.com/2015/10/25/9457247/the-simpsons-al-jean-interview

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Raising good robots

Resultado de imagem para Gael Rougegrez of the Blanca Li Dance Company performs ‘Robot’, 22 February 2017 in London, England. Photo by Ian Gavan/Getty

Image edited by Web Investigator- Gael Rougegrez of the Blanca Li Dance Company performs ‘Robot’, 22 February 2017 in London, England. Photo by Ian Gavan/Getty

We already have a way to teach morals to alien intelligences: it’s called parenting. Can we apply the same methods to robots?

Regina Rini is an assistant professor and faculty fellow at the New York University Center for Bioethics, and an affiliate faculty member in the Medical Ethics division of the NYU Department of Population Health.

 

Intelligent machines, long promised and never delivered, are finally on the horizon. Sufficiently intelligent robots will be able to operate autonomously from human control. They will be able to make genuine choices. And if a robot can make choices, there is a real question about whether it will make moral choices. But what is moral for a robot? Is this the same as what’s moral for a human?

Philosophers and computer scientists alike tend to focus on the difficulty of implementing subtle human morality in literal-minded machines. But there’s another problem, one that really ought to come first. It’s the question of whether we ought to try to impose our own morality on intelligent machines at all. In fact, I’d argue that doing so is likely to be counterproductive, and even unethical. The real problem of robot morality is not the robots, but us. Can we handle sharing the world with a new type of moral creature?

We like to imagine that artificial intelligence (AI) will be similar to humans, because we are the only advanced intelligence we know. But we are probably wrong. If and when AI appears, it will probably be quite unlike us. It might not reason the way we do, and we could have difficulty understanding its choices.

In 2016, a computer program challenged Lee Sedol, humanity’s leading player of the ancient game of Go. The program, a Google project called AlphaGo, is an early example of what AI might be like. In the second game of the match, AlphaGo made a move – ‘Move 37’ – that stunned expert commenters. Some thought it was a mistake. Lee, the human opponent, stood up from the table and left the room. No one quite knew what AlphaGo was doing; this was a tactic that expert human players simply did not use. But it worked. AlphaGo won that match, as it had the game before and the next game. In the end, Lee won only a single game out of five.

AlphaGo is very, very good at Go, but it is not good in the same way that humans are. Not even its creators can explain how it settles on its strategy in each game. Imagine that you could talk to AlphaGo and ask why it made Move 37. Would it be able to explain the choice to you – or to human Go experts? Perhaps. Artificial minds needn’t work as ours do to accomplish similar tasks.

In fact, we might discover that intelligent machines think about everything, not just Go, in ways that are alien us. You don’t have to imagine some horrible science-fiction scenario, where robots go on a murderous rampage. It might be something more like this: imagine that robots show moral concern for humans, and robots, and most animals… and also sofas. They are very careful not to damage sofas, just as we’re careful not to damage babies. We might ask the machines: why are you so worried about sofas? And their explanation might not make sense to us, just as AlphaGo’s explanation of Move 37 might not make sense.

This line of thinking takes us to the heart of a very old philosophical puzzle about the nature of morality. Is it something above and beyond human experience, something that applies to anyone or anything that could make choices – or is morality a distinctly human creation, something specially adapted to our particular existence?

Long before robots, the ancient Greeks had to grapple with the morality of a different kind of alien mind: the teenager. The Greeks worried endlessly about how to cultivate morality in their youth. Plato thought that our human concept of justice, like all human concepts, was a pale reflection of some perfect form of Justice. He believed that we have an innate acquaintance with these forms, but that we understand them only dimly as children. Perhaps we will encounter pure Justice after death, but the task of philosophy is to try to reason our way back to these truths while we are still living…

more…

https://aeon.co/essays/creating-robots-capable-of-moral-reasoning-is-like-parenting

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Forget About Terraforming Mars. Here’s Why.

The Red Planet lacks a source of carbon dioxide that could transform its thin, cold atmosphere into something resembling conditions on Earth.

 https://www.seeker.com/space/planets/forget-about-terraforming-mars-heres-why
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14,923 nukes: All the nations armed with nuclear weapons and how many they have

by Skye Gould and Dave Mosher

When it comes to the threat of nuclear war, 2017 is shaping up to be a watershed moment.

