The Secrets of The World’s Greatest Freediver

With only a single breath, Alexey Molchanov, history’s most daring freediver, is reaching improbable depths—and discovering a new kind of enlightenment as he conquers one of the world’s wildest sports. BY DANIEL RILEY PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAAN VERHOEVEN 1. Rhapsody in Blue For all the complex techniques required to succeed, the objective is remarkably simple: Go as deep as you can go on one breath and return to the surface without passing out or dying. This is the point of freediving. At least the competitive point. And here in the Bahamas, 42 divers from around the world have gathered, like filings to a … Continue reading The Secrets of The World’s Greatest Freediver

Want to Grow New Brain Cells and Get Smarter? Go Swimming

Good news from science if your corner of the world is broiling: Swimming is your brain’s favorite form of exercise. BY JESSICA STILLMAN The title of this post is a little misleading. Just about any kind of exercise will help spur the growth of new brain cells and make you a little bit smarter, extensive science has shown. So what’s so special about swimming specifically?  That’s the topic of a new, in-depth article on The Conversation written by neurobiologist (and avid recreational swimmer) ​​Seena Mathew. In it, she digs into new but intriguing science that shows spending some time splashing your way across the pool may offer … Continue reading Want to Grow New Brain Cells and Get Smarter? Go Swimming

The psychology of penalty shootouts after England’s devastating loss in Euro 2020 final

England lost out to Italy in the Euros 2020 final after a devastating loss on penalties. By Rebecca Marano Gareth Southgate’s side were taken to a penalty shoot out following a 1-1 draw in Sunday night’s final at Wembley. It was Saka who saw his decisive spot-kick saved by Gianluigi Donnarumma and the Italians were crowned European champions following a 3-2 victory on spot kicks. Dr Andrew Manley, a Principal Lecturer in Sport & Exercise Psychology at Leeds Beckett, said that the mental side of a penalty shootout is often the hardest part. Dr Manley said: “Sven-Göran Eriksson said on reflection … Continue reading The psychology of penalty shootouts after England’s devastating loss in Euro 2020 final

The key differences between swimming and running

by Rebecca Strong This article was medically reviewed by Joey Thurman, CSCS, CPT, FNS, a Chicago-based fitness expert and creator of The Sculpt System app. Medically Reviewed Both running and swimming are good forms of cardiovascular exercise that can burn calories while strengthening and toning muscles. Swimming and running offer a wide range of physical, mental, and social benefits, with the main difference being that swimming is less stressful on joints. If you have arthritis or suffer from back or joint pain due to an injury, swimming may be a better option for you than running. When it comes to cardiovascular exercise, running and swimming are … Continue reading The key differences between swimming and running

All stars

Is a great team more than the sum of its players? Complexity science reveals the role of strategy, synergy, swarming and more Jessica Flack is a professor at the Santa Fe Institute in New Mexico and director of the Collective Computation Group at SFI. Cade Massey is a practice professor in the Wharton School’s Operations, Information and Decisions Department at the University of Pennsylvania. He lives outside of Austin, Texas. Edited by Sally Davies ‘We know,’ Runciter said to GG, ‘that as individuals they perform well. It’s all down here on paper.’ He rattled the documents on his desk. ‘But how … Continue reading All stars

These Four Former Pro Athletes Are Using Psychedelics To Heal Their Brain Injuries

by Amanda Siebert A segment on a recent episode of HBO’s Real Sports With Bryant Gumbel begins with former NHL player Daniel Carcillo describing his plan to kill himself. He’s one of four athletes in the episode who after retiring from full-contact sports had been both physically and mentally traumatized by the long-term effects of repeated concussions, and has now found relief with psychedelics. Carcillo, former NFL player Kerry Rhodes, and former UFC fighters Ian McCall and Dean Lister are part of a growing movement of people using plant medicines like ayahuasca and magic mushrooms to help heal post-traumatic stress disorder and the symptoms … Continue reading These Four Former Pro Athletes Are Using Psychedelics To Heal Their Brain Injuries

LONG BEFORE QANON, BRITAIN HAD ITS VERY OWN — VERY DIFFERENT — ‘PIZZAGATE’

16 years ago, two high-profile soccer teams saw their heated rivalry explode. Unlike the modern Pizzagate, however, there was actual pizza involved by Tom Victor  The beauty of language often lies in its fluidity, especially when discussing cross-Atlantic cultural reference points. The old saying about the U.S. and U.K. being two countries separated by a common language has never rung truer than with these cultural curios: While the initials AOC have long been shorthand for Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on one side of the ocean, those to the east of the Atlantic have been forced to train their mind to no longer read it … Continue reading LONG BEFORE QANON, BRITAIN HAD ITS VERY OWN — VERY DIFFERENT — ‘PIZZAGATE’

The psychology of cheating in sport, from chess champions playing dirty to tennis stars’ foul play

By Kasia Delgado Cheating in games and sport is nothing new, but now and then there’s an incident of foul play that seems particularly bold. Igors Rausis, a disgraced chess grandmaster who was banned from tournaments in 2019 for six years after he was caught cheating by using a phone while sitting on a toilet, has been spotted competing under a new name. Players became suspicious of the unrated “Isa Kasimi” after he thrashed an opponent at a small tournament in Latvia. Rausis, now 59, had been the oldest player in the top 100, and was not breaching his ban because … Continue reading The psychology of cheating in sport, from chess champions playing dirty to tennis stars’ foul play

Zen in Motion

A Zen teacher and avid runner on her Buddhist approach to movement and meditation Interview with Vanessa Zuisei Goddard by Gabriel Lefferts Why, exactly, do runners run? “Most runners run not because they want to live longer, but because they want to live life to the fullest,” the acclaimed novelist Haruki Murakami, who is also an elite marathon runner, wrote in his 2009 memoir, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running.  “Exerting yourself to the fullest within your individual limits: that’s the essence of running, and a metaphor for life.”  This year, going out for a jog has taken on new meaning. … Continue reading Zen in Motion

A New Theory on Exercise’s Anti-Cancer Effect

The ability to sustain a high rate of energy burn for a prolonged period of time may help ward off cancer by Alex HutchinsonAlex Hutchinson Last fall, an international group of exercise oncologists published a major review of the literature on exercise and cancer. The news was good, if somewhat unsurprising. Regular exercise lowers your risk of developing a long list of cancers, in some cases by 10 to 25 percent; and if you do get cancer, exercise enhances the quality and possibly the expected length of your life. But there was one notable omission from the review. The experts weren’t entirely … Continue reading A New Theory on Exercise’s Anti-Cancer Effect