Geopsychology: Your personality depends on where you live

The nascent field of geopsychology shows that the Big Five personality traits vary by region. But not all results conform to stereotype. KEY TAKEAWAYS Scientists in the relatively new field of “geopsychology” are seeing links between personality and location. A recent study found geographically significant variations in the distribution of the Big Five personality traits. It turns out that Southerners are more agreeable, while Northeasterners are more neurotic — but not all results conform to stereotype. The Big Five personality traits, a.k.a. the CANOE model. There is also a geographic component to their distribution, research suggests. (Credit: MissLunaRose12 / Wikimedia … Continue reading Geopsychology: Your personality depends on where you live

La Niña is coming. Here’s what that means for winter weather in the U.S.

By Rachel Treisman/NPR (College Park, Md.) — La Niña will most likely be joining us for the winter again, according to federal forecasters. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Climate Prediction Center announced on Thursday that La Niña conditions have developed and are expected to continue, with an 87% chance that they will be in place from December to February. La Niña (translated from Spanish as “little girl”) is not a storm, but a climate pattern that occurs in the Pacific Ocean every few years and can impact weather around the world. The U.S. is expected to feel its effects on … Continue reading La Niña is coming. Here’s what that means for winter weather in the U.S.

Native Americans Are Not Who We Thought They Were, Study Finds

By James Felton A widely believed theory about the origins of Native Americans has been dealt a huge blow by a new genetic analysis of ancient teeth, implying the ancient inhabitants of what is now America were not who we thought they were. Based on this and analysis of their migration across the continent, it’s been suggested that Native Americans made their way across the northern rim of the Pacific Ocean, across the Bering Land Bridge – dry land that connected Siberia and Alaska during the last ice age – until they reached the northwest coast of North America. That much may still be true, … Continue reading Native Americans Are Not Who We Thought They Were, Study Finds

The South African model

What the United States and other settler societies can learn from South Africa’s push to create a nonracial democracy Mahmood Mamdani is Herbert Lehman Professor of Government at Columbia University in New York City and executive director of the Makere Institute of Social Research in Kampala, Uganda. His books include Saviors and Survivors: Darfur, Politics, and the War on Terror (2009) and Neither Settler Nor Native: The Making and Unmaking of Permanent Minorities (2020) Edited bySam Haselby In the course of the struggle against apartheid, South Africans did something remarkable: they tried, with incomplete success, to destroy the settler and the native by reconfiguring … Continue reading The South African model

A sense of belonging is what drives well-being—and it’s disappearing

Our social connectedness drives our happiness; after more than a year of social isolation, there’s a clear opportunity for brands that can build belonging. BY SEBASTIAN BUCK AND BRIAN HARDWICK The most striking revelation from an 80-year Harvard study of health and aging is that close relationships are what keep people happy throughout their lives, and these relationships with family, friends, and community delay mental and physical decline. These social ties are better predictors of our happiness and longevity than social class, IQ, or genetics. Last year, our company, Enso, helped the large job website Indeed design research into how people thrive at work; … Continue reading A sense of belonging is what drives well-being—and it’s disappearing

Vast early America

There is no American history without the histories of Indigenous and enslaved peoples. And this past has consequences today Karin Wulf is executive director of the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and professor of history at William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. Edited bySam Haselby Nations need history; it is a key genre for explaining the status quo. Modern nations and modern historical practices in the West developed over the same centuries, so the effort to harness the latter to the former is no surprise. Yet whether about the removal of statues, the veracity of journalism and … Continue reading Vast early America

The Woman Who Saved the Hawks: Redeeming an Overlooked Pioneer of Conservation

The story of the countercultural courage and persistence that shaped the modern ecological conscience. BY MARIA POPOVA It is 1928 and you are walking in Central Park, saxophone and wren song in the April air, when you spot her beneath the colossal leafing elm with her binoculars. You mistake her for another pearled Upper East Side lady who has taken to birding in the privileged boredom of her middle age. And who could blame you? In some obvious ways — polished and traveled, born into a wealthy New York family to a British father whose first cousin was Charles Dickens … Continue reading The Woman Who Saved the Hawks: Redeeming an Overlooked Pioneer of Conservation

People gave up on flu pandemic measures a century ago when they tired of them – and paid a price

Author J. Alexander Navarro Assistant Director of the Center for the History of Medicine, University of Michigan State and local officials enact a slate of social-distancing measures, gathering bans, closure orders and mask mandates in an effort to stem the tide of cases and deaths. The public responds with widespread compliance mixed with more than a hint of grumbling, pushback and even outright defiance. As the days turn into weeks turn into months, the strictures become harder to tolerate. Theater and dance hall owners complain about their financial losses. Clergy bemoan church closures while offices, factories and in some cases even saloons … Continue reading People gave up on flu pandemic measures a century ago when they tired of them – and paid a price

Why Phoenix may be uninhabitable by the end of this century

Factors like climate change and the destruction of urban foliage are causing cities like Phoenix to overheat By MATTHEW ROZSA “There will come a day when the temperature won’t fall below 100 degrees in Phoenix during the nighttime,” Dr. Andrew Ross, a professor of social and cultural analysis at New York University who wrote “Bird on Fire: Lessons from the World’s Least Sustainable City,” told Salon. “That will be a threshold of some kind.” The American Southwest has long been a refuge for those seeking the health benefits of warm, dry air and sunny days. But too much of a good thing is not a good thing … Continue reading Why Phoenix may be uninhabitable by the end of this century

CAN WE SAVE RESTAURANTS IN 2021?

by Eddie Kim  These three resilient, relentlessly optimistic restaurateurs certainly think so. But they also believe it will take bold, urgent action from the government to make it happen. When my parents bought a restaurant five years ago, the intention was never to turn it into something truly great. Auntie Pasto’s is a decent red-sauce Italian joint that I ate at once a month while growing up in suburban Hawaii, and I was surprised to hear that they had bought it in semi-retirement after selling off a sushi franchise they had built over the previous 15 years. They wouldn’t have to be so hands-on this … Continue reading CAN WE SAVE RESTAURANTS IN 2021?