Relations between the US and Russia — the two foremost nuclear superpowers — has reached a “low point” because of the US’s accusations that Russia meddled in the US election and is involved with the use of chemical weapons in Syria. Meanwhile, North Korea draws ever closer to constructing a device that could threaten Washington.

President Donald Trump has also inherited a $1 trillion program to modernize US nukes, and Russia now strains its budget to do the same for its arsenal. (In regard to Russia’s nuclear modernization, Trump has even said, “Let it be an arms race.”)

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists took note of these and other developments in January by advancing its Doomsday Clock 30 seconds. The symbolic shift implies that humanity is now just 2 minutes 30 seconds away from an apocalyptic “midnight.”

World events since January would do little to improve that outlook.

Tensions between the US and North Korea have soared in recent months, with the isolated nation threatening to rain down “nuclear thunderbolts” if the US follows through on rumblings of preemptive strikes — all while the isolated nation reportedly gears up for another test of a nuclear device.

Experts disagree on how many deliverable nuclear weapons North Korea possesses, but more is known about other arsenals around the world. Below is a map that shows the best estimates of which countries have them and how many they have.

BI Graphics_Nuke CountSkye Gould/Business Insider

http://www.businessinsider.com/nuclear-weapons-stockpiles-world-map-2017-4

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Trump Uses Nukes: VT Teams Rush to Site of Nuclear Bunker Buster in Afghanistan

Will collect soil samples, witness statements as Trump’s professed love of nukes becomes a reality

 

Trump’s first use of nuclear weapons, soon to be unleashed on Syria Arab Army, according to NSC sources:

For those within 15 miles of the blast area or downwind:  Please remove yourself from the area for 72 hours or up to 2 weeks.  Bring no food or water, wash throughly, wash clothing in water from well outside the blast area.  Wear a dust mask  More information to come:

Control of the press and the puppet government in Kabul makes this possible.  Afghanistan has become a testing ground for nuclear, biological and chemical weapons by the United States.

This is the cover story, one America has used over and over, first its fuel-air bombs or “daisy-cutters” and now the MOAB, a weapon Trump would never touch as nuking Afghanistan is an old neocon play used many times.  Our investigations in Afghanistan have revealed the nuclear poisoning of that country from not only indiscriminate use of semi-depleted uranium munitions but the use, on at least 8 occasions, of tactical nuclear weapons.  This is the cover story:

The US military has dropped the largest non-nuclear bomb in the American arsenal on an area of eastern Afghanistan known to be populated by Daesh (ISIL) terrorists, according to the US Defense Department.

A GBU-43/B Massive Ordnance Air Blast Bomb (MOAB), also known as the “mother of all bombs,” was dropped at 7 pm local time Thursday, the Pentagon confirmed.

A GBU-43/B on display at the US Air Force Armament Museum in Eglin Air Force Base, Florida.

The Pentagon confirmed the strike was the first time the enormous bomb had been used in combat.

Now hear the truth from Press TV 2012

US Used Micro Nukes in Afghanistan and Iraq Wars:  An interview with Gordon Duff, Senior Editor of Veterans Today

…the US has produced approximately 600 micro nukes, some of them smaller than a soccer ball, with the capability as low as a single ton of TNT dialable up to 40 tons of TNT. There is evidence that those weapons have been used in Iraq and Afghanistan. Studies have found uranium 235 to be in the bodies of the population there.”

The United States’ use of powerful genetic weapons such as depleted uranium on the battle field is in violation of every conceivable international law, says an analyst.

Depleted uranium has a half-life of 4.5 billion years and has thus earned the title “The silent killer that will never stop killing”.

Shells, bombs and cruise missiles tipped with depleted uranium and tungsten easily pierce through heavy armor and fortifications. Air, water and soil are also contaminated when such weapons are used.

Dr. Doug Rokke, the ex-director of the Pentagon’s Depleted Uranium Project, says there is no way to totally decontaminate an area hit with uranium. (Editor:  Comprehensive video from 2002, demonstrating our decade plus DU cover up.  Please forward and watch as much as possible.)

YouTube – Veterans Today –

Serious long-term health problems caused by the use of depleted uranium in bombs can range from cancer to leukemia and genetic mutations.

