Should Beginners Use Meditation Apps? A New Study Warns of Adverse Effects

A study in Psychotherapy Research indicates that people who started meditating using an app may be more likely to develop what’s known as “meditation sickness.” By Wendy Biddlecombe Agsar Anew study published in the journal Psychotherapy Research indicates that people who started meditating using an app have a higher likelihood of developing the adverse effects that can result from meditation practice.   This finding was included in “Prevalence of meditation-related adverse effects in a population-based sample in the United States,” which was published in June 2021. The study’s authors conducted what they believe to be the first population-based survey of the adverse effects of meditation (participants, it should … Continue reading Should Beginners Use Meditation Apps? A New Study Warns of Adverse Effects

Artificial Intelligence Will Kill Capitalism

Technology Will Kill Your Job. And it will happen sooner than you think… by Laurent Alexandre -OpEd- PARIS — For a long time, artificial intelligence was little more than science fiction — now it’s now just a matter of time until it becomes reality. The boom of computing capabilities have seen the power of servers multiplied a billion times over in the span of just 31 years, making it likely that an artificial intelligence superior to our own will emerge in the coming decades.The GAFA (Google, Apple, Facebook and Amazon) Internet giants, as well as IBM, have all been investing massively in the … Continue reading Artificial Intelligence Will Kill Capitalism

Triggering the Body’s Defenses to Fight Cancer

Experiments once considered crazy are now helping scientists attack tumors. BY LINA ZELDOVICH One day in 2010, when oncologist Paul Muizelaar operated on a patient with glioblastoma—a brain tumor infamous for its deathly toll—he did something shocking. First, he cut the skull open and carved out as much of the tumor as he could. But before he replaced the piece of skull to close the wound, he soaked it in a solution containing Enterobacter aerogenes,1 bacteria found in feces. For the next month, the patient lay in a coma in an intensive care unit battling the bacteria he was infected with—and then … Continue reading Triggering the Body’s Defenses to Fight Cancer

The search for alien tech

There’s a new plan to find extraterrestrial civilisations by the way they live. But if we can see them, can they see us? Corey S Powell is a science editor and journalist. He has been editor at Discover, Scientific American and Aeon. He is the author of God in the Equation (2003), and co-author of Undeniable (2014), Unstoppable (2016) and Everything All at Once (2017) with Bill Nye, with whom he also makes the Science Rules! podcast. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.  Edited byPam Weintraub Are we alone in the Universe? And if not, should we be excited – or afraid? These questions are as immediate as the latest Netflix hit … Continue reading The search for alien tech

Quantum computers: Eight ways quantum computing is going to change the world

Businesses are already exploring the future potential of quantum computers, and some industries anticipate big changes ahead. By Daphne Leprince-Ringuet The world’s biggest companies are now launching quantum computing programs, and governments are pouring money into quantum research. For systems that have yet prove useful, quantum computers are certainly garnering lots of attention. The reason is that quantum computers, although still far from having reached maturity, are expected to eventually usher in a whole new era of computing — one in which the hardware is no longer a constraint when resolving complex problems, meaning that some calculations that would take years or … Continue reading Quantum computers: Eight ways quantum computing is going to change the world

How privacy became a forgotten virtue

Dave Eggers book, “The Circle,” uses satire to illuminate how privacy is fast becoming a lost virtue in the digital age. by Jonny Thomson KEY TAKEAWAYS In Dave Eggers’ book, “The Circle,” we are told to imagine a world where “secrets are lies, sharing is caring, and privacy is theft.”  We live in a world where sharing our most intimate moments, as well as our day to day banality, is the norm. Openness is a virtue while privacy is on the decline.  But privacy is essential to who we are as human beings. It’s a virtue we need to bring … Continue reading How privacy became a forgotten virtue

Tales Of Technology And Faith

Sci-fi enables us to think about science and religion as mutually supportive elements of what it means to be human. BY AMANDA REES – Amanda Rees is a historian of science at the University of York. In 1948, L. Ron Hubbard is reported to have said, “You don’t get rich writing science fiction. If you want to get rich, you start a religion.” Two years later, he did just that. His short story, “Dianetics: The Evolution of a Science,” which appeared in the May 1950 issue of Astounding Science Fiction magazine, laid the foundation of what evolved into the globally significant (and … Continue reading Tales Of Technology And Faith

China Tested A Fractional Orbital Bombardment System That Uses A Hypersonic Glide Vehicle

Such a capability could potentially allow China to execute a nuclear strike on any target on earth with near-impunity and very little warning. BY TYLER ROGOWAY  Areport from Financial Times’ Demetri Sevastopulo and Kathrin Hille states that China has tested a nuclear-capable hypersonic glide vehicle that goes into space and traverses the globe in an orbital-like fashion before making its run through the atmosphere toward its target. There would be huge implications if such a system were to be operationalized, and according to this story, which says it talked to five officials confirming the test, the U.S. government was caught totally off-guard by it. The trial flight … Continue reading China Tested A Fractional Orbital Bombardment System That Uses A Hypersonic Glide Vehicle

Are Universities On The Wrong Side Of History?

by Ann Kirschner earching for answers to this and other mysteries of Planet Academe, I found some excellent responses in a new book, The Great Upheaval: Higher Education’s Past, Present, and Uncertain Future, by Arthur Levine and Scott Van Pelt.  I’ve been waiting for someone to write a book like this for a long time. That said, almost all of it could have been written ten, even twenty years ago. Higher education was in trouble before the pandemic;  Covid provided the unexpected receding tide that exposed our naked academic body politic.  The authors’ warning that American colleges and universities are heading for a … Continue reading Are Universities On The Wrong Side Of History?

Spotify Has Made All Music Into Background Music

Is the collapse of genre boundaries and the erosion of fervent musical loyalties a good thing? By Jack Hamilton Ispent much of my youth in sprawling record stores, drifting through aisles marked by signs that said things like rock, r&b, hip-hop, and—it was the ’90s—alternative. Anyone who grew up in or near a city in the later decades of the 20th century probably remembers the dial locations of classic rock, country, modern rock, “urban.” (Of course, there were also the catchall behemoths of Top 40 and adult contemporary; young snobs like me looked down on them as the presets of dilettantes.) But these days, to … Continue reading Spotify Has Made All Music Into Background Music