A new review looks into the optimum exercise intensity, type and duration for boosting mood

By Christian Jarrett It’s well-known that physical exercise is beneficial not just to physical health but also our mental health. Yet whereas most countries have detailed, evidence-backed guidelines on the type and intensity of exercise required for various physical health benefits, such guidelines do not yet exist for exercise and mood. This is partly due to a lack of necessary evidence. However, a new systematic review in The Journal of Psychology Interdisciplinary and Applied brings us usefully up-to-date on the current findings in this area, collating evidence from 38 relevant studies that examined the associations between exercise intensity, duration and modality and any effects on … Continue reading A new review looks into the optimum exercise intensity, type and duration for boosting mood

Serena Williams exemplifies the new, deranged Left: When they lose, it’s never their fault, so they attack and verbally abuse the referees

 by: Vicki Batts (Natural News) Serena Williams may be a tennis legend, but her reaction to being dealt late-game penalties and losing at the U.S. Open women’s final is nothing admirable. The sports star received multiple penalties during the game for violating the rules. Instead of taking it all in stride, Williams lashed out at referee Carlos Ramos, accusing him of “sexism” and calling him a “thief.” Much like former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, Williams believes she has been “wronged” by a man on the court, insisting Ramos “stole” her victory. After all, how could Williams ever be defeated by another woman? The … Continue reading Serena Williams exemplifies the new, deranged Left: When they lose, it’s never their fault, so they attack and verbally abuse the referees

What Makes a Good Pregame Speech?

by Andrew Fiouzi Coaches—from Pee-Wee to the NCAA—on what fires us up Back in November, Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Jameis Winston tried to give his team a fiery, “Eat a W!”-centric pregame speech to pump them up. It was…not entirely successful? It’s always a surprise to see a bad motivational speech, because whether it’s Al Pacino moving beefy foot players to tears in the locker room or Kyle Chandler doing, well, the exact same thing, we’ve become accustomed to coaches in movies and TV shows delivering rousing last-minute speeches to inspire their team to victory. But since most real-life coaches don’t have access to … Continue reading What Makes a Good Pregame Speech?

Ultra-marathon runner who ran 50 to 100 miles every day developed anemia because the force of his foot hitting the pavement destroyed his blood cells

 by: Frances Bloomfield (Natural News) Too much of anything can be bad for you, exercise included. That’s a lesson that 41-year old Christopher Pokrana learned after he developed mild anemia — mild anemia brought about by his love of long-distance running. The fervent ultra-marathon runner discovered his condition after a health screening, reported the DailyMail.co.uk. Prior to the screening, he showed no signs nor symptoms of anemia, like fatigue and loss of energy. However, Pokrana did inform doctors that he would train for marathons constantly. On the days when he would put on his running shoes and hit the pavement, he would run anywhere … Continue reading Ultra-marathon runner who ran 50 to 100 miles every day developed anemia because the force of his foot hitting the pavement destroyed his blood cells

What Lurks Behind Rabid Sports Fandom?

Hooliganism comes down to a fear of death. BY MARY PILON The soccer match hadn’t even started when the cops showed up. On the streets of Marseille, France, the officers—helmeted, shields in hands, batons on belts—charged through a crowd to break up a thicket of English and Russian fans who were hurling bottles, threats, and insults at each other. Some fans were bare-chested, caked with dried blood, screaming at the top of their lungs. Others clutched plastic cups of beer while trying to avoid the clouds of tear gas. The scene broke up when a knot of fans left for … Continue reading What Lurks Behind Rabid Sports Fandom?

Here’s All the Exercise Advice That Requires No Exercise

Illustration by Carly Jean Andrews by Andrew Fiouzi After all, working out can kill you As a native son of L.A., I have a complicated relationship with exercise. Growing up in a city notorious for its driving culture, I, like most of my fellow purebreds, prefer to drive as little as one block rather than to walk the same distance. On the other hand, everyone here looks like they’ve just left the gym — a sort of citywide form of peer pressure to be in the best possible shape at all times. So when I come across a study or article that tells me do … Continue reading Here’s All the Exercise Advice That Requires No Exercise

Why So Many Athletes Have Such Terrible Diets

by John McDermott In 2013, NBA big man Dwight Howard developed a rare nerve disorder called dysesthesia while playing for the Los Angeles Lakers. He had tingling in his extremities and was losing motor function, to the point he had difficulty catching passes. Dysesthesia is common among prediabetics — not men who make a living physically exerting themselves. But Lakers nutritionist Cate Shanahan knew Howard had a “legendary sweet tooth,” and suspected his tingling was due to his sugar intake. Sure enough, Howard revealed to her he had been consuming an unthinkable amount of sugar. According to ESPN: “Howard had been scarfing down … Continue reading Why So Many Athletes Have Such Terrible Diets