The United Nations has prohibited the manufacture, testing, use, sale and stockpiling of depleted uranium weapons.

The US dropped thousands of depleted uranium bombs on the Iraq city of Fallujah in 2003, which killed thousands of people.

A great proportion of all births in Fallujah since the strike have suffered from abnormalities and the rate of mutation among newborns is higher than what was found in Japan after America attacked the Asian country during the Second World War.

Press TV has conducted an interview with senior editor of Veterans Today (VT) website, Gordon Duff, to further discuss the issue.

The video also offers the opinions of two other guests: political analyst and writer Linh Dinh, and peace activist Max Obuszewksi.

The following is a rough transcription of the interview.

Press TV: Gordon Duff, when we are speaking about the reasons why not a single country has gotten rid of its nuclear weapons, some people are saying this is about nuclear superiority, a kind of deterrence as our guest Linh Dinh there was saying as well, the issue of guaranteeing the security of a nation when it comes to how officials describe it. Basically what do you think are the reasons and could you say that there is any strategic value in keeping nuclear weapons?

Duff: Well there are a couple of different levels to look at this. We left two nations out, Pakistan and India, and they are of the highest risk of nuclear war than any two nations on earth.Most people don’t know that since 1982 Brazil has held between ten and twenty nuclear weapons that they have developed.

Japan has an interim nuclear capability in that they are sitting on tons of enriched uranium at a facility in a…prefecture…and bombs that are ready to assemble but not assembled.

They have decided though that they have the capability not to exercise that capability, which is in interim standing, that some have suggested would be a position that they could live with involving Iran.

The issue that is brought up by a previous speaker, however, is that we have thoroughly seen in the last year that nuclear power itself can be as harmful as nuclear weapons.

That although nuclear weapons supposedly have secured peace through mutual assured destruction, every nuclear facility in the world leaks radiation and the nuclear industry is so powerful it suppresses bad news…

more…

http://www.veteranstoday.com/2017/04/13/trump-uses-nukes-vt-teams-rush-to-site-of-nuclear-bunker-buster-in-afghanistan/

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Has humanity already lost control of artificial intelligence? Scientists admit that computers are learning too quickly for humans to keep up

Scientists are concerned that computers are already overtaking us in their abilities, raising the prospect that we could lose control of them altogether. Pictured is the Terminator film, in which robots take over - a prospect that could soon become a reality

 Scientists are concerned that computers are already overtaking us in their abilities, raising the prospect that we could lose control of them altogether. Pictured is the Terminator film, in which robots take over – a prospect that could soon become a reality
  • Last year, scientists made a driverless car that learned by watching humans
  • But even the creators of the car did not understand how it learned this way
  • In another study, a computer could pinpoint people with schizophrenia
  • Again, its creators were unsure how it was able to do this 

From driving cars to beating chess masters at their own game, computers are already performing incredible feats.

And artificial intelligence is quickly advancing, allowing computers to learn from experience without the need for human input.

But scientists are concerned that computers are already overtaking us in their abilities, raising the prospect that we could lose control of them altogether.

ROBOT TAKEOVER

A recent report by PwC found that four in 10 jobs are at risk of being replaced by robots.

The report also found that 38 per cent of US jobs will be replaced by robots and artificial intelligence by the early 2030s.

The analysis revealed that 61 per cent of financial services jobs are at risk of a robot takeover.

This is compared to 30 per cent of UK jobs, 35 per cent of Germany and 21 per cent in Japan.

Last year, a driverless car took to the streets of New Jersey, which ran without any human intervention.

The car, created by Nvidia, could make its own decisions after watching how humans learned how to drive.

But despite creating the car, Nvidia admitted that it wasn’t sure how the car was able to learn in this way, according to MIT Technology Review.

The car’s underlying technology was ‘deep learning’ – a powerful tool based on the neural layout of the human brain.

Deep learning is used in a range of technologies, including tagging your friends on social media, and allowing Siri to answer questions.

The system is also being used by the military, which hopes to use deep learning to steer ships, destroy targets and control deadly drones.

There is also hope that deep learning could be used in medicine to diagnose rare diseases.

But if its creators lose control of the system, we’re in big trouble, experts claim…

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4401836/Has-humanity-lost-control-artificial-intelligence.html#ixzz4e2FVAjWz
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