The Science and Smarts Behind Hypertrophy (and Getting Ripped)

Hypertrophy is a scientific term for increasing muscle tissue; in other words, building muscle. DRAZEN_/GETTY IMAGES BY JOHN DONOVAN If you think that getting stronger means slinging around a bunch of iron at the local gym, think again. If you think building muscle is only for buff guys in tight tank tops, think again. And if you think the term hypertrophyis too science-y and scary to even say, for your own health and well-being, you need to think again. Hypertrophy — it’s pronounced hi-PER-tro-fee, not something that sounds like an overexcited sports award — is a scientific term, true. But it’s not all that scary. From … Continue reading The Science and Smarts Behind Hypertrophy (and Getting Ripped)

Is faster better? How short, intense workouts can help you lose weight quickly

by: Melissa Smith (Natural News) Do you feel like your exercise routine isn’t helping you lose weight? Try high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and sprint interval training. These two short, intense exercises can help you lose weight faster than continuous moderate exercises, according to a study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. For the study, researchers from the Federal University of Goiásin Brazil analyzed previous studies that compared the effects of intense interval training with continuous moderate-intensity exercise over at least four weeks’ time. They used data from 41 studies involving 1,115 people combined for thematic analysis and the results from 36 studies involving 1,012 people. … Continue reading Is faster better? How short, intense workouts can help you lose weight quickly

Teresa Wolande on the Psychology of Golf: Staying out of Your Own Way

by Krystal Perkins As Tiger Woods stormed back into the pro golf scene and actually won a tournament, the golfing world watched in disbelief. After all, having been through a devastating back injury that forced him to stay away from the sport for a couple of years, nobody expected to see him make a comeback at all. So, when he climbed to the top of the world again, 22 years after he first won the masters, people who understand the context were amazed. Mr. Woods’ story has a lot do to with something that many golfers fail to understand. The fact … Continue reading Teresa Wolande on the Psychology of Golf: Staying out of Your Own Way

A new review looks into the optimum exercise intensity, type and duration for boosting mood

By Christian Jarrett It’s well-known that physical exercise is beneficial not just to physical health but also our mental health. Yet whereas most countries have detailed, evidence-backed guidelines on the type and intensity of exercise required for various physical health benefits, such guidelines do not yet exist for exercise and mood. This is partly due to a lack of necessary evidence. However, a new systematic review in The Journal of Psychology Interdisciplinary and Applied brings us usefully up-to-date on the current findings in this area, collating evidence from 38 relevant studies that examined the associations between exercise intensity, duration and modality and any effects on … Continue reading A new review looks into the optimum exercise intensity, type and duration for boosting mood

Serena Williams exemplifies the new, deranged Left: When they lose, it’s never their fault, so they attack and verbally abuse the referees

 by: Vicki Batts (Natural News) Serena Williams may be a tennis legend, but her reaction to being dealt late-game penalties and losing at the U.S. Open women’s final is nothing admirable. The sports star received multiple penalties during the game for violating the rules. Instead of taking it all in stride, Williams lashed out at referee Carlos Ramos, accusing him of “sexism” and calling him a “thief.” Much like former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, Williams believes she has been “wronged” by a man on the court, insisting Ramos “stole” her victory. After all, how could Williams ever be defeated by another woman? The … Continue reading Serena Williams exemplifies the new, deranged Left: When they lose, it’s never their fault, so they attack and verbally abuse the referees

What Makes a Good Pregame Speech?

by Andrew Fiouzi Coaches—from Pee-Wee to the NCAA—on what fires us up Back in November, Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Jameis Winston tried to give his team a fiery, “Eat a W!”-centric pregame speech to pump them up. It was…not entirely successful? It’s always a surprise to see a bad motivational speech, because whether it’s Al Pacino moving beefy foot players to tears in the locker room or Kyle Chandler doing, well, the exact same thing, we’ve become accustomed to coaches in movies and TV shows delivering rousing last-minute speeches to inspire their team to victory. But since most real-life coaches don’t have access to … Continue reading What Makes a Good Pregame Speech?

Ultra-marathon runner who ran 50 to 100 miles every day developed anemia because the force of his foot hitting the pavement destroyed his blood cells

 by: Frances Bloomfield (Natural News) Too much of anything can be bad for you, exercise included. That’s a lesson that 41-year old Christopher Pokrana learned after he developed mild anemia — mild anemia brought about by his love of long-distance running. The fervent ultra-marathon runner discovered his condition after a health screening, reported the DailyMail.co.uk. Prior to the screening, he showed no signs nor symptoms of anemia, like fatigue and loss of energy. However, Pokrana did inform doctors that he would train for marathons constantly. On the days when he would put on his running shoes and hit the pavement, he would run anywhere … Continue reading Ultra-marathon runner who ran 50 to 100 miles every day developed anemia because the force of his foot hitting the pavement destroyed his blood cells